c# open a pdf file : Copy page from pdf control SDK system azure wpf html console The-Odyssey-Greek-Translation32-part1260

let him be king by a sworn pact forever,
and we, for our part, will blot out the memory
500
of sons and brothers slain. As in the old time
let men of Ithaka henceforth be friends;
prosperity enough, and peace attend them.”
Athena needed no command, but down
in one spring she descended from Olympos
just as the company of Odysseus finished
wheat crust and honeyed wine, and heard him say:
“Go out, someone, and see if they are coming.”
One of the boys went to the door as ordered
and saw the townsmen in the lane. He turned
510
swiftly to Odysseus.
“Here they come,”
he said, “best arm ourselves, and quickly.”
All up at once, the men took helm and shield—
four fighting men, counting Odysseus,
with Dólios’ half dozen sons. Laërtês
armed as well, and so did Dólios—
greybeards, they could be fighters in a pinch.
Fitting their plated helmets on their heads
they sallied out, Odysseus in the lead.
Now from the air Athena, Zeus’s daughter,
520
appeared in Mentor’s guise, with Mentor’s voice,
making Odysseus’ heart grow light. He said
to put cheer in his son:
“Telémakhos,
you are going into battle against pikemen
where hearts of men are tried. I count on you
to bring no shame upon your forefathers.
In fighting power we have excelled this lot
in every generation.”
Said his son:
“If you are curious, Father, watch and see
the stuff that’s in me. No more talk of shame.”
530
And old Laërtês cried aloud:
“Ah, what a day for me, dear gods!
to see my son and grandson vie in courage!”
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Twenty-Four
593
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 593
Copy page from pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete blank pages from pdf file; delete page in pdf preview
Copy page from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from pdf acrobat reader; delete blank page in pdf
Athena halted near him, and her eyes
shone like the sea. She said:
“Arkeísiadês,
dearest of all my old brothers-in-arms,
invoke the grey-eyed one and Zeus her father,
heft your spear and make your throw.”
Power flowed into him from Pallas Athena,
whom he invoked as Zeus’s virgin child,
540
and he let fly his heavy spear.
It struck
Eupeithês on the cheek plate of his helmet,
and undeflected the bronze head punched through.
He toppled, and his armor clanged upon him.
Odysseus and his son now furiously
closed, laying on with broadswords, hand to hand,
and pikes: they would have cut the enemy down
to the last man, leaving not one survivor,
had not Athena raised a shout
that stopped all fighters in their tracks.
“Now hold!”
550
she cried, “Break off this bitter skirmish;
end your bloodshed, Ithakans, and make peace.”
Their faces paled with dread before Athena,
and swords dropped from their hands unnerved, to lie
strewing the ground, at the great voice of the goddess.
Those from the town turned fleeing for their lives.
But with a cry to freeze their hearts
and ruffling like an eagle on the pounce,
the lord Odysseus reared himself to follow—
at which the son of Kronos dropped a thunderbolt
560
smoking at his daughter’s feet.
Athena
cast a grey glance at her friend and said:
“Son of Laërtês and the gods of old,
Odysseus, master of land ways and sea ways,
command yourself. Call off this battle now,
or Zeus who views the wide world may be angry.”
He yielded to her, and his heart was glad.
Both parties later swore to terms of peace
set by their arbiter, Athena, daughter
of Zeus who bears the stormcloud as a shield—
570
though still she kept the form and voice of Mentor.
594
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 594
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
String filepath = @""; String outPutFilePath = @""; PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(filepath); // Copy the first page of PDF document.
cut pages out of pdf online; delete pages from pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Dim filepath As String = "" Dim outPutFilePath As String = "" Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(filepath) ' Copy the first page of PDF document.
delete page on pdf file; delete pages from a pdf file
Aesop
(Sixth Century 
B
.
C
.)
Nowadays, fables are generally thought of as children’s literature: little ani-
mal stories that culminate in simplistic “morals” (“Haste makes waste,” or
“Don’t put off until tomorrow what you can do today”). Marcel Gutwirth,
one of the shrewdest students of the fable, points out that it is commonly
thought of as “the place where the archaic and the puerile meet.” There are
reasons for this modern link between fables and children. Renaissance edu-
cators used Aesop’s fables to teach Greek and Latin, thus creating an asso-
ciation between childhood and fables. The link was further strengthened in
the nineteenth century by teachers of the young who used translations of
the fables to teach moral lessons (not noticing, perhaps, how flimsily the
morals are sometimes linked to the stories or how the morals sometimes seem
contradictory). The connection persists; “Aesop” is to be found in the chil-
dren’s sections of bookstores.
The infantilizing of Aesop is unfortunate insofar as it leads us to ignore
a voice from classical Greece that is very different from the heroic, aristo-
cratic ones of epic and tragedy: the voice of ordinary people. It is true that
the voice is muffled in Aesop—the texts have gone through too many trans-
mogrifications to be perfectly clear—but they express, however indistinctly,
a view of Greece from the bottom up rather than from the top down. In
Aesop, as in many later fabulists, the fable is, in the words of another fine
critic, Annabel Patterson, “a medium of political analysis and communica-
tion, especially in the form of a communication from or on behalf of the
politically powerless.”
The serious student of Aesop is immediately confronted with two diffi-
culties: We do not know who Aesop was (if, indeed, he really existed), and
we do not know what he wrote. By the second half of the fifth century, his
name was well-known in Greece as a writer of fables who had lived in the
previous century. A book of his fables was in circulation at least by the time
of Plato, and the Greek historian Herodotus, in his Histories, identified him
as a sixth-century slave who lived on the island of Samos. References to him
in a number of other writers—Aristophanes, Xenophon, Plato, Aristotle, and
others—suggest that his name was generally recognizable as a writer of witty
fables. There would be no reason to doubt Herodotus’s facts (if they are facts)
if it were not that over the years the figure of Aesop became the subject of
fantastic legends. A fanciful “biography” of him was in circulation very early
and for centuries was attached to collections of the fables. This biography
asserted that he was hideously ugly and had a speech impediment, that he
recurringly clashed with the philosopher Xanthus (always coming out on top,
of course), and that his death came when the people of Delphi flung him
from a rock into the sea while he recited his fable of “The Eagle and the
Scarab Beetle.” One version even asserted that after his death he revived in
order to fight at the battle of Thermopylae. Perhaps it is appropriate that a
fable-writer be given a life so fabulous, but the effect of the legend was to
cast into doubt everything about Aesop, even his existence.
It is similarly impossible to determine what in “Aesop’s fables” is genuinely
Aesopian and what is not. There is no reason to believe that, if he existed,
595
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 595
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
in Page. VB.NET: Copy and Paste Image in PDF Page. This VB.NET example shows how to copy an image from one page of PDF document and paste it into another page.
delete pages pdf files; cut pages from pdf file
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
This C#.NET example describes how to copy an image from one page of PDF document and paste it into another page. // Define input and output documents.
copy page from pdf; delete pages from a pdf
he ever wrote anything down; the legends present him as a teller rather than
a writer. The collections that were in circulation in the fifth century, inso-
far as we know anything about them, seem to have been miscellaneous col-
lections of tales from various sources, some of them demonstrably predating
Aesop. Within a century after he was said to have lived, Aesop had become
“Aesop,” a generalized name that could be cited as the author of a large
body of folk narrative gathered from oral as well as written tradition.
Several collections of Aesop’s fables were apparently made in classical times;
one we know of indirectly was made by someone named Demetrius in about
300 
B
.
C
.But modern versions of Aesop derive mainly from the two earliest
collections to survive: a collection in Latin made by Phaedrus, a freed slave
who lived in Rome during the first century 
A
.
D
., and a collection in Greek
verse by Babrius in the second century 
A
.
D
.These early versions apparently
lacked the “morals” now generally assumed to be a defining characteristic
of fables; these were tacked onto the fables in medieval versions, probably
less to inculcate morality than to serve as a quick guide for using the fables
to make points in public speaking. The present translators, Olivia and Robert
Temple, comment that the morals are “often silly and inferior in wit and
interest  to  the  fables  themselves”  and  that  “some  of  them  are  truly
appalling, even idiotic.” At least one modern translator, Lloyd W. Daly, has
refused to print the morals and calls his version Aesop Without Morals. In some
ironic modern versions—those of La Fontaine, for example—the disjunc-
ture between fable and moral becomes significant in itself; a bland, innocu-
ous moral sometimes becoming a device of concealment for the genuinely
subversive content of the fable.
When we strip away the accretions of sentimentality and childishness that
have gathered around Aesop’s Fables, we glimpse a grim world indeed. The
Temples describe it well when they write that “the fables are not the pretty
purveyors of Victorian morals that we have been led to believe. They are
instead savage, coarse, brutal, lacking in all mercy or compassion, and lack-
ing also in any political system other than absolute monarchy. . . . This is
largely a world of brutal, heartless men—and of cunning, of wickedness, of
murder, of treachery and deceit, of laughter at the misfortune of others, of
mockery and contempt. It is also a world of savage humor, of deft wit, of
clever wordplay, of one-upmanship, of ‘I told you so!’”
This bleak assessment of the Aesopian world is accurate, but it perhaps
understates the variety of that world. The Fables are, among other things, a
joke book, and many of them seem intended as harmless entertainment. Many
of them, too, satirize common human foibles: conceit, laziness, drunkenness,
gluttony, and avarice. A number of others, underrepresented here, are bawdy
tales of sexual infidelity, often turning around an unfaithful wife and her gullible
husband. The gallery of animals, too, that inhabit the fables are not undif-
ferentiated predators. The lion and the wolf are always ferocious, but the smaller
animals, the nightingales, lambs, and chickens, are always victims.
The pervasive theme of the Fables—insofar as so heterogeneous a collection
can be said to have a theme—is power, the war of those who have it upon
those who do not, the strategies that the powerful employ to dominate the
powerless, and those that the powerless employ to resist that dominance. This
theme is stated most nakedly in such fables as 12: “The Cat and the Cock,”
and 221: “The Wolf and the Lamb.” In both, a powerful predator proposes
596
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 596
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Document. C#.NET extract image from multiple page adobe PDF file library for Visual Studio .NET. C#: Select All Images from One PDF Page. C#
delete a page from a pdf in preview; delete pdf pages in reader
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET Project. A Visual Studio .NET PDF SDK library, able to perform image extraction from multiple page adobe PDF file in VB.NET.
delete page on pdf reader; delete page pdf acrobat reader
to eat a powerless victim, and despite rational arguments against such an
action, the predator eats the victim anyway. As the wolf says in “The Wolf
and the Lamb,” “Whatever you say to justify yourself, I will eat you all the
same,” and he does.
Plato, in his dialogue Phaedo, reports that Socrates had Aesop’s fables very
much on his mind during his last days in prison, awaiting execution by poi-
soning for religious heresy and “corrupting the youth.” When Socrates’ fet-
ters were removed on the day of his death, he commented on how closely
pleasure is linked with pain and wondered how Aesop would have composed
a fable on the subject. Then he told his friend that he had spent much of
his time in prison turning Aesop’s fables into verse. A recurring dream had
told him to turn from philosophy to music, and Socrates tells his auditors,
I thought that it would be safer to acquit my conscience by creating
poetry in obedience to the dream before I departed. So . . . I turned
such fables of Aesop as I knew, and had ready to my hand, into verse
.. . for I reflected that a man who means to be a poet has to use fic-
tion and not facts for his poems; and I could not invent fiction myself.
Socrates may have been drawn to Aesop by something more than his abil-
ity to make up stories. A person sentenced by an authoritarian state to die
for having told the truth may well have found a special wisdom and rele-
vance in Aesop’s fierce fables of power.
FURTHER READING
: There is no such thing as an authoritative complete works of
Aesop. As Olivia and Robert Temple, the present translators, comment, “The ‘com-
plete fables of Aesop’ is whatever the editor of its Greek text chooses to say it is.”
There have three main twentieth-century attempts to establish the most reliable texts,
by  Emile  Chambry  (1925–1926),  Ben  Edwin  Perry  (1952),  and  A.  Hausrath
(1956–1959). The Temples’ translation, 1998, of the 358 fables in Chambry’s edition
is the closest thing we have in English to a complete Aesop. Serious analyses of the
fables are scarce. Marcel Gutwirth’s Fable, 1980, is about the form in general, but he
has some useful things to say about Aesop in particular. Perry’s Aesopica, 1952, largely
consists of Greek texts, but the introductory material contains some interesting com-
mentary. Annabel Patterson’s Fables of Power: Aesopian Writing and Political History, 1991,
concentrates on political fables in England between 1575 and 1725, but her analy-
sis of the fable form and its connection with censorship has wide applicability to the
fable tradition in general.
FABLES
Translated by Olivia and Robert Temple
3
THE EAGLE AND THE FOX
An eagle and a fox, having become friends, decided to live near one another
and be neighbors. They believed that this proximity would strengthen their
friendship. So the eagle flew up and established herself on a very high branch
A
ESOP
/ Fables
597
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 597
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF: Insert PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Insert a New Page to PDF in VB.NET. Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program.
delete page pdf; delete pages on pdf
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
You can use specific APIs to copy and get a specific page of PDF file; you can also copy and paste pages from a PDF document into another PDF file.
delete pages from pdf in preview; cut pages out of pdf file
of a tree, where she made her nest. And the fox, creeping about among the
bushes which were at the foot of the same tree, made her den there, deposit-
ing her babies right beneath the eagle.
But, one day when the fox was out looking for food, the eagle, who was
very short of food too, swooped down to the bushes and took the fox cubs
up to her nest and feasted on them with her own young.
When the fox returned, she was less distressed at the death of her little
ones than she was driven mad by frustration at the impossibility of ever effec-
tively avenging herself. For she, a land animal [chersaia], could never hope
to pursue a winged bird. She had no option but to content herself, in her
powerlessness and feebleness, with cursing her enemy from afar.
Now it was not long afterwards that the eagle did actually receive her
punishment for her crime against her friend.
Some men were sacrificing a goat in the countryside and the eagle swooped
down on the altar, carrying off some burning entrails, which she took up to
her nest. A strong wind arose which blew the fire from the burning entrails
into some old straw that was in the nest. The eaglets were singed and, as they
were not yet able to fly, when they leaped from the nest they fell to the ground.
The fox rushed up and devoured them all in front of the eagle’s eyes.
This story shows that if you betray friendship, you may evade the vengeance of those
whom you wrong if they are weak, but ultimately you cannot escape the vengeance
of heaven.1
8
THE NIGHTINGALE AND THE HAWK
A nightingale, perched on a tall oak, was singing as usual when a hawk saw
her. He was very hungry, so he swooped down upon her and seized her. Seeing
herself about to die, the nightingale pleaded to the hawk to let her go, say-
ing she was not a sizeable enough meal and would never fill the stomach of
a hawk, and that if he were hungry he ought to find some bigger birds. But
the hawk replied:
“I would certainly be foolish if I let a meal go which I already have in my
talons to run after something else which I haven’t yet seen.”
Men are foolish who, in hope of greater things, let those which they have in their
grasp escape.1
598
The Ancient World
1
This fable is told in verse by the poet Archilochus (eighth or seventh century 
B
.
C
.) and
also referred to by Aristophanes in 414 
B
.
C
.in The Birds (651), where it is attributed to Aesop.
(Notes to Aesop are by the translators.)
1
A different fable of “The Hawk and the Nightingale” is related by the poet Hesiod (circa
700 
B
.
C
.) in his Works and Days (201–210). In that fable the hawk has seized the nightingale,
and, as he carries her high up among the clouds, he tells the nightingale she should not cry
out or resist his superior might, for: “He is a fool who tries to withstand the stronger, for he
does not get the mastery and suffers pain besides his shame.” The old fable clearly antedates
the time of Aesop, and perhaps he or another wrote a fable with the same characters because
they were familiar. Two points particularly noteworthy about the fable recounted by Hesiod
are that it clearly preceded him and that it had a clear moral appended to it, showing that
this practice of appending morals to animal fables was very ancient.
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 598
12
THE CAT AND THE COCK
A cat who had caught a cock wanted to give a plausible reason for devour-
ing it. So she accused it of annoying people by crowing at night and dis-
turbing their sleep.
The cock defended himself by saying that he did it to be helpful. For, if
he woke people up, it was to summon them to their accustomed work.
Then the cat produced another grievance and accused the cock of insult-
ing Nature by his relationship with his mother and sisters.
The cock replied that in this also he was serving his master’s interests,
since it was thanks to this that the chickens laid lots of eggs.
“Ah well!” cried the cat, “I’m not going to go without food just because
you can produce a lot of justifications!” And she ate the cock.
This fable shows that someone with a wicked nature who is determined to do wrong,
when he cannot do so in the guise of a good man, does his evil deeds openly.
20
THE TWO COCKS AND THE EAGLE
Two cockerels were fighting over some hens. One triumphed and saw the
other off. The defeated one then withdrew into a thicket where he hid him-
self. The victor fluttered up into the air and sat atop a high wall, where he
began to crow with a loud voice.
Straight away an eagle fell upon him and carried him off. And, from then
on, the cockerel hidden in the shadows possessed all the hens at his leisure.
This fable shows that the Lord resisteth the proud but giveth grace unto the humble.1
21
THE COCKS AND THE PARTRIDGE
A man who kept some cocks at his house, having found a partridge for sale
privately, bought it and took it back home with him to feed it along with
the cocks. But, as the cocks pecked it and pursued it, the partridge, with
heavy heart, imagined that this rejection was because she was of a foreign
race.
A
ESOP
/ Fables
599
1
This moral, which calls the fable by the late term mythos, uses the term Kyrios (Lord) which,
though it was used in inscriptions to Zeus and other Greek deities, is used as an epithet for
both God and Jesus in the Christian gospels. S. A. Handford pointed out that the moral was
the same as a passage in the New Testament Epistle to James (iv.6). We have accordingly quoted
the relevant words from the King James Bible. Handford believed that this moral was appended
by a Christian, which is probably more likely than that the Epistle to James was quoting a pop-
ular maxim derived from an edition of Aesop.
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 599
However, a little while later, having seen that the cocks fought among them-
selves as well and never stopped until they drew blood, she said to herself:
“I’m not going to complain at being attacked by these cocks any longer,
because I see that they do not have any mercy on each other either.”
This fable shows that sensible men easily tolerate the outrages of their neighbors when
they see that the latter do not even spare their parents.
32
THE FOX AND THE BUNCH OF GRAPES
A famished fox, seeing some bunches of grapes hanging [from a vine which
had grown] in a tree, wanted to take some, but could not reach them. So
he went away saying to himself:
“Those are unripe.”
Similarly, certain people, not being able to run their affairs well because of their inef-
ficiency, blame the circumstances.
1
40
THE FOX AND THE BILLY-GOAT
A fox, having fallen into a well, was faced with the prospect of being stuck
there. But then a billy-goat came along to that same well because he was
thirsty and saw the fox. He asked him if the water was good.
The fox decided to put a brave face on it and gave a tremendous speech
about how wonderful the water was down there, so very excellent. So the
billy-goat climbed down the well, thinking only of his thirst. When he had
had a good drink, he asked the fox what he thought was the best way to get
back up again.
The fox said:
“Well, I have a very good way to do that. Of course, it will mean our work-
ing together. If you just push your front feet up against the wall and hold
your horns up in the air as high as you can, I will climb up on to them, get
out, and then I can pull you up behind me.”
The billy-goat willingly consented to this idea, and the fox briskly clam-
bered up the legs, the shoulders, and finally the horns of his companion.
He found himself at the mouth of the well, pulled himself out, and imme-
diately scampered off. The billy-goat shouted after him, reproaching him
for breaking their agreement of mutual assistance. The fox came back to
the top of the well and shouted down to the billy-goat:
600
The Ancient World
1
This famous fable gave rise to the common English expression “sour grapes.” Omphakes
can mean “sour,” but it is more accurate to translate it as “unripe,” since the sourness was a
result of the unripeness, and when Greeks used the word to describe grapes they were usu-
ally referring to their unripe state rather than to their taste. The same word was used to describe
girls who had not yet reached sexual maturity.
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 600
“Ha! If you had as many brains as you have hairs on your chin, you
wouldn’t have got down there in the first place without thinking of how
you were going to get out again.”
It is thus that sensible men should not undertake any action without having first
examined the end result.
52
THE MIDDLE-AGED MAN AND HIS MISTRESSES
A middle-aged man who was going gray had two mistresses, one young and
the other old. Now she who was advanced in years had a sense of shame
at having sexual intercourse with a lover younger than herself. And so she
did not fail, each time that he came to her house, to pull out all of his
black hairs.
The young mistress, on her part, recoiled from the idea of having an old
lover, and so she pulled out his white hairs.
Thus it happened that, plucked in turn by the one and then the other,
he became bald.
That which is ill-matched always gets into difficulties.
1
53
THE SHIPWRECKED MAN
A rich Athenian was sailing with some other travellers. A violent tempest sud-
denly arose, and the boat capsized. Then, while the other passengers were
trying to save themselves by swimming, the Athenian continually invoked the
aid of the goddess Athena [patroness of his city], and promised offering after
offering if only she would save him.
One of his shipwrecked companions, who swam beside him, said to him:
“Appeal to Athena by all means, but also move your arms!”
We also invoke the gods, but we mustn’t forget to put in our own efforts to save our-
selves. We count ourselves lucky if, in making our own efforts, we obtain the pro-
tection of the gods. But if we abandon ourselves to our fate, the daimons alone can
save us.1
A
ESOP
/ Fables
601
1
A hetaira was a “female companion,” a courtesan or concubine, as opposed to a legal wife.
The English word “mistress” does not adequately convey the full social meaning if we wish
to be precise about ancient Greek society. Similarly, the man is described as a mesopolios, a
form of mesaipolios, which means “half-gray” but is also the word used by association to mean
“middle-aged” in Greek.
1
The daimons were semidivine beings intermediate between men and the gods, who might
come to the aid of men from time to time if whimsy took them, or they might even be per-
suaded by promises of offerings.
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 601
59
THE MAN AND THE LION TRAVELLING TOGETHER
A man and a lion were travelling along together one day when they began
to argue about which of them was the stronger. Just then they passed a stone
statue representing a man strangling a lion.
“There, you see, we are stronger than you,” said the man, pointing it out
to the lion.
But the lion smiled and replied:
“If lions could make statues, you would see plenty of men under the paws
of lions.”
Many people boast of how brave and fearless they are, but when put to the test are
exposed as frauds.
65
THE ASTRONOMER
The astronomer was in the habit of going out every evening to look at the
stars. Then, one night when he was in the suburbs absorbed in contem-
plating the sky, he accidentally fell into a well. A passer-by heard him moan-
ing and calling out. When the man realized what had happened, he called
down to him:
“Hey, you there! You are so keen to see what is up in the sky that you
don’t see what is down here on the ground!”
One could apply this fable to men who boast of doing wonders and who are inca-
pable of carrying out the everyday things of life.
73
THE NORTH WIND AND THE SUN
The North Wind [Boreas] and the Sun had a contest of strength. They decided
to allot the palm of victory to whichever of them could strip the clothes off
a traveller.
The North Wind tried first. He blew violently. As the man clung on to
his clothes, the North Wind attacked him with greater force. But the man,
uncomfortable from the cold, put on more clothes. So, disheartened, the
North Wind left him to the Sun.
The Sun now shone moderately, and the man removed his extra cloak
[himation]. Then the Sun darted beams which were more scorching until
602
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 602
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested