c# open a pdf file : Delete pages on pdf file SDK control project winforms azure wpf UWP The-Odyssey-Greek-Translation8-part1265

To left and right, outside, he saw an orchard 
closed by a pale—four spacious acres planted 
120
with trees in bloom or weighted down for picking: 
pear trees, pomegranates, brilliant apples, 
luscious figs, and olives ripe and dark. 
Fruit never failed upon these trees: winter 
and summer time they bore, for through the year 
the breathing Westwind ripened all in turn—
so one pear came to prime, and then another, 
and so with apples, figs, and the vine’s fruit 
empurpled in the royal vineyard there. 
Currants were dried at one end, on a platform 
130
bare to the sun, beyond the vintage arbors 
and vats the vintners trod; while near at hand 
were new grapes barely formed as the green bloom fell, 
or half-ripe clusters, faintly coloring. 
After the vines came rows of vegetables 
of all the kinds that flourish in every season, 
and through the garden plots and orchard ran 
channels from one clear fountain, while another 
gushed through a pipe under the courtyard entrance 
to serve the house and all who came for water. 
140
These were the gifts of heaven to Alkínoös.
Odysseus, who had borne the barren sea, 
stood in the gateway and surveyed this bounty. 
He gazed his fill, then swiftly he went in. 
The lords and nobles of Phaiákia 
were tipping wine to the wakeful god, to Hermês—
a last libation before going to bed—
but down the hall Odysseus went unseen, 
still in the cloud Athena cloaked him in, 
until he reached Arêtê, and the king. 
150
He threw his great hands round Arêtê’s knees, 
whereon the sacred mist curled back; 
they saw him; and the diners hushed amazed 
to see an unknown man inside the palace. 
Under their eyes Odysseus made his plea:
“Arêtê, admirable Rhêxênor’s daughter, 
here is a man bruised by adversity, thrown 
upon your mercy and the king your husband’s, 
begging indulgence of this company—
may the gods’ blessing rest on them! May life 
160
be kind to all! Let each one leave his children 
every good thing this realm confers upon him! 
But grant me passage to my father land. 
My home and friends lie far. My life is pain.”
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Seven
353
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 353
Delete pages on pdf file - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete a page in a pdf file; copy pages from pdf into new pdf
Delete pages on pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page from pdf preview; delete blank pages in pdf files
He moved, then, toward the fire, and sat him down 
amid the ashes. No one stirred or spoke 
until Ekhenêos broke the spell—an old man, 
eldest of the Phaiákians, an oracle, 
versed in the laws and manners of old time. 
He rose among them now and spoke out kindly:
170
“Alkínoös, this will not pass for courtesy: 
a guest abased in ashes at our hearth? 
Everyone here awaits your word; so come, then, 
lift the man up; give him a seat of honor, 
a silver-studded chair. Then tell the stewards 
we’ll have another wine bowl for libation 
to Zeus, lord of the lightning—advocate 
of honorable petitioners. And supper 
may be supplied our friend by the larder mistress.”
Alkínoös, calm in power, heard him out, 
180
then took the great adventurer by the hand 
and led him from the fire. Nearest his throne 
the son whom he loved best, Laódamas, 
had long held place; now the king bade him rise 
and gave his shining chair to Lord Odysseus. 
A serving maid poured water for his hands 
from a gold pitcher into a silver bowl, 
and spead a polished table at his side; 
the mistress of provisions came with bread 
and other victuals, generous with her store. 
190
So Lord Odysseus drank, and tasted supper. 
Seeing this done, the king in majesty 
said to his squire:
“A fresh bowl, Pontónoös;
we make libation to the lord of lightning, 
who seconds honorable petitioners.”
Mixing the honey-hearted wine, Pontónoös 
went on his rounds and poured fresh cups for all, 
whereof when all had spilt they drank their fill. 
Alkínoös then spoke to the company:
“My lords and leaders of Phaiákia: 
200
hear now, all that my heart would have me say. 
Our banquet’s ended, so you may retire; 
but let our seniors gather in the morning 
to give this guest a festal day, and make 
fair offerings to the gods. In due course we 
shall put our minds upon the means at hand 
to take him safely, comfortably, well 
and happily, with speed, to his own country, 
354
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 354
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Deleting Pages. You may feel free to define some continuous PDF pages and delete. Certainly, random pages can be deleted from PDF file as well. Sorting Pages.
delete pdf pages android; delete pdf pages online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pdf pages reader; delete pages of pdf
distant though it may lie. And may no trouble 
come to him here or on the way; his fate 
210
he shall pay out at home, even as the Spinners4
spun for him on the day his mother bore him.
If, as may be, he is some god, come down 
from heaven’s height, the gods are working strangely:
until now, they have shown themselves in glory
only after great hekatombs—those figures
banqueting at our side, throned like ourselves.
Or if some traveller met them when alone
they bore no least disguise; we are their kin; Gigantês,
Kyklopês, rank no nearer gods than we.”
220
Odysseus’ wits were ready, and he replied:
“Alkínoös, you may set your mind at rest. 
Body and birth, a most unlikely god 
am I, being all of earth and mortal nature. 
I should say, rather, I am like those men 
who suffer the worst trials that you know, 
and miseries greater yet, as I might tell you—
hundreds; indeed the gods could send no more. 
You will indulge me if I finish dinner—? 
grieved though I am to say it. There’s no part 
230
of man more like a dog than brazen Belly, 
crying to be remembered—and it must be—
when we are mortal weary and sick at heart; 
and that is my condition. Yet my hunger 
drives me to take this food, and think no more 
of my afflictions. Belly must be filled.
Be equally impelled, my lords, tomorrow 
to berth me in a ship and send me home! 
Rough years I’ve had; now may I see once more 
my hall, my lands, my people before I die!”
240
Now all who heard cried out assent to this: 
the guest had spoken well; he must have passage. 
Then tipping wine they drank their thirst away, 
and one by one went homeward for the night. 
So Lord Odysseus kept his place alone 
with Arêtê and the king Alkínoös 
beside him, while the maids went to and fro 
clearing away the wine cups and the tables. 
Presently the ivory-skinned lady 
turned to him—for she knew his cloak and tunic 
250
to be her own fine work, done with her maids—
and arrowy came her words upon the air:
4The Fates, mythological women who determined the span of a human life by spinning,
measuring, and cutting the thread symbolic of it.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Seven
355
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 355
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Moreover, you may use the following VB.NET demo code to insert multiple pages of a PDF file to a PDFDocument object at user-defined position.
delete page pdf file; delete pages out of a pdf
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
note, PDF file will be divided from the previous page of your defined page number which starts from 0. For example, your original PDF file contains 4 pages.
delete page on pdf document; delete a page from a pdf in preview
“Friend, I, for one, have certain questions for you. 
Who are you, and who has given you this clothing? 
Did you not say you wandered here by sea?”
The great tactician carefully replied:
“Ah, majesty, what labor it would be 
to go through the whole story! All my years 
of misadventures, given by those on high! 
But this you ask about is quickly told: 
260
in mid-ocean lies Og´ygia, the island 
haunt of Kalypso, Atlas’ guileful daughter, 
a lovely goddess and a dangerous one. 
No one, no god or man, consorts with her; 
but supernatural power brought me there 
to be her solitary guest: for Zeus 
let fly with his bright bolt and split my ship, 
rolling me over in the winedark sea. 
There all my shipmates, friends were drowned, while I 
hung on the keelboard of the wreck and drifted
270
nine full days. Then in the dead of night
the gods brought me ashore upon Og´ygia
into her hands. The enchantress in her beauty
fed and caressed me, promised me I should be
immortal, youthful, all the days to come;
but in my heart I never gave consent
though seven years detained. Immortal clothing
I had from her, and kept it wet with tears.
Then came the eighth year on the wheel of heaven
and word to her from Zeus, or a change of heart,
280
so that she now commanded me to sail,
sending me out to sea on a craft I made
with timber and tools of hers. She gave me stores,
victuals and wine, a cloak divinely woven,
and made a warm land breeze come up astern. 
Seventeen days I sailed in the open water
before I saw your country’s shore, a shadow
upon the sea rim. Then my heart rejoiced—
pitiable as I am! For blows aplenty
awaited me from the god who shakes the earth. 
290
Cross gales he blew, making me lose my bearings,
and heaved up seas beyond imagination—
huge and foundering seas. All I could do
was hold hard, groaning under every shock,
until my craft broke up in the hurricane.
I kept afloat and swam your sea, or drifted,
taken by wind and current to this coast
where I went in on big swells running landward.
But cliffs and rock shoals made that place forbidding,
356
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 356
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively will also take up too much space, glyph file unreferenced can Delete unimportant contents
delete pages pdf online; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Compress large-size PDF document of 1000+ pages to smaller one in a Delete unimportant contents: C# Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET
cut pages out of pdf online; delete page from pdf file online
so I turned back, swimming off shore, and came 
300
in the end to a river, to auspicious water,
with smooth beach and a rise that broke the wind.
I lay there where I fell till strength returned.
Then sacred night came on, and I went inland
to high ground and a leaf bed in a thicket.
Heaven sent slumber in an endless tide
submerging my sad heart among the leaves. 
That night and next day’s dawn and noon I slept; 
the sun went west; and then sweet sleep unbound me, 
when I became aware of maids—your daughter’s—
310
playing along the beach; the princess, too,
most beautiful. I prayed her to assist me,
and her good sense was perfect; one could hope
for no behavior like it from the young,
thoughtless as they most often are. But she
gave me good provender and good red wine, 
a river bath, and finally this clothing.
There is the bitter tale. These are the facts.”
But in reply Alkínoös observed:
“Friend, my child’s good judgment failed in this—
320
not to have brought you in her company home.
Once you approached her, you became her charge.”
To this Odysseus tactfully replied:
“Sir, as to that, you should not blame the princess. 
She did tell me to follow with her maids, 
but I would not. I felt abashed, and feared 
the sight would somehow ruffle or offend you. 
All of us on this earth are plagued by jealousy.”
Alkínoös’ answer was a declaration:
“Friend, I am not a man for trivial anger: 
330
better a sense of measure in everything. 
No anger here. I say that if it should please 
our father Zeus, Athena, and Apollo—
seeing the man you are, seeing your thoughts 
are my own thoughts—my daughter should be yours 
and you my son-in-law, if you remained. 
A home, lands, riches you should have from me 
if you could be contented here. If not, 
by Father Zeus, let none of our men hold you! 
On the contrary, I can assure you now 
340
of passage late tomorrow: while you sleep 
my men will row you through the tranquil night 
to your own land and home or where you please. 
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Seven
357
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 357
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF File by Number of Pages Demo Code in VB.NET. This is an VB.NET example of splitting a PDF file into multiple ones by number of pages.
add remove pages from pdf; delete pdf pages in reader
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Professional C#.NET PDF SDK for merging PDF file merging in Visual Studio .NET. Free online C#.NET source code for combining multiple PDF pages together in .NET
delete page pdf acrobat reader; delete pages out of a pdf file
It may be, even, far beyond Euboia—
called most remote by seamen of our isle 
who landed there, conveying Rhadamanthos 
when he sought Títyos, the son of Gaia.5
They put about, with neither pause nor rest, 
and entered their home port the selfsame day. 
But this you, too, will see: what ships I have, 
350
how my young oarsmen send the foam a-scudding!”
Now joy welled up in the patient Lord Odysseus 
who said devoutly in the warmest tones:
“O Father Zeus, let all this be fulfilled 
as spoken by Alkínoös! Earth of harvests 
remember him! Return me to my homeland!”
In this manner they conversed with one another; 
but the great lady called her maids, and sent them 
to make a kingly bed, with purple rugs 
piled up, and sheets outspread, and fleecy 
360
coverlets, in an eastern colonnade. 
The girls went out with torches in their hands, 
swift at their work of bedmaking; returning 
they whispered at the lord Odysseus’ shoulder:
“Sir, you may come; your bed has been prepared.”
How welcome the word “bed” came to his ears! 
Now, then, Odysseus laid him down and slept 
in luxury under the Porch of Morning, 
while in his inner chamber Alkínoös 
retired to rest where his dear consort lay. 
370
BOOK EIGHT: THE SONGS OF THE HARPER
Under the opening fingers of the dawn 
Alkínoös, the sacred prince, arose, 
and then arose Odysseus, raider of cities. 
As the king willed, they went down by the shipways 
to the assembly ground of the Phaiákians. 
Side by side the two men took their ease there 
on smooth stone benches. Meanwhile Pallas Athena 
roamed through the byways of the town, contriving 
Odysseus’ voyage home—in voice and feature 
5
The lines “It may be . . . Gaia” are somewhat obscure, since Rhadamanthos is pictured in
Book IV as dwelling in Elysion, and Títyos, in Book XI, is punished in Hades. The main point
is clear, though: Alkínoös is boasting of the nautical range and speed of his seafaring people.
Euboia is an island east of Greece. Gaia is another name for Ge, the earth deity.
358
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 358
the crier of the king Alkínoös 
10
who stopped and passed the word to every man:
“Phaiákian lords and counselors, this way! 
Come to assembly: learn about the stranger, 
the new guest at the palace of Alkínoös—
a man the sea drove, but a comely man; 
the gods’ own light is on him.”
She aroused them, 
and soon the assembly ground and seats were filled 
with curious men, a throng who peered and saw 
the master mind of war, Laërtês’ son. 
Athena now poured out her grace upon him, 
20
head and shoulders, height and mass—a splendor 
awesome to the eyes of the Phaiákians; 
she put him in a fettle to win the day, 
mastering every trial they set to test him. 
When all the crowd sat marshalled, quieted, 
Alkínoös addressed the full assembly:
“Hear me, lords and captains of the Phaiákians! 
Hear what my heart would have me say! 
Our guest and new friend—nameless to me still—
comes to my house after long wandering 
30
in Dawn lands, or among the Sunset races. 
Now he appeals to me for conveyance home. 
As in the past, therefore, let us provide 
passage, and quickly, for no guest of mine 
languishes here for lack of it. Look to it: 
get a black ship afloat on the noble sea, 
and pick our fastest sailer; draft a crew 
of two and fifty from our younger townsmen—
men who have made their names at sea. Loop oars 
well to your tholepins,1 lads, then leave the ship, 
40
come to our house, fall to, and take your supper: 
we’ll furnish out a feast for every crewman. 
These are your orders. As for my older peers
and princes of the realm, let them foregather 
in festival for our friend in my great hall; 
and let no man refuse. Call in our minstrel, 
Demódokos, whom God made lord of song, 
heart-easing, sing upon what theme he will.” 
He turned, led the procession, and those princes 
followed, while his herald sought the minstrel. 
50
Young oarsmen from the assembly chose a crew 
of two and fifty, as the king commanded, 
1
Pegs on the side of a boat, used as oarlocks.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Eight
359
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 359
and these filed off along the waterside 
to where the ship lay, poised above open water. 
They hauled the black hull down to ride the sea, 
rigging a mast and spar in the black ship, 
with oars at trail from corded rawhide, all 
seamanly; then tried the white sail, hoisting, 
and moored her off the beach. Then going ashore 
the crew went up to the great house of Alkínoös.
60
Here the enclosures, entrance ways, and rooms 
were filled with men, young men and old, for whom 
Alkínoös had put twelve sheep to sacrifice, 
eight tuskers
2
and a pair of shambling oxen. 
These, now, they flayed and dressed to make their banquet.
The crier soon came, leading that man of song 
whom the Muse cherished; by her gift he knew 
the good of life, and evil—
for she who lent him sweetness made him blind.3
Pontónoös fixed a studded chair for him 
70
hard by a pillar amid the banqueters, 
hanging the taut harp from a peg above him, 
and guided up his hands upon the strings; 
placed a bread basket at his side, and poured 
wine in a cup, that he might drink his fill. 
Now each man’s hand went out upon the banquet.
In time, when hunger and thirst were turned away, 
the Muse brought to the minstrel’s mind a song 
of heroes whose great fame rang under heaven: 
the clash between Odysseus and Akhilleus, 
80
how one time they contended
4
at the godfeast 
raging, and the marshal, Agamémnon, 
felt inward joy over his captains’ quarrel; 
for such had been foretold him by Apollo
at Pytho5—hallowed height—when the Akhaian 
crossed that portal of rock to ask a sign—
in the old days when grim war lay ahead 
for Trojans and Danaans, by God’s will. 
So ran the tale the minstrel sang. Odysseus 
with massive hand drew his rich mantle down 
90
over his brow, cloaking his face with it, 
to make the Phaiákians miss the secret tears 
that started to his eyes. How skillfully
he dried them when the song came to a pause!
2
Animals with tusks, such as boars.
3
According to tradition, Homer himself was blind.
4
This incident probably took place before the action of the Iliad.
5
The shrine of Apollo at Delphi, on Mount Parnassos (Parnassus); the god uttered orac-
ular pronouncements there.
360
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 360
threw back his mantle, spilt his gout of wine!
But soon the minstrel plucked his note once more
to please the Phaiákian lords, who loved the song;
then in his cloak Odysseus wept again.
His tears flowed in the mantle unperceived:
only Alkínoös, at his elbow, saw them, 
100
and caught the low groan in the man’s breathing.
At once he spoke to all the seafolk round him:
“Hear me, lords and captains of the Phaiákians.
Our meat is shared, our hearts are full of pleasure
from the clear harp tone that accords with feasting;
now for the field and track; we shall have trials
in the pentathlon.6 Let our guest go home
and tell his friends what champions we are
at boxing, wrestling, broadjump and foot racing.”
On this he led the way and all went after. 
110
The crier unslung and pegged the shining harp
and, taking Demódokos’s hand, 
led him along with all the rest—Phaiákian 
peers, gay amateurs of the great games.
They gained the common, where a crowd was forming, 
and many a young athlete now came forward
with seaside names like Tipmast, Tiderace, Sparwood,
Hullman, Sternman, Beacher and Pullerman,
Bluewater, Shearwater, Runningwake, Boardalee,
Seabelt, son of Grandfleet Shipwrightson;
120
Seareach stepped up, son of the Launching Master,
rugged as Arês,7 bane of men; his build
excelled all but the Prince Laódamas;
and Laódamas made entry with his brothers,
Halios and Klytóneus, sons of the king.
The runners, first, must have their quarter mile.
All lined up tense; then Go! and down the track
they raised the dust in a flying bunch, strung out
longer and longer behind Prince Klytóneus.
By just so far as a mule team, breaking ground, 
130
will distance oxen, he left all behind 
and came up to the crowd, an easy winner. 
Then they made room for wrestling—grinding bouts 
that Seareach won, pinning the strongest men; 
then the broadjump; first place went to Seabelt; 
Sparwood gave the discus the mightiest fling, 
and Prince Laódamas outboxed them all.
Now it was he, the son of Alkínoös, 
who said when they had run through these diversions:
6
An athletic contest consisting of five events.
7
God of war.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Eight
361
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 361
“Look here, friends, we ought to ask the stranger 
140
if he competes in something. He’s no cripple; 
look at his leg muscles and his forearms. 
Neck like a bollard;8 strong as a bull, he seems; 
and not old, though he may have gone stale under 
the rough times he had. Nothing like the sea 
for wearing out the toughest man alive.”
Then Seareach took him up at once, and said:
“Laódamas, you’re right, by all the powers. 
Go up to him, yourself, and put the question.”
At this, Alkínoös’ tall son advanced 
150
to the center ground, and there addressed Odysseus:
“Friend, Excellency, come join our competition, 
if you are practiced, as you seem to be. 
While a man lives he wins no greater honor 
than footwork and the skill of hands can bring him. 
Enter our games, then; ease your heart of trouble. 
Your journey home is not far off, remember; 
the ship is launched, the crew all primed for sea.”
Odysseus, canniest of men, replied:
“Laódamas, why do you young chaps challenge me? 
160
I have more on my mind than track and field—
hard days, and many, have I seen, and suffered. 
I sit here at your field meet, yes; but only 
as one who begs your king to send him home.”
Now Seareach put his word in, and contentiously:
“The reason being, as I see it, friend, 
you never learned a sport, and have no skill 
in any of the contests of fighting men. 
You must have been the skipper of some tramp
that crawled from one port to the next, jam full 
170
of chaffering hands: a tallier of cargoes, 
itching for gold—not, by your looks, an athlete.”
Odysseus frowned, and eyed him coldly, saying:
“That was uncalled for, friend, you talk like a fool. 
The gods deal out no gift, this one or any—
birth, brains, or speech—to every man alike. 
In looks a man may be a shade, a specter, 
and yet be master of speech so crowned with beauty 
that people gaze at him with pleasure. Courteous, 
8
A sturdy post to which a ship’s ropes were tied.
362
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 362
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested