c# open a pdf file : Delete pages from pdf in reader Library SDK class asp.net .net wpf ajax The-Odyssey-Greek-Translation9-part1266

sure of himself, he can command assemblies, 
180
and when he comes to town, the crowds gather. 
A handsome man, contrariwise, may lack 
grace and good sense in everything he says. 
You now, for instance, with your fine physique—
a god’s, indeed—you have an empty noddle.9
I find my heart inside my ribs aroused 
by your impertinence. I am no stranger 
to contests, as you fancy. I rated well 
when I could count on youth and my two hands. 
Now pain has cramped me, and my years of combat 
190
hacking through ranks in war, and the bitter sea. 
Aye. Even so I’ll give your games a trial. 
You spoke heart-wounding words. You shall be answered.”
He leapt out, cloaked as he was, and picked a discus, 
a rounded stone, more ponderous than those 
already used by the Phaiákian throwers, 
and, whirling, let it fly from his great hand 
with a low hum. The crowd went flat on the ground—
all those oar-pulling, seafaring Phaiákians—
under the rushing noise. The spinning disk 
200
soared out, light as a bird, beyond all others. 
Disguised now as a Phaiákian, Athena 
staked it and called out:
“Even a blind man,
friend, could judge this, finding with his fingers 
one discus, quite alone, beyond the cluster. 
Congratulations; this event is yours; 
not a man here can beat you or come near you.”
That was a cheering hail, Odysseus thought, 
seeing one friend there on the emulous field, 
so, in relief, he turned among the Phaiákians 
210
and said:
“Now come alongside that one, lads. 
The next I’ll send as far, I think, or farther. 
Anyone else on edge for competition 
try me now. By heaven, you angered me. 
Racing, wrestling, boxing—I bar nothing 
with any man except Laódamas, 
for he’s my host. Who quarrels with his host? 
Only a madman—or no man at all—
would challenge his protector among strangers, 
cutting the ground away under his feet. 
220
Here are no others I will not engage, 
none but I hope to know what he is made of. 
9
Head.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Eight
363
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 363
Delete pages from pdf in reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages from pdf acrobat reader; add and delete pages in pdf
Delete pages from pdf in reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page pdf; delete pages from a pdf online
Inept at combat, am I? Not entirely. 
Give me a smooth bow; I can handle it, 
and I might well be first to hit my man 
amid a swarm of enemies, though archers 
in company around me drew together. 
Philoktêtês10 alone, at Troy, when we 
Akhaians took the bow, used to outshoot me. 
Of men who now eat bread upon the earth 
230
I hold myself the best hand with a bow—
conceding mastery to the men of old, 
Heraklês, or Eur´ytos
11
of Oikhalía, 
heroes who vied with gods in bowmanship. 
Eur´ytos came to grief, it’s true; old age 
never crept over him in his long hall; 
Apollo took his challenge ill, and killed him. 
What then, the spear? I’ll plant it like an arrow. 
Only in sprinting, I’m afraid, I may 
be passed by someone. Roll of the sea waves 
240
wearied me, and the victuals in my ship 
ran low; my legs are flabby.”
When he finished, 
the rest were silent, but Alkínoös answered:
“Friend, we take your challenge in good part, 
for this man angered and affronted you 
here at our peaceful games. You’d have us note 
the prowess that is in you, and so clearly, 
no man of sense would ever cry it down! 
Come, turn your mind, now, on a thing to tell 
among your peers when you are home again, 
250
dining in hall, beside your wife and children: 
I mean our prowess, as you may remember it, 
for we, too, have our skills, given by Zeus,
and practiced from our father’s time to this—
not in the boxing ring nor the palestra12
conspicuous, but in racing, land or sea; 
and all our days we set great store by feasting, 
harpers, and the grace of dancing choirs, 
changes of dress, warm baths, and downy beds. 
O master dancers of the Phaiákians! 
260
Perform now: let our guest on his return 
tell his companions we excel the world 
in dance and song, as in our ships and running. 
10
Philoktêtês had inherited the magical bow of the fabled hero Heraklês (Hercules); a ver-
sion of his story is dramatized in Sophocles’ Philoctetes.
11
Grandson of Apollo, and Heraklês’ instructor in bowmanship. He was killed in a com-
petition with Apollo, god of archery. Eur´ytos’ bow descended to Odysseus.
12
A public athletics ground.
364
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 364
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
delete page in pdf preview; delete pages of pdf preview
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete page on pdf file; reader extract pages from pdf
Someone go find the gittern harp in hall 
and bring it quickly to Demódokos!”
At the serene king’s word, a squire ran 
to bring the polished harp out of the palace,
and place was given to nine referees—
peers of the realm, masters of ceremony—
who cleared a space and smoothed a dancing floor. 
270
The squire brought down, and gave Demódokos, 
the clear-toned harp; and centering on the minstrel 
magical young dancers formed a circle 
with a light beat, and stamp of feet. Beholding, 
Odysseus marvelled at the flashing ring.
Now to his harp the blinded minstrel sang
of Arês’ dalliance with Aphroditê:
how hidden in Hephaistos’
13
house they played
at love together, and the gifts of Arês,
dishonoring Hephaistos’ bed—and how
280
the word that wounds the heart came to the master
from Hêlios,14 who had seen the two embrace;
and when he learned it, Lord Hephaistos went
with baleful calculation to his forge.
There mightily he armed his anvil block
and hammered out a chain, whose tempered links
could not be sprung or bent; he meant that they should hold.
Those shackles fashioned, hot in wrath Hephaistos
climbed to the bower and the bed of love,
pooled all his net of chain around the bed posts
290
and swung it from the rafters overhead—
light as a cobweb even gods in bliss
could not perceive, so wonderful his cunning.
Seeing his bed now made a snare, he feigned
a journey to the trim stronghold of Lemnos,15
the dearest of earth’s towns to him. And Arês?
Ah, golden Arês’ watch had its reward 
when he beheld the great smith leaving home. 
How promptly to the famous door he came, 
intent on pleasure with sweet Kythereia!16
300
She, who had left her father’s side but now, 
sat in her chamber when her lover entered;
and tenderly he pressed her hand and said:
13
The lame god of fire and metalworking, husband of Aphroditê. 
14
The sun god.
15
An island in the Aegean, center of the worship of Hephaistos; it was there that he fell
after Zeus, during a fit of anger, threw him out of heaven.
16
Aphroditê. Also spelled Cytherea.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Eight
365
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 365
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete pdf pages in preview; delete blank page in pdf
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
delete pages in pdf reader; add or remove pages from pdf
“Come and lie down, my darling, and be happy!
Hephaistos is no longer here, but gone
to see his grunting Sintian17 friends on Lemnos.”
As she, too, thought repose would be most welcome,
the pair went in to bed—into a shower
of clever chains, the netting of Hephaistos.
So trussed, they could not move apart, nor rise,
310
at last they knew there could be no escape,
they were to see the glorious cripple now—
for Hêlios had spied for him, and told him;
so he turned back, this side of Lemnos Isle,
sick at heart, making his way homeward.
Now in the doorway of the room he stood
while deadly rage took hold of him; his voice,
hoarse and terrible, reached all the gods:
“O Father Zeus, O gods in bliss forever,
here is indecorous entertainment for you,
320
Aphroditê, Zeus’s daughter,
caught in the act, cheating me, her cripple,
with Arês—devastating Arês.
Cleanlimbed beauty is her joy, not these
bandylegs I came into the world with:
no one to blame but the two gods
18
who bred me!
Come see this pair entwining here
in my own bed! How hot it makes me burn!
I think they may not care to lie much longer,
pressing on one another, passionate lovers;
330
they’ll have enough of bed together soon.
And yet the chain that bagged them holds them down
till Father sends me back my wedding gifts—
all that I poured out for his damned pigeon,
so lovely, and so wanton.”
All the others
were crowding in, now, to the brazen house—
Poseidon who embraces earth, and Hermês
the runner, and Apollo, lord of Distance.
The goddesses stayed home for shame; but these
munificences ranged there in the doorway,
340
and irrepressible among them all
arose the laughter of the happy gods.
Gazing hard at Hephaistos’ handiwork
the gods in turn remarked among themselves:
“No dash in adultery now.”
17The Sintians, of Lemnos, had a reputation for crudity.
18Zeus and Hera.
366
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 366
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
delete page in pdf file; delete pages from pdf online
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in ASP.NET. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
delete pages from a pdf in preview; delete pages on pdf online
“The tortoise tags the hare—
Hephaistos catches Arês—and Arês outran the wind.”
“The lame god’s craft has pinned him. Now shall he
pay what is due from gods taken in cuckoldry.”
They made these improving remarks to one another,
but Apollo leaned aside to say to Hermês:
350
“Son of Zeus, beneficent Wayfinder,
would you accept a coverlet of chain, if only
you lay by Aphroditê’s golden side?”
To this the Wayfinder replied, shining:
“Would I not, though, Apollo of distances!
Wrap me in chains three times the weight of these,
come goddesses and gods to see the fun;
only let me lie beside the pale-golden one!”
The gods gave way again to peals of laughter,
all but Poseidon, and he never smiled,
360
but urged Hephaistos to unpinion Arês,
saying emphatically, in a loud voice:
“Free him:
you will be paid, I swear; ask what you will;
he pays up every jot the gods decree.”
To this the Great Gamelegs replied:
“Poseidon,
lord of the earth-surrounding sea, I should not
swear to a scoundrel’s honor. What have I
as surety from you, if Arês leaves me
empty-handed, with my empty chain?”
The Earth-shaker for answer urged again:
370
“Hephaistos, let us grant he goes, and leaves
the fine unpaid; I swear, then, I shall pay it.”
Then said the Great Gamelegs at last:
“No more:
you offer terms I cannot well refuse.”
And down the strong god bent to set them free,
till disencumbered of their bond, the chain,
the lovers leapt away—he into Thrace,
while Aphroditê, laughter’s darling, fled
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Eight
367
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 367
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
C:\test1.pdf") Dim pdf2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\test2.pdf") Dim pageindexes = New Integer() {1, 2, 4} Dim pages = pdf.DuplicatePage(pageindexes
delete pages from pdf file online; delete pages from pdf reader
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
delete page on pdf reader; cut pages from pdf reader
to Kypros Isle and Paphos,19 to her meadow
and altar dim with incense. There the Graces
380
bathed and anointed her with golden oil—
a bloom that clings upon immortal flesh alone—
and let her folds of mantle fall in glory.
So ran the song the minstrel sang.
Odysseus
listening, found sweet pleasure in the tale,
among the Phaiákian mariners and oarsmen.
And next Alkínoös called upon his sons,
Halios and Laódamas, to show
the dance no one could do as well as they—
handling a purple ball carven by Pólybos.
390
One made it shoot up under the shadowing clouds
as he leaned backward; bounding high in air
the other cut its flight far off the ground—
and neither missed a step as the ball soared.
The next turn was to keep it low, and shuttling
hard between them, while the ring of boys
gave them a steady stamping beat.
Odysseus now addressed Alkínoös:
“O majesty, model of all your folk,
your promise was to show me peerless dancers;
400
here is the promise kept. I am all wonder.”
At this Alkínoös in his might rejoicing
said to the seafarers of Phaiákia:
“Attend me now, Phaiákian lords and captains:
our guest appears a clear-eyed man and wise.
Come, let him feel our bounty as he should.
Here are twelve princes of the kingdom—lords
paramount, and I who make thirteen;
let each one bring a laundered cloak and tunic,
and add one bar of honorable gold.
410
Heap all our gifts together; load his arms;
let him go joyous to our evening feast!
As for Seareach—why, man to man
he’ll make amends, and handsomely; he blundered.”
Now all as one acclaimed the king’s good pleasure,
and each one sent a squire to bring his gifts.
Meanwhile Seareach found speech again, saying:
19
A city in ancient Cyprus (Kypros), an island south of Turkey where Aphroditê had a cult.
368
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 368
“My lord and model of us all, Alkínoös,
as you require of me, in satisfaction,
this broadsword of clear bronze goes to our guest.
420
Its hilt is silver, and the ringed sheath
of new-sawn ivory—a costly weapon.”
He turned to give the broadsword to Odysseus,
facing him, saying blithely:
“Sir, my best
wishes, my respects; if I offended,
I hope the seawinds blow it out of mind.
God send you see your lady and your homeland
soon again, after the pain of exile.”
Odysseus, the great tactician, answered:
“My hand, friend; may the gods award you fortune.
430
I hope no pressing need comes on you ever
for this fine blade you give me in amends.”
He slung it, glinting silver, from his shoulder,
as the light shone from sundown. Messengers
were bearing gifts and treasure to the palace,
where the king’s sons received them all, and made
a glittering pile at their grave mother’s side;
then, as Alkínoös took his throne of power,
each went to his own high-backed chair in turn,
and said Alkínoös to Arêtê:
440
“Lady, bring here a chest, the finest one;
a clean cloak and tunic; stow these things;
and warm a cauldron for him. Let him bathe,
when he has seen the gifts of the Phaiákians,
and so dine happily to a running song.
My own wine-cup of gold intaglio20
I’ll give him, too; through all the days to come,
tipping his wine to Zeus or other gods
in his great hall, he shall remember me.”
Then said Arêtê to her maids:
“The tripod:
450
stand the great tripod legs about the fire.”
They swung the cauldron on the fire’s heart,
poured water in, and fed the blaze beneath
until the basin simmered, cupped in flame.
20
A design cut into the surface.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Eight
369
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 369
The queen set out a rich chest from her chamber
and folded in the gifts—clothing and gold
given Odysseus by the Phaiákians;
then she put in the royal cloak and tunic,
briskly saying to her guest:
“Now here, sir,
look to the lid yourself, and tie it down
460
against light fingers, if there be any,
on the black ship tonight while you are sleeping.”
Noble Odysseus, expert in adversity,
battened the lid down with a lightning knot
learned, once, long ago, from the Lady Kirkê.21
And soon a call came from the Bathing Mistress
who led him to a hip-bath, warm and clear—
a happy sight, and rare in his immersions
after he left Kalypso’s home—where, surely,
the luxuries of a god were ever his.
470
When the bath maids had washed him, rubbed him down,
put a fresh tunic and a cloak around him,
he left the bathing place to join the men
at wine in hall.
The princess Nausikaa,
exquisite figure, as of heaven’s shaping,
waited beside a pillar as he passed
and said swiftly, with wonder in her look:
“Fare well, stranger; in your land remember me
who met and saved you. It is worth your thought.”
The man of all occasions now met this:
480
“Daughter of great Alkínoös, Nausikaa,
may Zeus the lord of thunder, Hera’s consort,
grant me daybreak again in my own country!
But there and all my days until I die
may I invoke you as I would a goddess,
princess, to whom I owe my life.”
He left her
and went to take his place beside the king.
Now when the roasts were cut, the winebowls full,
a herald led the minstrel down the room
amid the deference of the crowd, and paused
490
to seat him near a pillar in the center—
whereupon that resourceful man, Odysseus,
21A sorceress; Odysseus’ encounter with her is described in Book X. Also spelled Circe.
370
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 370
carved out a quarter from his chine of pork,
crisp with fat, and called the blind man’s guide:
“Herald! here, take this to Demódokos:
let him feast and be merry, with my compliments.
All men owe honor to the poets—honor
and awe, for they are dearest to the Muse
who puts upon their lips the ways of life.”
Gentle Demódokos took the proffered gift
500
and inwardly rejoiced. When all were served,
every man’s hand went out upon the banquet,
repelling hunger and thirst, until at length
Odysseus spoke again to the blind minstrel:
“Demódokos, accept my utmost praise.
The Muse, daughter of Zeus in radiance,
or else Apollo22 gave you skill to shape
with such great style your songs of the Akhaians—
their hard lot, how they fought and suffered war.
You shared it, one would say, or heard it all.
510
Now shift your theme, and sing that wooden horse
Epeios built, inspired by Athena—
the ambuscade Odysseus filled with fighters
and sent to take the inner town of Troy.
Sing only this for me, sing me this well,
and I shall say at once before the world
the grace of heaven has given us a song.”
The minstrel stirred, murmuring to the god, and soon
clear words and notes came one by one, a vision
of the Akhaians in their graceful ships
520
drawing away from shore: the torches flung
and shelters flaring: Argive soldiers crouched
in the close dark around Odysseus: and
the horse, tall on the assembly ground of Troy.
For when the Trojans pulled it in, themselves,
up to the citadel, they sat nearby
with long-drawn-out and hapless argument—
favoring, in the end, one course of three:
either to stave the vault with brazen axes,
or haul it to a cliff and pitch it down,
530
or else to save it for the gods, a votive glory—
the plan that could not but prevail.
For Troy must perish, as ordained, that day
she harbored the great horse of timber; hidden
the flower of Akhaia lay, and bore
slaughter and death upon the men of Troy.
22God of music and prophecy. He would naturally have an affinity with bards.
H
OMER
/ The Odyssey, Book Eight
371
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 371
He sang, then, of the town sacked by Akhaians
pouring down from the horse’s hollow cave,
this way and that way raping the steep city,
and how Odysseus came like Arês to
540
the door of Deïphobos,
23
with Meneláos,
and braved the desperate fight there—
conquering once more by Athena’s power.
The splendid minstrel sang it.
And Odysseus
let the bright molten tears run down his cheeks,
weeping the way a wife mourns for her lord
on the lost field where he has gone down fighting
the day of wrath that came upon his children.
At sight of the man panting and dying there,
she slips down to enfold him, crying out;
550
then feels the spears, prodding her back and shoulders,
and goes bound into slavery and grief.
Piteous weeping wears away her cheeks:
but no more piteous than Odysseus’ tears,
cloaked as they were, now, from the company.
Only Alkínoös, at his elbow, knew—
hearing the low sob in the man’s breathing—
and when he knew, he spoke:
“Hear me, lords and captains of Phaiákia!
And let Demódokos touch his harp no more.
560
His theme has not been pleasing to all here.
During the feast, since our fine poet sang,
our guest has never left off weeping. Grief
seems fixed upon his heart. Break off the song!
Let everyone be easy, host and guest;
there’s more decorum in a smiling banquet!
We had prepared here, on our friend’s behalf,
safe conduct in a ship, and gifts to cheer him,
holding that any man with a grain of wit
will treat a decent suppliant like a brother.
570
Now by the same rule, friend, you must not be
secretive any longer! Come, in fairness,
tell me the name you bore in that far country;
how were you known to family, and neighbors?
No man is nameless—no man, good or bad,
but gets a name in his first infancy,
none being born, unless a mother bears him!
Tell me your native land, your coast and city—
sailing directions for the ships, you know—
for those Phaiákian ships of ours
580
that have no steersman, and no steering oar,
23
Meneláos’ wife, Helen, had in Troy been given in marriage to Deïphobos.
372
The Ancient World
05_273-611_Homer 2/Aesop  7/10/00  1:25 PM  Page 372
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested