c# open a pdf file : Delete pages in pdf online SDK Library project wpf .net web page UWP The-Odyssey-Greek-Translation23-part1250

With guile Odysseus drew away, then said:
“A pity that you have more looks than heart.
You’d grudge a pinch of salt from your own larder
to your own handy man. You sit here, fat
530
on others’ meat, and cannot bring yourself
to rummage out a crust of bread for me!”
Then anger made Antínoös’ heart beat hard,
and, glowering under his brows, he answered:
“Now!
You think you’ll shuffle off and get away 
after that impudence? Oh, no you don’t!”
The stool he let fly hit the man’s right shoulder
on the packed muscle under the shoulder blade—
like solid rock, for all the effect one saw.
Odysseus only shook his head, containing
540
thoughts of bloody work, as he walked on,
then sat, and dropped his loaded bag again
upon the door sill. Facing the whole crowd
he said, and eyed them all:
“One word only,
my lords, and suitors of the famous queen.
One thing I have to say.
There is no pain, no burden for the heart
when blows come to a man, and he defending
his own cattle—his own cows and lambs.
Here it was otherwise. Antínoös 
550
hit me for being driven on by hunger—
how many bitter seas men cross for hunger!
If beggars interest the gods, if there are Furies
pent in the dark to avenge a poor man’s wrong, then may
Antínoös meet his death before his wedding day!”
Then said Eupeithês’ son, Antínoös:
“Enough.
Eat and be quiet where you are, or shamble elsewhere,
unless you want these lads to stop your mouth
pulling you by the heels, or hands and feet,
over the whole floor, till your back is peeled!”
560
But now the rest were mortified, and someone
spoke from the crowd of young bucks to rebuke him:
“A poor show, that—hitting this famished tramp—
bad business, if he happened to be a god.
You know they go in foreign guise, the gods do,
looking like strangers, turning up
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Seventeen
503
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 503
Delete pages in pdf online - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages from a pdf document; delete page on pdf document
Delete pages in pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete blank page from pdf; cut pages from pdf preview
in towns and settlements to keep an eye
on manners, good or bad.”
But at this notion
Antínoös only shrugged.
Telémakhos,
after the blow his father bore, sat still
570
without a tear, though his heart felt the blow.
Slowly he shook his head from side to side,
containing murderous thoughts.
Penélopê
on the higher level of her room had heard
the blow, and knew who gave it. Now she murmured:
“Would god you could be hit yourself, Antínoös—
hit by Apollo’s bowshot!”
And Eur´ynomê
her housekeeper, put in:
“He and no other?
If all we pray for came to pass, not one
would live till dawn!”
Her gentle mistress said:
580
“Oh, Nan,
10
they are a bad lot; they intend
ruin for all of us; but Antínoös 
appears a blacker-hearted hound than any.
Here is a poor man come, a wanderer,
driven by want to beg his bread, and everyone
in hall gave bits, to cram his bag—only
Antínoös threw a stool, and banged his shoulder!’’
So she described it, sitting in her chamber
among her maids—while her true lord was eating.
Then she called in the forester and said:
590
“Go to that man on my behalf, Eumaios,
and send him here, so I can greet and question him.
Abroad in the great world, he may have heard
rumors about Odysseus—may have known him!”
Then you replied—O swineherd!
“Ah, my queen,
if these Akhaian sprigs would hush their babble
the man could tell you tales to charm your heart.
Three days and nights I kept him in my hut;
he came straight off a ship, you know, to me.
10
Affectionate diminutive for an old woman.
504
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 504
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
add and remove pages from pdf file online; delete page pdf acrobat reader
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
reader extract pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf in reader
There was no end to what he made me hear
600
of his hard roving; and I listened, eyes
upon him, as a man drinks in a tale
a minstrel sings—a minstrel taught by heaven
to touch the hearts of men. At such a song
the listener becomes rapt and still. Just so
I found myself enchanted by this man.
He claims an old tie with Odysseus, too—
in his home country, the Minoan11 land
of Krete. From Krete he came, a rolling stone
washed by the gales of life this way and that
610
to our own beach.
If he can be believed
he has news of Odysseus near at hand
alive, in the rich country of Thesprotia,
bringing a mass of treasure home.”
Then wise Penélopê said again:
“Go call him, let him come here, let him tell
that tale again for my own ears.
Our friends
can drink their cups outside or stay in hall,
being so carefree. And why not? Their stores
lie intact in their homes, both food and drink,
620
with only servants left to take a little.
But these men spend their days around our house
killing our beeves, our fat goats and our sheep,
carousing, drinking up our good dark wine;
sparing nothing, squandering everything.
No champion like Odysseus takes our part.
Ah, if he comes again, no falcon ever
struck more suddenly than he will, with his son,
to avenge this outrage!”
The great hall below
at this point rang with a tremendous sneeze
12
630
“kchaou!” from Telémakhos—like an acclamation.
And laughter seized Penélopê.
Then quickly,
lucidly she went on:
“Go call the stranger
straight to me. Did you hear that, Eumaios?
My son’s thundering sneeze at what I said!
May death come of a sudden so; may death
relieve us, clean as that, of all the suitors!
11
Minos, to whom the adjective Minoan refers, had been king of Krete (Crete).
12
A sneeze was regarded as a sign of good luck.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Seventeen
505
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 505
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET
delete pages from pdf acrobat; delete a page from a pdf reader
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pages in pdf reader; delete pdf pages acrobat
Let me add one thing—do not overlook it—
if I can see this man has told the truth,
I promise him a warm new cloak and tunic.”
640
With all this in his head, the forester
went down the hall, and halted near the beggar,
saying aloud:
“Good father, you are called
by the wise mother of Telémakhos,
Penélopê. The queen, despite her troubles,
is moved by a desire to hear your tales
about her lord—and if she finds them true,
she’ll see you clothed in what you need, a cloak
and a fresh tunic.
You may have your belly
full each day you go about this realm
650
begging. For all may give, and all they wish.”
Now said Odysseus, the old soldier:
“Friend,
I wish this instant I could tell my facts
to the wise daughter of Ikários, Penélopê—
and I have much to tell about her husband;
we went through much together.
But just now
this hard crowd worries me. They are, you said
infamous to the very rim of heaven
for violent acts: and here, just now, this fellow
660
gave me a bruise. What had I done to him?
But who would lift a hand for me? Telémakhos?
Anyone else?
No; bid the queen be patient,
Let her remain till sundown in her room,
and then—if she will seat me near the fire—
inquire tonight about her lord’s return.
My rags are sorry cover; you know that;
I showed my sad condition first to you.”
The woodsman heard him out, and then returned;
but the queen met him on her threshold, crying:
670
“Have you not brought him? Why? What is he thinking?
Has he some fear of overstepping? Shy
about these inner rooms? A hangdog beggar?”
To this you answered, friend Eumaios:
“No:
he reasons as another might, and well,
506
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 506
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
delete blank pages from pdf file; delete pages pdf document
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete page on pdf; cut pages from pdf file
not to tempt any swordplay from these drunkards.
Be patient, wait—he says—till darkness falls.
And, O my queen, for you too that is better:
better to be alone with him, and question him,
680
and hear him out.”
Penélopê replied:
“He is no fool; he sees how it could be.
Never were mortal men like these
for bullying and brainless arrogance!”
Thus she accepted what had been proposed,
so he went back into the crowd. He joined
Telémakhos, and said at once in whispers—
his head bent, so that no one else might hear:
“Dear prince, I must go home to keep good watch
on hut and swine, and look to my own affairs.
690
Everything here is in your hands. Consider
your own safety before the rest; take care
not to get hurt. Many are dangerous here.
May Zeus destroy them first, before we suffer!”
Telémakhos said:
“Your wish is mine, Uncle.
Go when your meal is finished. Then come back
at dawn, and bring good victims for a slaughter.
Everything here is in my hands indeed—
and in the disposition of the gods.”
Taking his seat on the smooth bench again,
700
Eumaios ate and drank his fill, then rose
to climb the mountain trail back to his swine,
leaving the mégaron and court behind him
crowded with banqueters.
These had their joy
of dance and song, as day waned into evening.
BOOK EIGHTEEN: BLOWS AND A QUEEN’S BEAUTY
Now a true scavenger came in—a public tramp
who begged around the town of Ithaka,
a by-word for his insatiable swag-belly,
feeding and drinking, dawn to dark. No pith
was in him, and no nerve, huge as he looked.
Arnaios, as his gentle mother called him,
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Eighteen
507
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 507
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. Explanation about transparency. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online. This
delete pages on pdf online; cut pages from pdf reader
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
copy pages from pdf to word; delete page on pdf reader
he had been nicknamed “Iros”1 by the young
for being ready to take messages.
This fellow
thought he would rout Odysseus from his doorway,
growling at him:
“Clear out, grandfather,
10
or else be hauled out by the ankle bone.
See them all giving me the wink? That means,
‘Go on and drag him out!’ I hate to do it.
Up with you! Or would you like a fist fight?”
Odysseus only frowned and looked him over,
taking account of everything, then said:
“Master, I am no trouble to you here.
I offer no remarks. I grudge you nothing.
Take all you get, and welcome. Here is room
for two on this doorslab—or do you own it?
20
You are a tramp, I think, like me. Patience:
a windfall from the gods will come. But drop
that talk of using fists; it could annoy me.
Old as I am, I might just crack a rib
or split a lip for you. My life would go
even more peacefully, after tomorrow,
looking for no more visits here from you.”
Iros the tramp grew red and hooted:
“Ho,
listen to him! The swine can talk your arm off,
30
like an old oven woman! With two punches
I’d knock him snoring, if I had a mind to—
and not a tooth left in his head, the same
as an old sow caught in the corn! Belt up!
And let this company see the way I do it
when we square off. Can you fight a fresher man?”
Under the lofty doorway, on the door sill
of wide smooth ash, they held this rough exchange.
And the tall full-blooded suitor, Antínoös,
overhearing, broke into happy laughter.
40
Then he said to the others:
“Oh, my friends,
no luck like this ever turned up before!
What a farce heaven has brought this house!
The stranger
and Iros have had words, they brag of boxing!
Into the ring they go, and no more talk!”
1
A pun on Iris, goddess of the rainbow and a messenger of the gods.
508
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 508
All the young men got on their feet now, laughing,
to crowd around the ragged pair. Antínoös
called out:
“Gentlemen, quiet! One more thing:
here are goat stomachs ready on the fire
to stuff with blood and fat, good supper pudding.
50
The man who wins this gallant bout
may step up here and take the one he likes.
And let him feast with us from this day on:
no other beggar will be admitted here
when we are at our wine.”
This pleased them all.
But now that wily man, Odysseus, muttered:
“An old man, an old hulk, has no business
fighting a young man, but my belly nags me;
nothing will do but I must take a beating.
Well, then, let every man here swear an oath
60
not to step in for Iros. No one throw
a punch for luck. I could be whipped that way.”
So much the suitors were content to swear,
but after they reeled off their oaths, Telémakhos
put in a word to clinch it, saying:
“Friend,
if you will stand and fight, as pride requires,
don’t worry about a foul blow from behind.
Whoever hits you will take on the crowd.
You have my word as host; you have the word
of these two kings, Antínoös and Eur´ymakhos—
70
a pair of thinking men.”
All shouted, “Aye!”
So now Odysseus made his shirt a belt
and roped his rags around his loins, baring
his hurdler’s thighs and boxer’s breadth of shoulder,
the dense rib-sheath and upper arms. Athena
stood nearby to give him bulk and power,
while the young suitors watched with narrowed eyes—
and comments went around:
“By god, old Iros now retiros.”
“Aye,
he asked for it, he’ll get it—bloody, too.”
80
“The build this fellow had, under his rags!”
Panic made Iros’ heart jump, but the yard-boys
hustled and got him belted by main force,
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Eighteen
509
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 509
though all his blubber quivered now with dread.
Antínoös’ angry voice rang in his ears:
“You sack of guts, you might as well be dead,
might as well never have seen the light of day,
if this man makes you tremble! Chicken-heart,
afraid of an old wreck, far gone in misery!
Well, here is what I say—and what I’ll do.
90
If this ragpicker can outfight you, whip you,
I’ll ship you out to that king in Epeíros,
Ékhetos2—he skins everyone alive.
Let him just cut your nose off and your ears
and pull your privy parts out by the roots
to feed raw to his hunting dogs!”
Poor Iros
felt a new fit of shaking take his knees.
But the yard-boys pushed him out. Now both contenders
put their hands up. Royal Odysseus
pondered if he should hit him with all he had
100
and drop the man dead on the spot, or only
spar, with force enough to knock him down.
Better that way, he thought—a gentle blow,
else he might give himself away.
The two
were at close quarters now, and Iros lunged
hitting the shoulder. Then Odysseus hooked him
under the ear and shattered his jaw bone,
so bright red blood came bubbling from his mouth,
as down he pitched into the dust, bleating,
kicking against the ground, his teeth stove in.
110
The suitors whooped and swung their arms, half dead
with pangs of laughter.
Then, by the ankle bone,
Odysseus hauled the fallen one outside,
crossing the courtyard to the gate, and piled him
against the wall. In his right hand he stuck
his begging staff, and said:
“Here, take your post.
Sit here to keep the dogs and pigs away.
You can give up your habit of command
over poor waifs and beggarmen—you swab.
Another time you may not know what hit you.”
120
When he had slung his rucksack by the string
over his shoulder, like a wad of rags,
he sat down on the broad door sill again,
2
Probably a nonhistorical tyrannical ruler whose name was a byword for cruelty. Epeíros
(Epirus), in the preceding line, is the Grecian mainland north of Ithaka.
510
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 510
as laughing suitors came to flock inside;
and each young buck in passing gave him greeting,
saying, maybe,
“Zeus fill your pouch for this!
May the gods grant your heart’s desire!”
“Well done
to put that walking famine out of business.”
“We’ll ship him out to that king in Epeíros,
Ékhetos—he skins everyone alive.”
130
Odysseus found grim cheer in their good wishes—
his work had started well.
Now from the fire
his fat blood pudding came, deposited
before him by Antínoös—then, to boot,
two brown loaves from the basket, and some wine
in a fine cup of gold. These gifts Amphínomos
gave him. Then he said:
“Here’s luck, grandfather;
a new day; may the worst be over now.”
Odysseus answered, and his mind ranged far:
“Amphínomos, your head is clear, I’d say;
140
so was your father’s—or at least I’ve heard
good things of Nísos the Doulíkhion,
whose son you are, they tell me—an easy man.
And you seem gently bred.
In view of that,
I have a word to say to you, so listen.
Of mortal creatures, all that breathe and move,
earth bears none frailer than mankind. What man
believes in woe to come, so long as valor
and tough knees are supplied him by the gods?
But when the gods in bliss bring miseries on,
150
then willy-nilly, blindly, he endures.
Our minds are as the days are, dark or bright,
blown over by the father of gods and men.
So I, too, in my time thought to be happy;
but far and rash I ventured, counting on
my own right arm, my father, and my kin;
behold me now.
No man should flout the law,
but keep in peace what gifts the gods may give.
I see you young blades living dangerously,
a household eaten up, a wife dishonored—
160
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Eighteen
511
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 511
and yet the master will return, I tell you,
to his own place, and soon; for he is near.
So may some power take you out of this,
homeward, and softly, not to face that man
the hour he sets foot on his native ground.
Between him and the suitors I foretell
no quittance,3 no way out, unless by blood,
once he shall stand beneath his own roof-beam.”
Gravely, when he had done, he made libation
and took a sip of honey-hearted wine,
170
giving the cup, then, back into the hands
of the young nobleman. Amphínomos, for his part,
shaking his head, with chill and burdened breast,
turned in the great hall.
Now his heart foreknew
the wrath to come, but he could not take flight,
being by Athena bound there.
Death would have him
broken by a spear thrown by Telémakhos.
So he sat down where he had sat before.
And now heart-prompting from the grey-eyed goddess
came to the quiet queen, Penélopê:
180
a wish to show herself before the suitors;
for thus by fanning their desire again
Athena meant to set her beauty high
before her husband’s eyes, before her son.
Knowing no reason, laughing confusedly,
she said:
“Eur´ynomê, I have a craving
I never had at all—I would be seen
among those ruffians, hateful as they are.
I might well say a word, then, to my son,
for his own good—tell him to shun that crowd;
190
for all their gay talk, they are bent on evil.”
Mistress Eur´ynomê replied:
“Well said, child,
now is the time. Go down, and make it clear,
hold nothing back from him.
But you must bathe
and put a shine upon your cheeks—not this way,
streaked under your eyes and stained with tears.
You make it worse, being forever sad,
and now your boy’s a bearded man! Remember
you prayed the gods to let you see him so.”
3
Repayment.
512
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 512
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested