c# open a pdf file : Delete pages from a pdf reader control software platform web page winforms html web browser The-Odyssey-Greek-Translation25-part1252

has gone out under heaven like the sweet
honor of some god-fearing king, who rules
in equity over the strong: his black lands bear
both wheat and barley, fruit trees laden bright,
new lambs at lambing time—and the deep sea
120
gives great hauls of fish by his good strategy,
so that his folk fare well.
O my dear lady,
this being so, let it suffice to ask me
of other matters—not my blood, my homeland.
Do not enforce me to recall my pain.
My heart is sore; but I must not be found
sitting in tears here, in another’s house:
it is not well forever to be grieving.
One of the maids might say—or you might think—
I had got maudlin over cups of wine.”
130
And Penélopê replied:
“Stranger, my looks,
my face, my carriage, were soon lost or faded
when the Akhaians crossed the sea to Troy,
Odysseus my lord among the rest.
If he returned, if he were here to care for me,
I might be happily renowned!
But grief instead heaven sent me—years of pain.
Sons of the noblest families on the islands,
Doulíkhion, Samê, wooded Zak´ynthos,
with native Ithakans, are here to court me,
140
against my wish; and they consume this house.
Can I give proper heed to guest or suppliant
or herald on the realm’s affairs?
How could I?
wasted with longing for Odysseus, while here
they press for marriage.
Ruses served my turn
to draw the time out—first a close-grained web
I had the happy thought to set up weaving
on my big loom in hall. I said, that day:
‘Young men—my suitors, now my lord is dead,
let me finish my weaving before I marry,
150
or else my thread will have been spun in vain.
It is a shroud I weave for Lord Laërtês
when cold Death comes to lay him on his bier.
The country wives would hold me in dishonor
if he, with all his fortune, lay unshrouded.’
I reached their hearts that way, and they agreed.
So every day I wove on the great loom,
but every night by torchlight I unwove it;
and so for three years I deceived the Akhaians.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Nineteen
523
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 523
Delete pages from a pdf reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page in pdf online; add and delete pages in pdf online
Delete pages from a pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page numbers in pdf; delete pdf pages
But when the seasons brought a fourth year on,
160
as long months waned, and the long days were spent,
through impudent folly in the slinking maids
they caught me—clamored up to me at night;
I had no choice then but to finish it.
And now, as matters stand at last,
I have no strength left to evade a marriage,
cannot find any further way; my parents
urge it upon me, and my son
will not stand by while they eat up his property.
He comprehends it, being a man full grown,
170
able to oversee the kind of house
Zeus would endow with honor.
But you too
confide in me, tell me your ancestry.
You were not born of mythic oak or stone.”
And the great master of invention answered:
“O honorable wife of Lord Odysseus,
must you go on asking about my family?
Then I will tell you, though my pain
be doubled by it: and whose pain would not
if he had been away as long as I have
180
and had hard roving in the world of men?
But I will tell you even so, my lady.
One of the great islands of the world
in midsea, in the winedark sea, is Krete:
spacious and rich and populous, with ninety
cities and a mingling of tongues.
Akhaians there are found, along with Kretan
hillmen of the old stock, and Kydonians,
Dorians in three blood-lines, Pelasgians
4
and one among their ninety towns is Knossos.
190
Here lived King Minos5 whom great Zeus received
every ninth year in private council—Minos,
the father of my father, Deukálion.
Two sons Deukálion had: Idómeneus,
who went to join the Atreidai before Troy
in the beaked ships of war; and then myself,
Aithôn by name—a stripling next my brother.
But I saw with my own eyes at Knossos once
Odysseus.
4
Kydonians, Dorians, Pelasgians were various ethnic groups, natives of Krete or immigrants.
5
Minos, sometimes represented as a cruel king (as in Book XI), is here represented as
supremely honored. Knossos is on the north shore of Krete. In this version of his autobiog-
raphy, Odysseus obviously departs from what he had told Eumaios (Book XIV) and Antínoös
(Book XVII).
524
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 524
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
delete pages on pdf; delete a page from a pdf file
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pages on pdf online; delete pages from pdf in preview
Gales had caught him off Cape Malea,
driven him southward on the coast of Krete,
200
when he was bound for Troy. At Ámnisos,
hard by the holy cave of Eileithuía,6
he lay to, and dropped anchor, in that open
and rough roadstead riding out the blow.
Meanwhile he came ashore, came inland, asking
after Idómeneus: dear friends he said they were;
but now ten mornings had already passed,
ten or eleven, since my brother sailed.
So I played host and took Odysseus home,
saw him well lodged and fed, for we had plenty;
210
then I made requisitions—barley, wine,
and beeves for sacrifice—to give his company
abundant fare along with him.
Twelve days
they stayed with us, the Akhaians, while that wind
out of the north shut everyone inside—
even on land you could not keep your feet,
such fury was abroad. On the thirteenth,
when the gale dropped, they put to sea.”
Now all these lies he made appear so truthful
she wept as she sat listening. The skin
220
of her pale face grew moist the way pure snow
softens and glistens on the mountains, thawed
by Southwind after powdering from the West,
and, as the snow melts, mountain streams run full:
so her white cheeks were wetted by these tears
shed for her lord—and he close by her side.
Imagine how his heart ached for his lady,
his wife in tears; and yet he never blinked; 
his eyes might have been made of horn or iron
for all that she could see. He had this trick—
230
wept, if he willed to, inwardly.
Well, then,
as soon as her relieving tears were shed
she spoke once more:
“I think that I shall say, friend,
give me some proof, if it is really true
that you were host in that place to my husband
with his brave men, as you declare. Come, tell me
the quality of his clothing, how he looked,
and some particular of his company.”
6
Ámnisos is an anchorage off Krete. Eileithuía was a goddess, daughter of Hêra, who con-
trolled maternal labor and childbirth.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Nineteen
525
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 525
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
cut pages out of pdf online; delete pdf pages ipad
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
delete page pdf; delete pdf page acrobat
Odysseus answered, and his mind ranged far:
“Lady, so long a time now lies between,
240
it is hard to speak of it. Here is the twentieth year
since that man left the island of my father.
But I shall tell what memory calls to mind.
A purple cloak, and fleecy, he had on—
a double thick one. Then, he wore a brooch
made of pure gold with twin tubes for the prongs,
and on the face a work of art: a hunting dog
pinning a spotted fawn in agony
between his forepaws—wonderful to see
how being gold, and nothing more, he bit
250
the golden deer convulsed, with wild hooves flying.
Odysseus’ shirt I noticed, too—a fine
closefitting tunic like dry onion skin,
so soft it was, and shiny.
Women there,
many of them, would cast their eyes on it.
But I might add, for your consideration,
whether he brought these things from home, or whether
a shipmate gave them to him, coming aboard,
I have no notion: some regardful host
in another port perhaps it was. Affection
260
followed him—there were few Akhaians like him.
And I too made him gifts: a good bronze blade,
a cloak with lining and a broidered shirt,
and sent him off in his trim ship with honor.
A herald, somewhat older than himself,
he kept beside him; I’ll describe this man:
round-shouldered, dusky, woolly-headed;
Eur´ybatês, his name was—and Odysseus
gave him preferment over the officers.
He had a shrewd head, like the captain’s own.”
270
Now hearing these details—minutely true—
she felt more strangely moved, and tears flowed
until she had tasted her salt grief again.
Then she found words to answer:
“Before this
you won my sympathy, but now indeed
you shall be our respected guest and friend.
With my own hands I put that cloak and tunic
upon him—took them folded from their place—
and the bright brooch for ornament.
Gone now,
I will not meet the man again
280
returning to his own home fields. Unkind
the fate that sent him young in the long ship
to see that misery at Ilion, unspeakable!”
526
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 526
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
add or remove pages from pdf; delete pages from a pdf reader
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in ASP.NET. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
add and delete pages from pdf; delete pdf pages online
And the master improviser answered:
“Honorable
wife of Odysseus Laërtiadês,
you need not stain your beauty with these tears,
nor wear yourself out grieving for your husband.
Not that I can blame you. Any wife
grieves for the man she married in her girlhood,
lay with in love, bore children to—though he
290
may be no prince like this Odysseus,
whom they compare even to the gods. But listen: 
weep no more, and listen:
I have a thing to tell you, something true.
I heard but lately of your lord’s return,
heard that he is alive, not far away,
among Thesprótians in their green land
amassing fortune to bring home. His company
went down in shipwreck in the winedark sea
off the coast of Thrinákia. Zeus and Hêlios
300
held it against him that his men had killed
the kine of Hêlios. The crew drowned for this.
He rode the ship’s keel. Big seas cast him up
on the island of Phaiákians, godlike men
who took him to their hearts. They honored him
with many gifts and a safe passage home,
or so they wished. Long since he should have been here,
but he thought better to restore his fortune
playing the vagabond about the world;
and no adventurer could beat Odysseus
310
at living by his wits—no man alive.
I had this from King Phaidôn of Thesprótia;
and, tipping wine out, Phaidôn swore to me
the ship was launched, the seamen standing by
to bring Odysseus to his land at last,
but I got out to sea ahead of him
by the king’s order—as it chanced a freighter
left port for the grain bins of Doulíkhion.
Phaidôn, however, showed me Odysseus’ treasure.
Ten generations of his heirs or more
320
could live on what lay piled in that great room.
The man himself had gone up to Dodona
to ask the spelling leaves of the old oak
what Zeus would have him do—how to return to Ithaka
after so many years—by stealth or openly.
You see, then, he is alive and well, and headed
homeward now, no more to be abroad
far from his island, his dear wife and son.
Here is my sworn word for it. Witness this,
god of the zenith, noblest of the gods,
330
and Lord Odysseus’ hearthfire, now before me:
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Nineteen
527
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 527
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
C:\test1.pdf") Dim pdf2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\test2.pdf") Dim pageindexes = New Integer() {1, 2, 4} Dim pages = pdf.DuplicatePage(pageindexes
reader extract pages from pdf; delete page pdf file reader
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
delete pages on pdf file; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
I swear these things shall turn out as I say.
Between this present dark and one day’s ebb,
after the wane, before the crescent moon,
7
Odysseus will come.”
Penélopê,
the attentive queen, replied to him:
“Ah, stranger,
if what you say could ever happen!
You would soon know our love! Our bounty, too:
men would turn after you to call you blessed.
But my heart tells me what must be.
340
Odysseus will not come to me; no ship
will be prepared for you. We have no master
quick to receive and furnish out a guest
as Lord Odysseus was.
Or did I dream him?
Maids, maids: come wash him, make a bed for him,
bedstead and colored rugs and coverlets
to let him lie warm into the gold of Dawn.
In morning light you’ll bathe him and anoint him
so that he’ll take his place beside Telémakhos
feasting in hall. If there be one man there
350
to bully or annoy him, that man wins
no further triumph here, burn though he may.
How will you understand me, friend, how find in me,
more than in common women, any courage
or gentleness, if you are kept in rags
and filthy at our feast? Men’s lives are short.
The hard man and his cruelties will be
cursed behind his back, and mocked in death.
But one whose heart and ways are kind—of him
strangers will bear report to the wide world,
360
and distant men will praise him.”
Warily
Odysseus answered:
“Honorable lady,
wife of Odysseus Laërtiadês,
a weight of rugs and cover? Not for me.
I’ve had none since the day I saw the mountains
of Krete, white with snow, low on the sea line
fading behind me as the long oars drove me north.
7Between now and the time of the new moon. As it happens, the day specified will be the
morrow.
528
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 528
Let me lie down tonight as I’ve lain often,
many a night unsleeping, many a time
afield on hard ground waiting for pure Dawn.
370
No: and I have no longing for a footbath
either; none of these maids will touch my feet,
unless there is an old one, old and wise,
one who has lived through suffering as I have:
I would not mind letting my feet be touched
by that old servant.”
And Penélopê said:
“Dear guest, no foreign man so sympathetic
ever came to my house, no guest more likeable,
so wry and humble are the things you say.
I have an old maidservant ripe with years,
380
one who in her time nursed my lord. She took him
into her arms the hour his mother bore him.
Let her, then, wash your feet, though she is frail.
Come here, stand by me, faithful Eur´ykleia,
and bathe—bathe your master, I almost said,
for they are of an age, and now Odysseus’
feet and hands would be enseamed like his.
Men grow old soon in hardship.”
Hearing this,
the old nurse hid her face between her hands
and wept hot tears, and murmured:
“Oh, my child!
390
I can do nothing for you! How Zeus hated you,
no other man so much! No use, great heart,
O faithful heart, the rich thighbones you burnt
to Zeus who plays in lightning—and no man
ever gave more to Zeus—with all your prayers
for a green age, a tall son reared to manhood.
There is no day of homecoming for you.
Stranger, some women in some far off place
perhaps have mocked my lord when he’d be home
as now these strumpets8 mock you here. No wonder
400
you would keep clear of all their whorishness
and have no bath. But here am I. The queen
Penélopê, Ikários’ daughter, bids me;
so let me bathe your feet to serve my lady—
to serve you, too.
My heart within me stirs,
mindful of something. Listen to what I say:
strangers have come here, many through the years,
8Whores.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Nineteen
529
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 529
but no one ever came, I swear, who seemed
so like Odysseus—body, voice and limbs—
as you do.”
Ready for this, Odysseus answered: 
410
“Old woman, that is what they say. All who have seen
the two of us remark how like we are,
as you yourself have said, and rightly, too.”
Then he kept still, while the old nurse filled up
her basin glittering in firelight; she poured
cold water in, then hot.
But Lord Odysseus
whirled suddenly from the fire to face the dark.
The scar: he had forgotten that. She must not
handle his scarred thigh, or the game was up.
But when she bared her lord’s leg, bending near,
420
she knew the groove at once.
An old wound
a boar’s white tusk inflicted, on Parnassos9
years ago. He had gone hunting there
in company with his uncles and Autólykos,
his mother’s father—a great thief and swindler
by Hermês’
10
favor, for Autólykos pleased him
with burnt offerings of sheep and kids. The god
acted as his accomplice. Well, Autólykos
on a trip to Ithaka
arrived just after his daughter’s boy was born.
430
In fact, he had no sooner finished supper
than Nurse Eur´ykleia put the baby down
in his own lap and said:
“It is for you, now,
to choose a name for him, your child’s dear baby;
the answer to her prayers.”
Autólykos replied:
“My son-in-law, my daughter, call the boy
by the name I tell you. Well you know, my hand
has been against the world of men and women;
odium and distrust I’ve won. Odysseus
should be his given name.
11
When he grows up,
440
when he comes visiting his mother’s home
9The famous mountain near Delphi. Also spelled Parnassus.
10Noted for cleverness, Hermês was the patron god of thieves, though he is not usually
presented in that role by Homer.
11Odysseusmeans something like “wrathful.”
530
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 530
under Parnassos, where my treasures are,
I’ll make him gifts and send him back rejoicing.”
Odysseus in due course went for the gifts,
and old Autólykos and his sons embraced him
with welcoming sweet words; and Amphithéa,
his mother’s mother, held him tight and kissed him,
kissed his head and his fine eyes.
The father
called on his noble sons to make a feast,
and going about it briskly they led in
450
an ox of five years, whom they killed and flayed
and cut in bits for roasting on the skewers
with skilled hands, with care; then shared it out.
So all the day until the sun went down
they feasted to their hearts’ content. At evening,
after the sun was down and dusk had come,
they turned to bed and took the gift of sleep.
When the young Dawn spread in the eastern sky
her finger tips of rose, the men and dogs
went hunting, taking Odysseus. They climbed
460
Parnassos’ rugged flank mantled in forest,
entering amid high windy folds at noon
when Hêlios beat upon the valley floor
and on the winding Ocean whence he came.
With hounds questing ahead, in open order,
the sons of Autólykos went down a glen,
Odysseus in the lead, behind the dogs,
pointing his long-shadowing spear.
Before them
a great boar lay hid in undergrowth,
in a green thicket proof against the wind
470
or sun’s blaze, fine soever the needling sunlight,
impervious too to any rain, so dense
that cover was, heaped up with fallen leaves.
Patter of hounds’ feet, men’s feet, woke the boar
as they came up—and from his woody ambush
with razor back bristling and raging eyes
he trotted and stood at bay. Odysseus,
being on top of him, had the first shot,
lunging to stick him; but the boar
had already charged under the long spear.
480
He hooked aslant with one white tusk and ripped out 
flesh above the knee, but missed the bone.
Odysseus’ second thrust went home by luck,
his bright spear passing through the shoulder joint;
and the beast fell, moaning as life pulsed away.
Autólykos’ tall sons took up the wounded,
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Nineteen
531
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 531
working skillfully over the Prince Odysseus
to bind his gash, and with a rune
12
they stanched
the dark flow of blood. Then downhill swiftly
they all repaired to the father’s house, and there
490
tended him well—so well they soon could send him,
with Grandfather Autólykos’ magnificent gifts,
rejoicing, over sea to Ithaka.
His father and the Lady Antikleía
welcomed him, and wanted all the news
of how he got his wound; so he spun out
his tale, recalling how the boar’s white tusk
caught him when he was hunting on Parnassos.
This was the scar the old nurse recognized;
she traced it under her spread hands, then let go,
500
and into the basin fell the lower leg
making the bronze clang, sloshing the water out.
Then joy and anguish seized her heart; her eyes
filled up with tears; her throat closed, and she whispered,
with hand held out to touch his chin:
“Oh yes!
You are Odysseus! Ah, dear child! I could not
see you until now—not till I knew
my master’s very body with my hands!”
Her eyes turned to Penélopê with desire
to make her lord, her husband, known—in vain,
510
because Athena had bemused the queen,
so that she took no notice, paid no heed.
At the same time Odysseus’ right hand
gripped the old throat; his left hand pulled her near,
and in her ear he said:
“Will you destroy me,
nurse, who gave me milk at your own breast?
Now with a hard lifetime behind I’ve come
in the twentieth year home to my father’s island.
You found me out, as the chance was given you.
Be quiet; keep it from the others, else
520
I warn you, and I mean it, too,
if by my hand god brings the suitors down
I’ll kill you, nurse or not, when the time comes—
when the time comes to kill the other women.”
Eur´ykleia kept her wits and answered him:
“Oh, what mad words are these you let escape you!
Child, you know my blood, my bones are yours;
12
Magic spell or charm.
532
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 532
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested