c# open a pdf file : Delete pages out of a pdf Library SDK class asp.net .net winforms ajax The-Odyssey-Greek-Translation7-part1264

visible as the shipman Dymas’ daughter,
a girl the princess’ age, and her dear friend.
In this form grey-eyed Athena said to her:
“How so remiss, and yet thy mother’s daughter?
30
leaving thy clothes uncared for, Nausikaa,
when soon thou must have store of marriage linen,
and put thy minstrelsy in wedding dress!
Beauty, in these, will make folk admire,
and bring thy father and gentle mother joy.
Let us go washing in the shine of morning!
Beside thee will I drub, so wedding chests
will brim by evening. Maidenhood must end!
Have not the noblest born Phaiákians
paid court to thee, whose birth none can excel?
40
Go beg thy sovereign father, even at dawn,
to have the mule cart and the mules brought round
to take thy body-linen, gowns and mantles.
Thou shouldst ride, for it becomes thee more,
the washing pools are found so far from home.”
On this word she departed, grey-eyed Athena,
to where the gods have their eternal dwelling—
as men say—in the fastness of Olympos.
Never a tremor of wind, or a splash of rain,
no errant snowflake comes to stain that heaven,
50
so calm, so vaporless, the world of light.
Here, where the gay gods live their days of pleasure,
the grey-eyed one withdrew, leaving the princess.
And now Dawn took her own fair throne, awaking
the girl in the sweet gown, still charmed by dream.
Down through the rooms she went to tell her parents,
whom she found still at home: her mother seated
near the great hearth among her maids—and twirling
out of her distaff yarn dyed like the sea—;
her father at the door, bound for a council
60
of princes on petition of the gentry.
She went up close to him and softly said:
“My dear Papà, could you not send the mule cart
around for me—the gig with pretty wheels?
I must take all our things and get them washed
at the river pools; our linen is all soiled.
And you should wear fresh clothing, going to council
with counselors and first men of the realm.
Remember your five sons at home: though two
are married, we have still three bachelor sprigs;
70
they will have none but laundered clothes each time
they go to the dancing. See what I must think of!”
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Six
343
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 343
Delete pages out of a pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages on pdf file; pdf delete page
Delete pages out of a pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page from pdf; delete page on pdf
She had no word to say of her own wedding,
though her keen father saw her blush. Said he:
“No mules would I deny you, child, nor anything.
Go along, now; the grooms will bring your gig
with pretty wheels and the cargo box upon it.”
He spoke to the stableman, who soon brought round
the cart, low-wheeled and nimble;
harnessed the mules, and backed them in their traces.
80
Meanwhile the girl fetched all her soiled apparel
to bundle in the polished wagon box.
Her mother, for their luncheon, packed a hamper
with picnic fare, and filled a skin of wine,
and, when the princess had been handed up,
gave her a golden bottle of olive oil
for softening girls’ bodies, after bathing.
Nausikaa took the reins and raised her whip,
lashing the mules. What jingling! What a clatter!
But off they went in a ground-covering trot,
90
with princess, maids, and laundry drawn behind.
By the lower river where the wagon came
were washing pools, with water all year flowing
in limpid spillways that no grime withstood.
The girls unhitched the mules, and sent them down
along the eddying stream to crop sweet grass.
Then sliding out the cart’s tail board, they took
armloads of clothing to the dusky water,
and trod them in the pits, making a race of it.
All being drubbed, all blemish rinsed away,
100
they spread them, piece by piece, along the beach
whose pebbles had been laundered by the sea;
then took a dip themselves, and, all anointed
with golden oil, ate lunch beside the river
while the bright burning sun dried out their linen.
Princess and maids delighted in that feast;
then, putting off their veils,
they ran and passed a ball to a rhythmic beat,
Nausikaa flashing first with her white arms.
So Artemis goes flying after her arrows flown
110
down some tremendous valley-side—
Taÿgetos, Erymanthos—
chasing the mountain goats or ghosting deer,
with nymphs of the wild places flanking her;
and Lêto’s
3
heart delights to see them running,
for, taller by a head than nymphs can be,
3
Mother of Artemis, goddess of the hunt. Taÿgetos and Erymanthos are mountainous places
in Greece.
344
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 344
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in .NET
delete pages from pdf preview; add and remove pages from pdf file online
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET can view PDF document in single page or continue pages. Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete pages in pdf; acrobat remove pages from pdf
the goddess shows more stately, all being beautiful.
So one could tell the princess from the maids.
Soon it was time, she knew, for riding homeward—
mules to be harnessed, linen folded smooth—
but the grey-eyed goddess Athena made her tarry,
120
so that Odysseus might behold her beauty
and win her guidance to the town.
It happened
when the king’s daughter threw her ball off line
and missed, and put it in the whirling stream,—
at which they all gave such a shout, Odysseus
awoke and sat up, saying to himself:
“Now, by my life, mankind again! But who?
Savages, are they, strangers to courtesy?
Or gentle folk, who know and fear the gods?
That was a lust cry of tall young girls—
130
most like the cry of nymphs, who haunt the peaks,
and springs of brooks, and inland grassy places.
Or am I amid people of human speech?
Up again, man; and let me see for myself.”
He pushed aside the bushes, breaking off 
with his great hand a single branch of olive, 
whose leaves might shield him in his nakedness; 
so came out rustling, like a mountain lion, 
rain-drenched, wind-buffeted, but in his might at ease, 
with burning eyes—who prowls among the herds 
140
or flocks, or after game, his hungry belly 
taking him near stout homesteads for his prey. 
Odysseus had this look, in his rough skin 
advancing on the girls with pretty braids; 
and he was driven on by hunger, too. 
Streaked with brine, and swollen, he terrified them, 
so that they fled, this way and that. Only 
Alkínoös’ daughter stood her ground, being given 
a bold heart by Athena, and steady knees.
She faced him, waiting. And Odysseus came, 
150
debating inwardly what he should do: 
embrace this beauty’s knees in supplication? 
or stand apart, and, using honeyed speech, 
inquire the way to town, and beg some clothing? 
In his swift reckoning, he thought it best 
to trust in words to please her—and keep away; 
he might anger the girl, touching her knees. 
So he began, and let the soft words fall:
“Mistress: please: are you divine, or mortal? 
If one of those who dwell in the wide heaven, 
160
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Six
345
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 345
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in .NET WinForms. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
best pdf editor delete pages; delete pdf pages ipad
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. can view PDF document in single page or continue pages. Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
cut pages from pdf reader; delete pdf page acrobat
you are most near to Artemis, I should say—
great Zeus’s daughter—in your grace and presence. 
If you are one of earth’s inhabitants, 
how blest your father, and your gentle mother, 
blest all your kin. I know what happiness 
must send the warm tears to their eyes, each time 
they see their wondrous child go to the dancing! 
But one man’s destiny is more than blest—
he who prevails, and takes you as his bride. 
Never have I laid eyes on equal beauty 
170
in man or woman. I am hushed indeed. 
So fair, one time, I thought a young palm tree 
at Delos4 near the altar of Apollo—
I had troops under me when I was there 
on the sea route that later brought me grief—
but that slim palm tree filled my heart with wonder: 
never came shoot from earth so beautiful. 
So now, my lady, I stand in awe so great 
I cannot take your knees. And yet my case is desperate: 
twenty days, yesterday, in the winedark sea,
180
on the ever-lunging swell, under gale winds, 
getting away from the Island of Og´ygia. 
And now the terror of Storm has left me stranded 
upon this shore—with more blows yet to suffer, 
I must believe, before the gods relent. 
Mistress, do me a kindness! 
After much weary toil, I come to you, 
and you are the first soul I have seen—I know 
no others here. Direct me to the town, 
give me a rag that I can throw around me, 
190
some cloth or wrapping that you brought along. 
And may the gods accomplish your desire: 
a home, a husband, and harmonious 
converse with him—the best thing in the world 
being a strong house held in serenity 
where man and wife agree. Woe to their enemies, 
joy to their friends! But all this they know best.”
Then she of the white arms, Nausikaa, replied:
“Stranger, there is no quirk or evil in you 
that I can see. You know Zeus metes out fortune 
200
to good and bad men as it pleases him. 
Hardship he sent to you, and you must bear it. 
But now that you have taken refuge here 
you shall not lack for clothing, or any other 
comfort due to a poor man in distress. 
4An island in the Aegean Sea, birthplace of Apollo and sacred to him.
346
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 346
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete page pdf file reader; delete page from pdf online
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete pages on pdf; delete pages of pdf online
The town lies this way, and the men are called 
Phaiákians, who own the land and city. 
I am daughter to the Prince Alkínoös, 
by whom the power of our people stands.” 
Turning, she called out to her maids-in-waiting:
210
“Stay with me! Does the sight of a man scare you? 
Or do you take this one for an enemy? 
Why, there’s no fool so brash, and never will be, 
as to bring war or pillage to this coast, 
for we are dear to the immortal gods, 
living here, in the sea that rolls forever, 
distant from other lands and other men. 
No: this man is a castaway, poor fellow; 
we must take care of him. Strangers and beggars 
come from Zeus: a small gift, then, is friendly. 
220
Give our new guest some food and drink, and take him 
into the river, out of the wind, to bathe.”
They stood up now, and called to one another 
to go on back. Quite soon they led Odysseus 
under the river bank, as they were bidden; 
and there laid out a tunic, and a cloak, 
and gave him olive oil in the golden flask.
“Here,” they said, “go bathe in the flowing water.” 
But heard now from that kingly man, Odysseus:
“Maids,” he said, “keep away a little; let me 
230
wash the brine from my own back, and rub on 
plenty of oil. It is long since my anointing. 
I take no bath, however, where you can see me—
naked before young girls with pretty braids.”
They left him, then, and went to tell the princess. 
And now Odysseus, dousing in the river, 
scrubbed the coat of brine from back and shoulders 
and rinsed the clot of sea-spume from his hair; 
got himself all rubbed down, from head to foot, 
then he put on the clothes the princess gave him. 
240
Athena lent a hand, making him seem 
taller, and massive too, with crisping hair 
in curls like petals of wild hyacinth, 
but all red-golden. Think of gold infused 
on silver by a craftsman, whose fine art 
Hephaistos taught him, or Athena: one 
whose work moves to delight: just so she lavished 
beauty over Odysseus’ head and shoulders. 
Then he went down to sit on the sea beach 
in his new splendor. There the girl regarded him, 
250
and after a time she said to the maids beside her:
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Six
347
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 347
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
installed. Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in VB.NET. VB.NET: Replace Text in Consecutive PDF Pages. Demo
delete page numbers in pdf; add and delete pages in pdf online
C# PDF Image Redact Library: redact selected PDF images in C#.net
Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET NET control allows users to black out image in PDF
acrobat extract pages from pdf; delete pages on pdf online
“My gentlewomen, I have a thing to tell you. 
The Olympian gods cannot be all averse 
to this man’s coming here among our islanders. 
Uncouth he seemed, I thought so, too, before; 
but now he looks like one of heaven’s people. 
I wish my husband could be fine as he 
and glad to stay forever on Skhería! 
But have you given refreshment to our guest?”
At this the maids, all gravely listening, hastened 
260
to set out bread and wine before Odysseus, 
and ah! how ravenously that patient man 
took food and drink, his long fast at an end.
The princess Nausikaa now turned aside 
to fold her linens; in the pretty cart 
she stowed them, put the mule team under harness, 
mounted the driver’s seat, and then looked down 
to say with cheerful prompting to Odysseus:
“Up with you now, friend; back to town we go; 
and I shall send you in before my father 
270
who is wondrous wise; there in our house with him 
you’ll meet the noblest of the Phaiákians.
You have good sense, I think; here’s how to do it: 
while we go through the countryside and farmland 
stay with my maids, behind the wagon, walking 
briskly enough to follow where I lead. 
But near the town—well, there’s a wall with towers 
around the Isle, and beautiful ship basins 
right and left of the causeway of approach; 
seagoing craft are beached beside the road 
280
each on its launching ways. The agora,5
with fieldstone benches bedded in the earth, 
lies either side Poseidon’s shrine—for there 
men are at work on pitch-black hulls and rigging, 
cables and sails, and tapering of oars. 
The archer’s craft is not for the Phaiákians, 
but ship designing, modes of oaring cutters 
in which they love to cross the foaming sea. 
From these fellows I will have no salty talk, 
no gossip later. Plenty are insolent. 
290
And some seadog might say, after we passed: 
‘Who is this handsome stranger trailing Nausikaa? 
Where did she find him? Will he be her husband? 
Or is she being hospitable to some rover 
come off his ship from lands across the sea—
there being no lands nearer. A god, maybe? 
5
Public meeting place.
348
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 348
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
VB.NET extract PDF pages, VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET PDF Viewer, such as rotate PDF page and zoom in or zoom out PDF page.
delete pages from a pdf document; delete a page from a pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files.
cut pages from pdf file; delete page pdf online
a god from heaven, the answer to her prayer, 
descending now—to make her his forever? 
Better, if she’s roamed and found a husband 
somewhere else: none of our own will suit her, 
300
though many come to court her, and those the best.’ 
This is the way they might make light of me. 
And I myself should hold it shame 
for any girl to flout her own dear parents, 
taking up with a man, before her marriage.
Note well, now, what I say, friend, and your chances 
are excellent for safe conduct from my father. 
You’ll find black poplars in a roadside park 
around a meadow and fountain—all Athena’s—
but Father has a garden in the place—
310
this within earshot of the city wall. 
Go in there and sit down, giving us time 
to pass through town and reach my father’s house. 
And when you can imagine we’re at home, 
then take the road into the city, asking 
directions to the palace of Alkínoös. 
You’ll find it easily: any small boy 
can take you there; no family has a mansion 
half so grand as he does, being king.
As soon as you are safe inside, cross over 
320
and go straight through into the mégaron
6
to find my mother. She’ll be there in firelight 
before a column, with her maids in shadow, 
spinning a wool dyed richly as the sea. 
My father’s great chair faces the fire, too; 
there like a god he sits and takes his wine. 
Go past him; cast yourself before my mother, 
embrace her knees—and you may wake up soon 
at home rejoicing, though your home be far. 
On Mother’s feeling much depends; if she 
330
looks on you kindly, you shall see your friends 
under your own roof in your father’s country.”
At this she raised her glistening whip, lashing 
the team into a run; they left the river 
cantering beautifully, then trotted smartly. 
But then she reined them in, and spared the whip, 
so that her maids could follow with Odysseus. 
The sun was going down when they went by 
Athena’s grove. Here, then, Odysseus rested, 
and lifted up his prayer to Zeus’s daughter:
340
6
The great hall of the house. 
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Six
349
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 349
“Hear me, unwearied child of royal Zeus! 
O listen to me now—thou so aloof 
while the Earthshaker wrecked and battered me. 
May I find love and mercy among these people.”
He prayed for that, and Pallas Athena heard him—
although in deference to her father’s brother7
she would not show her true form to Odysseus, 
at whom Poseidon smoldered on 
until the kingly man came home to his own shore.
BOOK SEVEN: GARDENS AND FIRELIGHT
As Lord Odysseus prayed there in the grove 
the girl rode on, behind her strapping team, 
and came late to the mansion of her father, 
where she reined in at the courtyard gate. Her brothers 
awaited her like tall gods in the court, 
circling to lead the mules away and carry 
the laundered things inside. But she withdrew 
to her own bedroom, where a fire soon shone, 
kindled by her old nurse, Eurymedousa. 
Years ago, from a raid on the continent,
10
the rolling ships had brought this woman over 
to be Alkínoös’ share—fit spoil for him 
whose realm hung on his word as on a god’s. 
And she had schooled the princess, Nausikaa, 
whose fire she tended now, making her supper.
Odysseus, when the time had passed, arose 
and turned into the city. But Athena 
poured a sea fog around him as he went—
her love’s expedient, that no jeering sailor 
should halt the man or challenge him for luck. 
20
Instead, as he set foot in the pleasant city, 
the grey-eyed goddess came to him, in figure 
a small girl child, hugging a water jug.
Confronted by her, Lord Odysseus asked:
“Little one, could you take me to the house 
of that Alkínoös, king among these people? 
You see, I am a poor old stranger here; 
my home is far away; here there is no one 
known to me, in countryside or city.”
7
Poseidon, brother of Athena’s father, Zeus.
350
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 350
The grey-eyed goddess Athena replied to him:
30
“Oh, yes, good grandfer, sir, I know, I’ll show you 
the house you mean; it is quite near my father’s. 
But come now, hush, like this, and follow me. 
You must not stare at people, or be inquisitive. 
They do not care for strangers in this neighborhood; 
a foreign man will get no welcome here. 
The only things they trust are the racing ships 
Poseidon gave, to sail the deep blue sea 
like white wings in the sky, or a flashing thought.”
Pallas Athena turned like the wind, running 
40
ahead of him, and he followed in her footsteps. 
And no seafaring men of Phaiákia 
perceived Odysseus passing through their town: 
the awesome one in pigtails barred their sight 
with folds of sacred mist. And yet Odysseus 
gazed out marvelling at the ships and harbors, 
public squares, and ramparts towering up 
with pointed palisades along the top. 
When they were near the mansion of the king, 
grey-eyed Athena in the child cried out:
50
“Here it is, grandfer, sir—that mansion house 
you asked to see. You’ll find our king and queen 
at supper, but you must not be dismayed; 
go in to them. A cheerful man does best
in every enterprise—even a stranger.
You’ll see our lady just inside the hall—
her name is Arêtê; her grandfather
was our good king Alkínoös’s father—
Nausithoös by name, son of Poseidon
and Periboia. That was a great beauty,
60
the daughter of Eurymedon, commander
of the Gigantês
1
in the olden days, 
who led those wild things to their doom and his.
Poseidon then made love to Periboia,
and she bore Nausíthoös, Phaiákia’s lord,
whose sons in turn were Rhêxênor and Alkínoös.
Rhêxênor had no sons; even as a bridegroom
he fell before the silver bow of Apollo,
his only child a daughter, Arêtê.
When she grew up, Alkínoös married her
70
and holds her dear. No lady in the world,
no other mistress of a man’s household,
is honored as our mistress is, and loved,
by her own children, by Alkínoös,
1
The Giants, enormous semihuman beings, offspring of Ge, an ancient earth goddess.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Seven
351
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 351
and by the people. When she walks the town
they murmur and gaze, as though she were a goddess.
No grace or wisdom fails in her; indeed
just men in quarrels come to her for equity.
Supposing, then, she looks upon you kindly,
the chances are that you shall see your friends
80
under your own roof, in your father’s country.”
At this the grey-eyed goddess Athena left him 
and left that comely land, going over sea 
to Marathon, to the wide roadways of Athens 
and her retreat in the stronghold of Erekhtheus.2
Odysseus, now alone before the palace, 
meditated a long time before crossing 
the brazen threshold of the great courtyard. 
High rooms he saw ahead, airy and luminous 
as though with lusters of the sun and moon, 
90
bronze-paneled walls, at several distances, 
making a vista, with an azure molding 
of lapis lazuli.
3
The doors were golden 
guardians of the great room. Shining bronze 
plated the wide door sill; the posts and lintel 
were silver upon silver; golden handles 
curved on the doors, and golden, too, and silver 
were sculptured hounds, flanking the entrance way,
cast by the skill and ardor of Hephaistos 
to guard the prince Alkínoös’s house—
100
undying dogs that never could grow old. 
Through all the rooms, as far as he could see, 
tall chairs were placed around the walls, and strewn 
with fine embroidered stuff made by the women. 
Here were enthroned the leaders of Phaiákia 
drinking and dining, with abundant fare. 
Here, too, were boys of gold on pedestals 
holding aloft bright torches of pitch pine 
to light the great rooms, and the night-time feasting. 
And fifty maids-in-waiting of the household 
110
sat by the round mill, grinding yellow corn, 
or wove upon their looms, or twirled their distaffs, 
flickering like the leaves of a poplar tree;
while drops of oil glistened on linen weft.
Skillful as were the men of Phaiákia
in ship handling at sea, so were these women
skilled at the loom, having this lovely craft
and artistry as talents from Athena.
2Legendary ruler of Athens, Athena’s city. Marathon (several centuries after Homer’s time
the site of a great Greek victory over the Persians) was a plain near Athens, cherished by Athena.
3Fine blue stone.
352
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 352
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested