c# open a pdf file : Delete pages from pdf document application control tool html azure wpf online smith_modern_optical_engineering27-part127

departures from these infinite conjugates are the rule, but for the most
part they may be neglected. However, the reader should be aware that
the fact that the object and/or the image are not at infinity will occa-
sionally have a noticeable effect and must then be taken into account.
This is usually important only with low-power devices. See also the
comments on instrument myopia in Sec. 5.4.
There are three major types of telescopes: astronomical (or invert-
ing),  terrestrial  (or  erecting),  and  Galilean.  An  astronomical  or
Keplerian telescope is composed of two positive (i.e., converging) com-
ponents spaced so that the second focal point of the first component
coincides with the  first  focal point of  the second,  as  shown  in Fig.
9.1a.The  objective  lens  (the  component  nearer  the object)  forms an
inverted image at its focal point; the eyelens then reimages the object
at infinity where it may be comfortably viewed by a relaxed eye. Since
the internal image is inverted, and the eyelens does not reinvert the
image, the view presented to the eye is inverted top to bottom and
reversed left to right.
In a  Galilean,  or “Dutch,” telescope,  9.1b,  the positive eyelens  is
replaced by a negative (diverging) eyelens; the spacing is the same, in
that the focal points of objective and eyelens coincide. In the Galilean
scope, however, the internal image is never actually formed; the object
252
Chapter Nine
Figure 9.1
The three basic types of telescope.
Delete pages from pdf document - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page pdf; delete page pdf file
Delete pages from pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from pdf; delete pdf pages in preview
for the eyelens is a “virtual” object, no inversion occurs, and the final
image presented to the eye is erect and unreversed. Since there is no
real image formed in a Galilean telescope, there is no location where
cross hairs or a reticle may be inserted.
Assuming the components of the telescope to be thin lenses, we can
derive several important relationships which apply to all telescopes
and afocal systems and which are of great utility. First, it is readily
apparent that the length (D) of a simple telescope is equal to the sum
of the focal lengths of the objective and eyelens.
D= f
o
+f
e
(9.1)
Note  that  in  the  Galilean  telescope,  the  spacing  is  the  difference
between the absolute values of the focal lengths since f
e
is negative.
The magnification, or magnifying power, of the telescope is the ratio
between u
e
,the angle subtended by the image, and u
o
,the angle sub-
tended by the object. The size (h) of the internal image formed by the
objective will be
h= u
o
f
o
(9.2)
and the angle subtended by this image from the first principal point of
the eyelens will be
u
e
=
(9.3)
Combining Eqs. 9.2 and 9.3, we get the magnification
MP =
=
(9.4)
and
f
e
=D/(1 - MP)
f
o
=MPD/(1 - MP)
The sign convention here is that a positive magnification indicates an
erect  image. Thus, if  objective and  eyelens both have positive  focal
lengths, MP is negative and the telescope is inverting. The Galilean
scope with objective and eyelens of opposite sign produces a positive
MP and an erect image.
Note that u
o
can represent the real angular field of view of the tele-
scope  and  u
e
the apparent angular  field  of  view,  and  that  Eq.  9.4
defines the relationship between the real and apparent fields for small
angles. For large angles, the tangents of the half-field angles should be
substituted in this expression.
-f
o
f
e
u
e
u
o
-h
f
e
Basic Optical Devices
253
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete page in pdf preview; delete blank page in pdf online
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing
delete pages out of a pdf file; delete page from pdf
From Chap. 6 we recall that the exit pupil of a system is the image
(formed by the system) of the entrance pupil. In most telescopes the
objective clear aperture is the entrance pupil and the exit pupil is the
image of the objective as formed by the eyelens. Using the newtonian
expression relating object and image sizes (h′=hf/x), and substituting
CA
e
(the exit pupil diameter) and CA
o
(the entrance pupil diameter) for
h′ and h, f
e
for f, and -f
o
for x, we get
=
=MP
(9.5)
While the above derivation has assumed the entrance pupil to be at
the objective, Eq. 9.5 is valid regardless of the pupil location, as is obvi-
ous from the rays sketched in Fig. 9.1.
We also can get a simple expression for the eye relief of the Kepler
telescope as follows:
R= (MP - 1) f
e
/MP
The amount of motion of the eyepiece needed to focus the telescope
for someone who is nearsighted or farsighted is given by
= Df
2
e
/1000
where  is in millimeters and D is in diopters.
Equations 9.4 and 9.5 can be combined to relate the external char-
acteristics (magnifications, fields of view, and pupils) of any afocal sys-
tem, regardless of its internal construction
MP =
=
(9.6)
The erecting telescope, Fig. 9.1c, consists of positive objective and
eyelenses with an erecting lens between the two. The erector reimages
the image formed by the objective into the focal plane of the eyelens.
Since it inverts the image in the process, the final image presented to
the eye is erect. This is the form of telescope ordinarily used for observ-
ing terrestrial objects, where considerable confusion can result from
an inverted image. (An erect image may also be obtained by the use of
an erecting prism as discussed in Chap. 4.) The magnification of a ter-
restrial telescope is simply the magnification that the telescope would
have without the erector, multiplied by the linear magnification of the
erector system
MP = -
̇
(9.7)
s
2
s
1
f
o
f
e
CA
o
CA
e
u
e
u
o
-f
o
f
e
CA
o
CA
e
254
Chapter Nine
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete pdf pages android; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Create the new document with 3 pages. String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; newDoc.Save(outputFilePath);
delete pdf pages online; delete a page from a pdf acrobat
where s
2
and s
1
are the erector conjugates as indicated in Fig. 9.1c. For
a scope as shown, f
o
, f
e
,and s
2
are positive signed quantities and s
1
is
negative. The resulting MP is thus positive, indicating an erect image.
An afocal system is the basis of the laser beam expander. The beam
diameter of a laser is enlarged by a factor equal to the MP when the
laser beam is sent into the eyepiece end of the telescope. Expansion of
the beam reduces the beam divergence. The Galilean form (Fig. 9.1b)
is  usually  preferred  because  there  is  no  focus  (which  can  cause  a
breakdown of the air if the laser is powerful) and the optical design
characteristics are more favorable. However, the Keplerian form (Fig.
9.1a) is used when a spatial filter (a pinhole at the focus) is necessary.
An afocal system can also be used to change the power, focal length,
and/or the field of view of another system by inserting it in a space in
the system where the light is collimated (i.e., where the object or image
is at infinity.) (See Sec. 13.3 and Fig. 13.32.)
Note that an afocal system can be used to image objects which are
not at an infinite distance. For example, the exit pupil of a telescope is
the image of the aperture stop, which is usually at the objective lens.
Again, a consideration of the rays diagramed in Fig. 9.1 will indicate
that the linear magnification m is the same, regardless of where the
object and image are located. The magnification m=h′/h is equal to the
reciprocal  of  the  angular  magnification,  MP.  Thus,  m=h′/h=1/MP.
Note that if the aperture stop is placed at the internal focus, then the
afocal system becomes telecentric in both object and image space.
9.2 Field Lenses and Relay Systems
In a simple two-element telescope as shown in Fig 9.2a, the field of
view is limited by  the diameter of the eyelens (as was discussed at
greater length in Chap. 6). In the sketch, the solid rays indicate the
largest field angle that a bundle may have and still pass through the
telescope without vignetting; for the bundle represented by the dashed
rays, only the ray through the upper rim of the objective gets through,
and vignetting is effectively complete.
The function of a field lens is indicated in Fig. 9.2b. If the field lens
is placed exactly at the internal image, it has no effect on the power of
the telescope, but it bends the ray bundles (which would otherwise miss
the eyelens) back toward the axis so that they pass through the eye-
lens. In this way the field of view may be increased without increasing
the diameter of the eyelens. Note that the exit pupil is shifted to the
left, closer to the eyelens, by the introduction of a positive field lens.
The distance from the vertex of the eyelens to the exit pupil is called
the “eye relief” (since the eye must be placed at the pupil to see the full
field of view). The necessity for a positive eye relief obviously limits the
Basic Optical Devices
255
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
' Create the new document with 3 pages. Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf" newDoc.Save(outputFilePath).
delete pages out of a pdf; delete pages in pdf
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. How to delete a range of pages from a Word document. How to delete several defined pages from a Word document.
add or remove pages from pdf; copy pages from pdf to new pdf
strength of the field lens that can be used. In practice, field lenses are
rarely located exactly at the image plane, but either ahead of or behind
the image, so that imperfections in the field lens are out of focus and
are not visible.
Periscopes and endoscopes
When it is desired to carry an image through a relatively long distance
and the available space limits the diameter of the lenses which can be
used, a system of relay lenses can be effective. In Fig. 9.3, the objective
lens forms its image in field lens A. The image is then relayed to field
lensC by lens B which functions like an erector lens. The image is then
relayed again by lens D. The power of field lens A is chosen so that it
forms an image of the objective at lens B; similarly, field lens C forms
an image of lens B in lens D. In this way, the entrance pupil (which, in
this example, is at the objective) is imaged at each of the relay lenses
in turn and the image of the object is passed through the system with-
out vignetting. The dashed rays emerging from lens A will indicate the
large diameters which would otherwise be necessary to cover the same
field of view. This type of system is used in periscopes and endoscopes.
An optimum arrangement for most optical systems is often the lay-
out with the least total amount of lens power. In a periscope system the
minimum power system is simple to design. Given the maximum lens
diameter (which is determined by the available space) the image at the
field lenses is arranged to fill this diameter, and the clear aperture of
the relay lens is filled with the beam. Thus, with reference to Fig. 9.3,
the focal length of the objective is set equal to the field lens CA divided
256
Chapter Nine
Figure 9.2
The action of the field lens in increasing the field of view.
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
C#.NET PDF SDK - Edit PDF Document Metadata in C#.NET. Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project.
delete pages from pdf acrobat reader; delete page in pdf
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET
C#. How to delete a range of pages from a PowerPoint document. C#. How to delete several defined pages from a PowerPoint document.
delete page from pdf preview; delete pages pdf files
by the total field of view, and the distance from A to B is the product of
the relay lens CA times the f-number of the objective lens. Lenses B, C,
D, etc., all have the same focal length, which is half the distance from
Ato B, and lenses B, C, D, etc., are all working at unit magnification
(m = -1). This arrangement yields the minimum lens power for the
system; this is the best layout for a periscope system.
An endoscope is a miniature periscope used to examine the inside of
a cavity through a small orifice; they are widely used in medical appli-
cations. The size of the optics in a medical endoscope is on the order of
2 or 3 mm in diameter. The equivalent air path is the actual physical
path divided by the index of refraction. In an endoscope or periscope,
the number of relay stages is determined by the length of the instru-
ment. If the airspaces are filled with glass, the equivalent air path is
shortened by a factor equal to the index of the glass, and the number
of relay stages is thereby reduced. Rather than simply fill the spaces
with rods of glass, the relay lenses are typically made as cemented
doublets, with the flint (negative) element made thick enough to fill
the space. The outer surface of the flint is made convex so that it func-
tions as the field lens. This is often referred to as a rod-lens endoscope.
The reduction in the number of relay components both reduces the cost
of the endoscope and improves the image quality (especially by reduc-
ing the secondary spectrum and the Petzval field curvature).
9.3 Exit Pupils, the Eye, and Resolution
Since  almost  all  telescopes  are  visual  instruments,  they  must  be
designed to be compatible with the characteristics of the human eye.
In Chap. 5, we saw that the pupil of the eye varied in diameter from 2
mm to about 8 mm, depending on the age of the viewer and the bright-
ness of the scene being viewed. Since the pupil of the eye is, in effect,
a stop of a telescopic system, its effect must be considered. For ordi-
nary use, an exit pupil of 3 mm diameter will fill the pupil of the eye
and no increase in retinal illumination will be obtained by providing a
larger exit pupil. From Eq. 9.5, it is apparent that the maximum effec-
tive clear aperture for an ordinary telescope objective is thus limited to
Basic Optical Devices
257
Figure 9.3
Asystem of relay lenses.
a diameter of about 3 mm times the magnification. In practice, this is,
however,  a  fairly  flexible  situation.  In  surveying  instruments  exit
pupils of 1.0 to 1.5 mm are common, since size and weight are at a pre-
mium and resolution is the most desired characteristic. In ordinary
binoculars, a 5-mm pupil is usually provided; the added pupil diame-
ter makes it much easier to align the binocular with the eyes. For the
same reason, rifle scopes usually have exit pupils ranging in size from
5 to 10 mm. Telescopes and binoculars designed for use at low light lev-
els (such as night glasses) usually have 7- or 8-mm exit pupils in order
to obtain the maximum retinal illumination possible when the pupil of
the eye is large.
In Chap. 5, it was indicated that the resolution of the eye was at best
about one minute of arc; Chap. 6 indicated that the angular resolution
of a perfect optical system was (5.5/D) seconds of arc when the clear
aperture of the system (D) was expressed in inches. One or both of
these  limitations  will  govern  the  effective  performance of  any  tele-
scope, and for the most efficient design of a telescope, both should be
taken into account. If two objects which are to be resolved are sepa-
rated by an angle α, after magnification by a telescope their images
will be separated by (MP)α. If (MP)α exceeds one minute of arc, the eye
will be  able  to  separate  the  two  images;  if (MP)α is  less  than  one
minute, the two objects will not be seen as separate and distinct. Thus,
the magnification of a telescope should be chosen so that
MP >
(α in minutes)
>
(α in radians)
(9.8)
where α is the angle to be resolved. For critical work, a magnification
value considerably larger than indicated in Eq. 9.8 is often selected in
order to minimize the visual fatigue of the viewer.
From the opposite point of view, since the resolution of a telescope
(in object space) is limited to (5.5/D) seconds, it is apparent that the
smallest resolved detail in the image presented to the eye will subtend
an angle of (MP) (5.5/D) seconds, and if this angle equals or exceeds
one minute, the eye can discern all of the resolved details. Equating
this angle to one minute (60 seconds), we find that the maximum “use-
ful” power for a telescope is
MP = 11D
(9.9)
(when D is in inches). Magnification in excess of this power is termed
empty  magnification, since  it  produces  no  increase  in  resolution.
However, it is not unusual to utilize magnifications two or three times
0.0003
α
1
α
258
Chapter Nine
this  amount  to minimize  visual  effort. The upper  limit  on  effective
magnification usually occurs at the point when the diffraction blurring
of the image becomes a distraction sufficient to offset the gain in visu-
al facility.
Example A
As numerical examples to illustrate  the preceding sections, we  will
determine the necessary powers and spacings to produce a telescope
with the following characteristics: a magnification of 4× and a length
of 10 in. We will do this in turn for an inverting telescope, a Galilean
telescope,  and an erecting  telescope,  and  will discuss the  effects  of
arbitrarily limiting the element diameters to 1 in.
For a telescope with only two components, it is apparent that Eqs.
9.1 and 9.4 together determine the powers of the objective and eyelens.
Thus, we have
D= f
o
+f
e
=10 in
and
MP =
=±4×
where the sign of the magnification will determine whether the final
image is erect (+) or inverted (-). Combining the two expressions and
solving for the focal lengths, we get
f
o
=
f
e
=
For the inverting telescope, we simply substitute MP = -4 and D = 10
in, to find that the required focal length for the objective is 8 in; for the
eyelens, it is 2 in. Since the lens diameters are to be 1 in, the exit pupil
diameter is 0.25 in (from Eq. 9.5). The position of the exit pupil can be
determined by tracing a ray from the center of the objective through
the edge of the eyelens or by use of the thin-lens equation (Eq. 2.4), as
follows:
=
+
=
+
=
-
=0.4
s′ = 2.5 in
1
10
1
2
1
(-D)
1
f
e
1
s
1
f
1
s′
D

1- (MP)
(MP) D

(MP) - 1
-f
o
f
e
Basic Optical Devices
259
Thus, the eye relief of our simple telescope is 2
1
2
in.
The field of view of this telescope is not clearly defined, since it is
determined by vignetting at the eyelens, as consideration of Fig. 9.4
will indicate. The aperture will be 50 percent vignetted at a field angle
such that the principal (or chief) ray passes through the rim of the eye-
lens. Under these conditions
u
o
=
=
=±0.05 radians
and the real* field of view totals 0.1 radians, or about 5.7°.
This is a poor representation of what the eye will see, however, since
the vignetted exit pupil at this angle closely approximates a semicircle
0.25 in in diameter and can thus completely fill a 3-mm eye pupil. The
field angle at which no rays get through the telescope is a somewhat
more representative value for the field of view. If we visualize the size
of u
o
in Fig. 9.4 as being slowly increased, it is apparent that the ray
from the bottom of the objective will be the first to miss the eyelens
and the ray from the top of the objective will be the last to be vignetted
out. For the example we have chosen, with both lenses 1 in in diame-
ter, it is apparent that the limiting diameter of the internal image will
also be 1 in. (For differing lens diameters, it is a simple exercise in pro-
portion to determine the height at which this ray strikes the internal
focal plane.) The half field of view for 100 percent vignetting is then
the quotient of the semidiameter of the image divided by the objective
focal length, or ±0.0625 radians; the total real field is 0.125 radians, or
about 7.1°.
Thus, for an exit pupil of 0.25 in, the field of view is totally vignetted
at 0.125 rad, 50 percent vignetted at 0.1 rad, and unvignetted at 0.075
rad. These three conditions are illustrated in Fig. 9.5, and it is appar-
ent that the “effective” position of the exit pupil shifts inward as the
amount of vignetting increases.
1
2× 10
dia. eyelens

2D
260
Chapter Nine
Figure 9.4
The inverting telescope of Example A.
*The real field of a telescope is the (angular) field in the object space. The apparent
field is the (angular) field in the image (i.e., eye) space.
Let us now determine the minimum power for a field lens which will
completely eliminate the vignetting at a field angle of ±0.0625 rad.
From Fig. 9.6, it can be seen that the field lens must bend the rays
from the objective so that ray B strikes no higher than the upper rim
of the eyelens. The slope of ray B is equal to 1 in (the difference in the
heights at which it strikes the objective and the field lens) divided by
8 in (the distance from field lens to objective), or +0.125. After passing
through the field lens, we desire the slope to be zero (in this case) as
indicated by the dashed ray B′. Using Eq. 2.41, we can solve for the
power of the field lens as follows:
u′ = u - y
f
0.0 = +0.125- (0.5) 
f
f
=+0.25
f
f
=
=4 in
We can now determine the new eye relief by tracing a principal ray
from the center of the objective through the field and eye lenses.
1
Basic Optical Devices
261
Figure 9.5
The vignetting action of the eyelens determines the
field of view in an astronomical telescope.
Figure 9.6
Ray diagram used to determine field lens pow-
er in Example A.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested