c# open a pdf file : Delete page pdf file reader SDK control API wpf web page html sharepoint smith_modern_optical_engineering31-part132

The applicability of this particular zoom system is limited, since
the commercial demand for variable-power systems at unit magnifi-
cation is quite modest. However, by combining the moving element
with one or two additional elements (usually of opposite sign), the
zoom system can be made to operate at any desired set of conjugates.
Several such arrangements are shown in Fig. 9.30. Note that in each
system the moving lens passes through a point at which it works at
unit magnification. By adding either a positive or negative eyelens or
by simply adjusting the power of the last lens of the system, as indi-
cated in the lower sketch, a telescope or afocal attachment may be
made.
Asystem which is in focus only at two different magnifications is
called a bang-bang zoom. It can be quite useful if what is wanted is a
system  with  just  two  magnifications  (and  a  continuous  “zooming”
action is not necessary). Since a bang-bang system is much easier and
cheaper to design and build than a continuously in-focus zoom, it is
often well worth considering whether a true zoom is really needed in a
292
Chapter Nine
Figure 9.29
The basic unit power zoom lens. The graph indicates
the shift of the image as the lens is moved to change the magni-
fication.
Delete page pdf file reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages from pdf; delete pages pdf online
Delete page pdf file reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
copy page from pdf; cut pages out of pdf online
given application, or whether a simple choice of two magnifications,
focal lengths, or powers would be sufficient.
All variable-power systems with a single moving component have
the same characteristic relationship between image shift and magnifi-
cation (or focal length). Thus for an uncompensated “single-lens” zoom
system, there can be at most two magnifications at which the image is
in exact focus. At all other powers, the image will be defocused. This
situation can be alleviated in two ways. A “mechanically compensated”
zoom system is one in which the defocusing is eliminated by introduc-
ing a compensating shift of one of the other elements of the system, as
exemplified by Fig. 9.31. Since the motion of the compensating  ele-
ment is nonlinear, it is usually effected by a cam arrangement, hence
the name “mechanically compensated.”
In a zoom system, the motion of the elements will, of course, cause
the ray heights, angles, etc. to change. It is apparent that the chro-
matic  contributions  of  a  single  element  (which  are  proportional  to
y
2
/V and yy
p
/V for  axial  and  lateral chromatic,  respectively)  will
vary accordingly. Thus, in order to achieve a fully achromatic system
through the zoom, each component must be individually achromatized.
However, since a small amount of chromatic often can be tolerated,
singlet components are not uncommon.
The formulas for a thin-lens layout of this type of system are shown
in  Fig.  9.31  and  can  be  derived  by  manipulation  of  the first-order
expressions of Chap. 2. To use the formulas, one may arbitrarily select
a value for 
A
,the power of the first element, then determine 
B
,
C
,
and the spacings for the “minimum shift” setting. To find the spacings
for other positions of the moving lens, choose a value for one space and
solve for  the  position of the  compensating element to maintain  the
final focus at the same distance from the fixed element.
Basic Optical Devices
293
Figure 9.30
Zoom systems based
on the unit power principle.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET File: Merge PDF; VB.NET File: Split PDF; VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for
delete pages on pdf; delete blank page in pdf
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
your PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page adding a page into PDF document, deleting unnecessary page from PDF file and changing
delete a page from a pdf reader; delete pages in pdf online
It should be apparent that despite the use of three components in
the preceding discussion, only two components are necessary to make
a mechanically compensated zoom lens. Given any two components, if
we change the space between them, Eqs. 2.44 and 2.45 indicate that
the effective focal length will  be  changed. Of course, the back  focal
length will also change (according to Eq. 2.46), and the entire system
will have to be shifted to maintain the focus. It usually turns out to be
advantageous  if  one  component  is  positive  and  the  other  negative.
There are thus two possible arrangements, depending on which power
comes first, and one’s choice can be based on size and focal-length con-
siderations.  Many  of  the  newer  35-mm  camera  zoom  lenses  are  of 
this type.
Many of the newer zoom lens designs have more than two moving
components. The extra motion may be used to improve the image qual-
ity through the zoom or to stabilize the image quality when the lens is
focused at a near distance.
294
Chapter Nine
Figure 9.31
Mechanically compensated zoom system. 
Given: , power (1/efl) of a system at “minimum shift”
M, ratio of power at S
1
=0 to power at S
1
=(R - 1)/R
A
R=
M
Choose: 
A
,power of the first element. May be an arbitrary choice, or set
A
=(R - 1)/R(S
1
+S
2
) to control the length, (S
1
+S
2
), at “minimum shift”
Then: 
B
=-
A
(R + 1) = (1 - M)/R(S
1
+S
2
)
C
=(
A
+)R(R+ 1)/(3R - 1) to get  at the “minimum shift” position
“minimum shift” occurs at
S
1
=(R -1)/
A
(R+ 1) = RS
2
=R(S
1
+S
2
)/(1 + R)
S
2
=(R -1)/
A
R(R+ 1) =S
1
/R = (S
1
+S
2
)/(1 + R)
l′ = (3R - 1)/R(R+ 1)
S
1
+S
2
+l′ =
+
Motion of lens C is computed to hold the distance from lens A to the focal point at a con-
stant value as lens B is moved.
(3R -1)

R(R + 1)
(R -1)
A
R
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C#
delete pages from a pdf file; delete pdf pages android
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Besides, in the process of splitting PDF document, developers can also remove certain PDF page from target PDF file using C#.NET PDF page deletion API.
delete a page from a pdf online; delete a page from a pdf
The other technique for reducing the focus shift in a variable-power
system is called optical compensation. If two (or more) alternate lenses
are linked and moved together with respect to the lenses between them,
the powers and spaces can be so chosen that there are more than two
magnifications at which the image is in exact focus. Two systems of this
type are shown in Fig. 9.32. In the upper sketch, the first and third ele-
ments are linked and move to produce the varifocal effect. The second
element, the other elements, and the film plane are all held in a fixed
relationship with each other. The image motion produced by this type of
system is a cubic curve, as shown in the upper graph. It is thus possible
to arrange the powers and spaces so that the image is in exact focus for
three  positions  in  the  zoom.  The  defocusing  between  these points  is
greatly  reduced  in  comparison  with  the  simpler  systems  described
above, and if the range of powers is modest and the focal length of the
system is short, a nonlinear compensating motion of one of the elements
is not necessary. In the second system of Fig. 9.32, the motion of the
image is described by a still-higher-order curve, and four points of exact
compensation are possible; the residual image shift is about one-twenti-
eth of the shift of the upper system. It turns out that the maximum
number of points of exact compensation is equal to the number of vari-
able airspaces. (Note that in Fig. 9.30 this number is 2, and the image
motion is parabolic with two possible points of compensation.)
Originally it was thought that the fabrication of a mechanically com-
pensated zoom lens would be almost impossibly difficult, requiring an
unattainable level of precision, which could not be maintained as the
cams, etc., wore with use. This turned out to be an incorrect assump-
tion, and mechanically  compensated  zoom systems  are  widely  used 
for  almost all applications. Optical compensation is rare for several 
Basic Optical Devices
295
Figure 9.32
Optically compensated zoom systems. The upper system
has three “active” components and three points of compensation as
indicated in the upper graph. The lower system has four “active” com-
ponents and four compensation points.
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Delete unimportant contents Embedded page thumbnails.
delete page numbers in pdf; add remove pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Add and Insert a Page to PDF File Using VB. doc2.Save( outPutFilePath). Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File Using VB.
delete page from pdf file; delete pages of pdf online
reasons. The requirements of the power and space layout to achieve
optical  compensation  are  extremely  stringent  and  restrict  the  lens
designer’s  ability  to  maintain  the  correction  of  the  lens  system
throughout the zoom range. In addition, the size of the optically com-
pensated system is significantly larger than the equivalent mechani-
cally  compensated  system.  Despite  the  fact  that  the  optically
compensated lens with its simple and undemanding mechanics is less
expensive to fabricate, provided size is not a  problem, the  optically
compensated zoom is effectively obsolete.
In zoom systems the focal lengths of a stationary first element and
of the elements following the last moving lens may be changed at
will, provided  the  relationship between  the  focal  points  of the ele-
ments is maintained. Such changes modify the focal length (or pow-
er) of the overall system and, in the case of the following elements,
the amount of image shift as well. However, since a change in object
position will shift the focus point of the first element with respect to
the other elements, a zoom system is sensitive to object position. In
order  to  maintain  precise  compensation,  most  zoom  lenses  are
focused by moving an element of the first component with respect to
the rest to offset this effect. As with the anamorphic systems dis-
cussed in  Sec.  9.9,  the  leading component serves  to  collimate the
light from the object.
9.11 The Diffractive Surface
The diffractive surface (or “kinoform” or “binary surface”) as used in
imaging  optics  is  discussed  at  some  length  in  connection  with  the
design of telescope objectives in Chap. 12. In this section we are con-
cerned not with the kinoform’s Fresnel surface modulo 2π but with
those surfaces which  operate on the  basis  of  diffraction in order to
introduce a controlled diffusion or to produce a message or a pattern
from  a  simple  laser  beam.  Often  these  surfaces  are  simple  two-, 
four-,  or  eight-level  patterns  with  randomized  surface  elevations.
These devices are made feasible by the recent advances in fabrication
technology which make it possible to produce the microscopic wave-
length-sized surface details required to produce these effects.
To those who think in terms of the phasefront or wavefront, the form
of such a device is derived by describing the phasefront which will pro-
duce  the  desired  effect  and  then  determining  the  surface  contour
which will  impose this phasefront  on the  input  beam.  However, for
those who think geometrically, this is a less than satisfying explana-
tion of how  such a surface functions. The following are not elegant
depictions, but they do serve the purpose of taking some of the mys-
tery out of such devices.
296
Chapter Nine
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
The VB.NET PDF document splitter control provides VB.NET developers an easy to use solution that they can split target multi-page PDF document file to one-page
cut pages out of pdf file; delete pdf pages in reader
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Delete unimportant contents Embedded page thumbnails.
delete blank page from pdf; cut pages from pdf online
The diffusing surface can be visualized as a surface randomly cov-
ered with microscopic lenses of a scale on the order of several wave-
lengths,  either concave or convex,  whose ratio  of diameter to  focal
length  equals  the  diffusion  angle.  Such  diffusers  are  commercially
available in diffusions of 
1
2
°, 1°, etc. They can be useful in a number
of applications, such as where one desires to destroy the spatial coher-
ence in a laser system in order to eliminate interference patterns. The
surface lens concept is not necessary; the same result can be produced
by a stepped surface which locally alters the phase of the wavefront.
The pattern-generating surface is a little more difficult. Visualize a
surface covered with weak prisms, each of which directs its portion of
the incoming laser beam in a direction which will form a specific part
of the desired pattern. When such a surface is produced on a micro-
scopic wavelength scale, there are many, many tiny prisms in the area
covered by the beam, and when the beam is translated across the sur-
face, there are always enough prisms within the beam to produce the
pattern.  The  bigger  the  beam  diameter,  the  more  prisms  will  be
involved, and the better the definition of the pattern will be. There is
an inherent “speckle” produced in this process which shows up as a
random pattern of dots in the final image. Again, the effect can be pro-
duced by stepped surfaces which alter the wavefront diffractively to
produce the desired patterns.
Bibliography
Note: Titles preceded by an asterisk (*) are out of print.
Allard, F. (ed.), Fiber Optics Handbook, New York, McGraw-Hill, 1990.
Benford,  J.,  and  H.  Rosenberger,  “Microscopes”  in  Kingslake  (ed.),
Applied  Optics  and  Optical  Engineering, vol.  4,  New  York,
Academic, 1967.
Bergstein, L., and L. Motz, J. Opt. Soc. Am., vol. 52, April 1962, pp.
363–388 (zoom lenses).
Brown,  T.  G.,  “Optical  Fibers  and  Fiber-Optic  Communication,”  in
Handbook of Optics, vol. 2, New York, McGraw-Hill, 1995, Chap. 10.
Habell, K., and A. Cox, Engineering Optics, Pitman, 1948.
Inoue, S., and R.  Oldenboug, “Microscopes,” in Handbook of Optics,
vol. 2, New York, McGraw-Hill, 1995, Chap. 17.
*Jacobs,  D.,  Fundamentals  of  Optical  Engineering, New  York,
McGraw-Hill, 1943.
Johnson,  R. B., “Lenses,” in  Handbook of Optics, vol.  2,  New York,
McGraw-Hill, 1995, Chap. 1.
Keck,  D.,  and  R.  Love,  “Fiber  Optics  for  Communications”  in
Kingslake, R., and B. Thompson (eds.), Applied Optics and Optical
Engineering, vol. 6, New York, Academic, 1980.
Basic Optical Devices
297
Kingslake, R., Optics in Photography, SPIE Press, 1992.
Kingslake, R., Optical System Design, San Diego, Academic, 1983.
Kingslake, R., “The Development of the Zoom Lens,” J. Soc. Motion
Picture and Television Engrs., vol. 69, August 1960, pp. 534–544.
Legault, R., in Wolfe and Zissis, The Infrared Handbook, Washington,
Office of Naval Research, 1985 (reticles).
Melzer,  J.,  and  K.  Moffitt,  Head  Mounted  Displays, New  York,
McGraw-Hill, 1997.
Moore, D. T., “Gradient Index Optics,” in Handbook of Optics, vol. 2,
New York, McGraw-Hill, 1995, Chap. 9.
Patrick, F., “Military Optical Instruments” in Kingslake (ed.), Applied
Optics and Optical Engineering, vol. 5, New York, Academic, 1969.
Siegmund, W., “Fiber Optics” in Kingslake (ed.), Applied Optics and
Optical Engineering, vol. 4, New York, Academic, 1967.
Siegmund, W.,  in  W. Driscoll  (ed.),  Handbook  of  Optics, New York,
McGraw-Hill, 1978 (fiber optics).
Smith, W. J., Practical Optical  System Layout, New York, McGraw-
Hill, 1997.
Smith,  W.  J.,  “Techniques  of  First-Order  Layout,”  in  Handbook  of
Optics, vol. 1, New York, NcGraw-Hill, 1995, Chap. 32.
Smith,  W.,  in  W.  Driscoll  (ed.),  Handbook  of  Optics, New  York,
McGraw-Hill, 1978.
Smith,  W.,  in  Wolfe  and  Zissis  (eds.),  The  Infrared  Handbook,
Washington, Office of Naval Research, 1985.
*Strong, J., Concepts of Classical Optics, New York, Freeman, 1958.
Wetherell, W. B., “Afocal Systems,” in Handbook of Optics, vol. 2, New
York, McGraw-Hill, 1995, Chap. 2.
Wetherell, W. B., in Shannon and Wyant (eds.), Applied Optics and
Optical Engineering, vol. 10, San Diego, Academic, 1987 (afocal sys-
tems).
Wolfe,  W.,  in  Wolfe  and  Zissis  (eds.),  The  Infrared  Handbook,
Washington, Office of Naval Research, 1985 (scanners).
Exercises
1 (a) What focal lenghts are required for the eyelens and objective of a 20 ×
astronomical telescope which is 10 in long? (b) What is the eye relief? (c) What
is the minimum objective diameter if the diffraction limit of resolution is to
match the resolution of the eye? (d) What is the maximum real field of the tele-
scope if the diameter of the eye lens is 0.5 in?
ANSWER
: (a) 10 in/21; 200 in/21 (b) 1
2
in (c) 1.83 in (d) ±0.0296 radians
2 It is desired to add an afocal attachment in front of a 10-in f/10 camera lens
to convert it to a 5-in focal length. (a) What element powers are necessary for
298
Chapter Nine
a 3-in length reverse Galilean telescope to accomplish this? (b) What diameter
must the outer element have if vignetting is not to exceed 50 percent for an
object field of ±60°? Sketch the system. Is this a reasonable diameter?
ANSWER
: (a) f
0
=-3 in; f
e
=+6 in (b) 31
2
in
3 A microscope is required to work at a distance of 3 in from the object to the
objective. If the objective and eyepiece both have 2-in focal lengths, what is the
length of the microscope and what is its power?
ANSWER
: Length=8 in; power=10×
4 What is the magnification produced by a telescope made up of a 5-in focal
length objective and a 5-in focal length eyepiece (and thus nominally of unit
power) when it is set at minus 2 diopters (i.e., the image of an infinitely dis-
tant object is -20 in from the eyelens)?
ANSWER
: -1.25× (with eye at eyelens) or -0.8× (with eye at exit pupil)
5 What base length must a rangefinder have to measure a range of 2000 m
to an accuracy of ±0.5 percent if it incorporates a 20-power telescope?
ANSWER
: 1 m
6 Determine the focal length, diameter, and position (relative to the detector)
for a radiometer field lens. The objective is a 5-in diameter f/4 paraboloid and
the detector is 0.2-in square. The field to be covered is ±0.02 radians.
ANSWER
: f = 0.77 in; diameter = 0.8 in minimum; s
2
=0.8 in
7 The entrance opening of a tapered hollow light pipe is twice the exit open-
ing. What is the largest angle a ray through the center of the entrance open-
ing can make with the axis and still emerge from the small end of the pipe?
ANSWER
: 30° (for a long pipe) and <90° (for a short pipe)
8 A hemicylindrical rod (plano-convex) with a cylindrical radius of 2.5 mm,
which is 20 mm long, is located 50 mm from a 1-mm-square source of light. At
the “focus,” what is the size of the illuminated area? (Assume the rod index is 1.5)
ANSWER
: 0.111 mm × 22.222 mm
9 Determine the element powers and spacings for a zoom lens of 10-in vertex
length (s
1
+s
2
=10 in) with a zoom ratio of 4 which is to have a 10-in focal
length at the “minimum shift” position. Plot the compensating motion of ele-
ment C against the focal length of the lens as the element B is moved. Use Fig.
9.31.
ANSWER
: M=4; powers: +0.05, -0.15, +0.18; spacings: 6.67 in, 3.33 in back
focus: 8.33 in
M
=
1
4
; powers: -0.1, +0.15, 0; spacings: 3.33 in, 6.67 in; back focus:
6.67 in
Basic Optical Devices
299
301
Optical Computation
10.1 Introduction
The analysis of an optical system requires a great deal of numerical
computation, devoted, for the most part, to the determination of the
exact paths taken by light rays as they pass through the system. As
previously mentioned, a ray may be traced by the application of Snell’s
law at each surface. There have been a great variety of formulations
devised for raytracing. Early formulas were designed for use with log-
arithms, and then formulas which were optimized for use with mechan-
ical desk calculators were widely used (the trigonometric equations in
Chap. 2 are of this type). Today the most widely used tool for raytrac-
ing  is  the  electronic  computer,  and  the  equations  presented  in  this
chapter are designed for this usage, although they can of course be used
with a desk or electronic calculator. These equations do not require that
a special computation be carried out for long radii or plane surfaces.
They are further characterized by the fact that the quantities involved
in them are “bounded,” i.e., the maximum size of each term of an equa-
tion is readily predicted in terms of the size of the optical system.
The latter sections of the chapter will present detailed directions for
computing the numerical values of the aberrations discussed in Chap. 3
and also equations for determining the third-order aberration contri-
butions of surfaces and of thin lenses.
The precision required of an optical calculation is at least six places,
obviously depending on the scale of the optical system and the applica-
tion to which it is put. Trigonometric functions should be carried to at
least six places after the decimal; this corresponds to an error of about
one-fifth  second  of  arc  and  is  adequate  for  all  but  very  demanding
Chapter
10
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested