c# open a pdf file : Delete page from pdf online software application dll winforms html .net web forms Thesis_Papazova_final5-part1306

51 
among American academic presses
134
chosen by 89 per cent of presses; next to it is Ebrary 
favoured by 82 per cent of presses, followed by former netLibrary (EBSCO e-books) with 81 per 
cent and by Barnes & Noble used by 75 per cent of publishers. All in all, the range of distribution 
channels for American academic presses is wide, in total represented by 63 vendors, platforms 
and aggregators.
135
Among publishers who use only third parties for selling e-books are Oxford 
University Press, Macfarland, Yale University Press, Random House, Harvard University Press 
(via the HUP portal at De Gruyter Online). 
The most popular way of acquiring an e-book is still by outright purchase in the cases of 
both libraries and individuals. The popularity of this business model is likely to be connected to 
a preference for owning an e-book to merely accessing one. In order to avoid unnecessary 
length and complexity, the issue of the absence of symbolic capital in the case of e-books was 
excluded from this overview. Accessing e-books can be seen as temporary ownership, 
sometimes for as short as one or two days. For instance, Rodopi, a small Dutch academic 
publisher, offers two days access to its online products after purchase via ingentaconnect
136
which in fact violates the whole notion of ‘purchase’.  
Even after purchasing an e-book, the fact of possession is still very ambiguous. The 
common concern of readers is that the life span of an e-book is likely to be much shorter than 
that of a paper copy, which can be passed down from generation to generation. Although many 
publishers and third parties state that they guarantee perpetual access to their e-books (among 
them the University of Chicago Press
137
and Brill), and thus encourage individuals to build an e-
library of their own, it is still too early to say whether this claim will prove workable in the 
future. The life span of an e-book can also be tied to the life of a reading device (Bedford e-
Book to Go
138
) which makes it unreasonably short.  
134 Digital Book Publishing Strategies in the AAUP Community: Spring 2014, p. 4. 
135 Ibid., pp. 4-5. 
136Ingentaconnect is a website that hosts scholarly books and journals from different publishers (can be accessed 
via <http://www.ingentaconnect.com>.   
137 E-books from the University of Chicago Press, n.pag. 
<http://www.press.uchicago.edu/books/aboutEbooks.html> (Accessed 29 July 2014).   
138 Compare E-books, n.pag. 
<http://www.macmillanhighered.com/Catalog/elearningbrowsebymediatype/eBook&cparam1=ektron&contentid=
12741> (Accessed 29 July 2014).  
Delete page from pdf online - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages from pdf in reader; delete page from pdf document
Delete page from pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages pdf; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
52 
Furthermore, purchasing an e-book is different from buying a paper version, for in the 
former case the reader buys a licence but not a ‘book’. This is actually a reason why e-books 
cannot be resold or inherited
139
like paper books (the license is non-transferable). However, in 
2013, Amazon received a patent for re-selling used e-books.
140
This new practice has not been 
implemented yet, but if it is, it will be extremely interesting to see how it changes the digital 
world. Another serious issue is that in most cases one cannot obtain a refund for e-books or 
return them (among publishers and distributors who refuse this are Bol.com
141
, Brill
142
Wiley
143
), or this occurs only at the discretion of company management (for instance, 
eBooks.com
144
). Amazon allows refunds and returns of e-books within seven days of purchase
145
but can remove this option from one’s account if too many e-books are returned. 
Slowly but surely the subscription model is gaining acceptance among libraries and 
individuals. Cambridge University Press is among those publishers who do not sell their e-books 
and journals directly from their website but offer a subscription model for different collections. 
Cambridge University Press Books Online are only available for institutional purchase.
146
Thus, 
individual scholars are virtually excluded from access to Cambridge University Press collections. 
However, a subscription model is unlikely to become more popular than outright purchase of 
scholarly monographs and books for personal use due to the type of the content involved. The 
139  See also: Z. Knight, ‘What Happens to All that Digital Goodness You Have Purchased after You Die?’, 
Techdirt,  August 30, 2012 <https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20120828/16191120192/what-happens-to-all-that-
digital-goodness-you-have-purchased-after-you-die.shtml> (Accessed 29 July 2014).    
140 Amazon Poised to Sell Used E-books, Publishers Weekly, February 07, 2013, n.pag. 
<http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/industry-news/bookselling/article/55849-amazon-poised-to-sell-
used-e-books.html> (Accessed 29 July 2014).   
141 Kan Ik E-books Annuleren of Retourneren?, n.pag.  
<https://www.bol.com/nl/m/klantenservice/digitaal-lezen-klantenservice/subject/62650065/index.html
(Accessed 15 May 2014). 
142 Brill’s Help and FAQ: Purchasing Books, Book Chapters, and Journal Articles, n.pag. 
http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/help#purchase> (Accessed 29 July 2014).  
143 Wiley: Return Policy for E-books, n.pag. <http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-302039.html#2> (Accessed 
29 July 2014).    
144 eBooks.com FAQs: What is your Refund Policy?, n.pag. <http://www.ebooks.com/help/faqs/#faq11> (Accessed 
29 July 2014). 
145 Kindle Return Policies, n.pag. <http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html/?nodeId=200144510
(Accessed 29 July 2014). 
146 How do I Purchase Access to Cambridge Books Online?, n.pag. 
<http://ebooks.cambridge.org/faq.jsf?pageTitle=FAQ> (Accessed 29 July 2014). 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Provides you with examples for adding an (empty) page to a PDF and adding empty pages You may feel free to define some continuous PDF pages and delete.
delete pdf pages acrobat; delete blank page from pdf
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
delete pages from pdf in preview; copy page from pdf
53 
shorter the life span of a digital product, the higher the chances that it can be acquired on a 
subscription basis. Thus, trade books (such as romances or thrillers) which are usually read only 
once and can be substituted by any new title in such a series easily to sell on this model or in 
bundles. Academic journals are as likely to be sold by outright purchase of individual titles as by 
subscription. In the case of scholarly books and monographs with a longer ‘shelf-life’ in the 
personal library, scholars may be reluctant to accept temporary access and prefer to buy a 
paper copy or at least an e-book in PDF which is easier to save to one’s hard drive. To conclude, 
pricing for the outright purchase of e-books is higher than pricing for subscriptions, which 
makes the latter more attractive to libraries. For individuals who cannot afford to buy e-books in 
quantity, outright purchase is more appealing unless the subscription price is extremely low – a 
situation that is pretty unlikely in academic publishing.   
In order to stimulate sales of e-books, publishers are looking for new methods to 
promote them among potential readers who may still be suspicious of e-book purchasing. The 
‘build your own e-library’ concept has been mentioned already. Perhaps to create a positive 
image of e-book lending, the University of Chicago Press offers 30 days access to its e-book  
collection – but calls it ‘30-day ownership for $7.00.’
147
Whatever the case, in all probability the 
concept of ownership is better developed and still remains strong in the academic environment.  
Short-term lending is not a model favoured by academic publishers because of the 
meagre revenue they can earn from libraries by providing e-lending of their collections. On the 
other hand, the reluctance of publishers and authors to cooperate with libraries and platform 
providers in lending e-books tips the balance in favour of Amazon
148
which, among its many 
other innovative projects, offers a Kindle Owners' Lending programme and self-publishing. 
However, this offer is less relevant for academic publishing because there is little likelihood that 
the 500,000 books that Amazon offers to borrowers for free and without due dates
149
will 
contain any significant number of academic titles. In fact, this e-lending programme is a 
147 E-books from the University of Chicago Press, n.pag. <http://press.uchicago.edu/books/aboutEbooks.html>  
(Accessed 29 July 2014).   
148 D.L. Mantzourani, E-book Lending: A Disruption in Process (Unpublished MA Thesis), (Universiteit Leiden, 2013), 
p. 12. 
149 Amazon.com: Kindle Owners' Lending Library, n.pag. 
<http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html?docId=1000739811> (Accessed 29 July 2014). 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+. PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C#
delete page on pdf; pdf delete page
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
delete page numbers in pdf; delete page from pdf file
54 
camouflaged subscription model because there is no need for readers to return borrowed e-
books, and a $99 annual fee is charged for the service. 
The power of online retailers like Amazon or bol.com (at a national level) lies not only in 
the extremely wide range of books they offer, which can compete with any bricks-and-mortar 
bookstore or the website of any single publisher. Amazon actually offers an additional service – 
it can be used as a database of all the books (printed or electronic) that exist in the world. If one 
knows the title of a book or only the author, one can easily find general first-hand information 
about the book by looking it up in the web shops of this giant. As a result, the chances of an 
order for a book being made with Amazon remain high. 
Demand-driven acquisition (Brill, De Gruyter) is a model designed entirely for libraries, 
while a variation of the pay-per-view model, the pay-per-use model, was introduced by Ebrary, 
intended for students.
150
Traces of the pay-per-view model can be found in a growing number of 
different paper and electronic book previews offered online to individuals. Among these are:  
Amazon Search Inside the Book, which is used by 88 per cent of presses; Google Books for 
Publishers (84%); Barnes & Noble See Inside (56%) and Bowker Indexing Service (33%).
151
Open Access – seen as the future for academic publishing – is especially successful in an 
e-journal environment, but OA as a model for academic e-books and monographs is still a new 
area for publishers: 53 per cent of American academic presses have no OA projects at all and 
only 27 per cent offer specific series or select titles in OA.
152
OA academic books may be offered 
by publishers via their own web sites as a part of their own OA programmes (Brill Open,
153
De 
Gruyter Open
154
) or may be made available via various OA directories such as the Directory of 
Open Access Books (DOAB), the OAPEN Library (Open Access publishing in European Networks) 
or specialised OA publishers (Open Book Publishers).  
At the moment, the OA initiative is predominantly adopted in academic publishing with 
the aim of freely disseminating knowledge, and the question is whether OA is possible within 
trade publishing because in this case the notion of ‘knowledge dissemination’ will have to be 
150 J.B. Thompson, Books in the Digital Age, second edition (Polity Press, 2011), pp. 342-343. 
151 Digital Book Publishing Strategies in the AAUP Community: Spring 2014, p. 7. 
152 Ibid., p. 8. 
153 Brill Open: Open Access Publishing, <http://www.brill.com//brill-open-0> (Accessed 29 July 2014). 
154 De Gruyter Open, <http://www.degruyter.com/page/829> (Accessed 29 July 2014).    
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET source code. Support .NET WinForms, ASP
cut pages from pdf file; delete page from pdf reader
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
cut pages out of pdf online; delete pdf pages android
55 
expanded as these publications do not represent the results of research. For instance, the 
search for free Kindle books on Amazon gave more than 48000 free e-books with more than 
15000 nonfiction titles among them. Another American publisher of science fiction and fantasy, 
Baen Books (who earlier tried to use the OA model for its e-books), offers free e-books under 
the Baen Free Library.
155
These genres can hardly be associated with knowledge dissemination 
and reasons for dissemination for free may differ from objectives pursued by OA academic 
products.  
With the advent of digital technologies, new business models have appeared with the 
aim of exploring new ways to target the academic audience. Libraries are offered Patron Driven 
Acquisition and pay-per-view options; at the same time publishers looking for new market 
opportunities are showing more interest in the business-to-customer approach, which will be 
discussed in the next section. 
A shift towards a business-to-customer model 
According to the Association of American University Presses, in 2013, the average percentage of 
e-book revenue from direct sales from publishers’ websites was 4 per cent, with retailers being 
still the second most important source of revenue (41%) after aggregators, who contribute 49 
per cent.
156 
The percentage of revenue from direct sales may seem to be unimportant or small 
compared to that from aggregators or retailers, however, depending on company size it can 
easily fall within the top ten or twenty sources of revenue and cover the costs of web site 
maintenance and development with something to spare. 
The old and proven business-to-business model where the main ‘end-user’ was a library 
is still viable but fails to bring as much revenue as it used to. Thus, publishers are looking for 
new ways to keep their businesses growing. Before, they were mostly oriented towards 
libraries, but with the development of an e-book market and appropriate technologies, a shift to 
a business-to-customer approach is going to take place. No one would deny that, for academic 
publishers, libraries will always be one of their most important customers, but it is becoming 
155
The Baen Free Library, <http://www.baenebooks.com/c-1-free-library.aspx> (Accessed 29 July 2014).
156 Digital Book Publishing Strategies in the AAUP Community: Spring 2014, p. 4.  
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Ability to insert a text note after selected text. Allow users to draw freehand shapes on PDF page. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online.
delete pages pdf online; delete pages of pdf
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
Ability to insert a text note after selected text. Allow users to draw freehand shapes on PDF page. C# HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online.
delete pages in pdf reader; delete pages in pdf online
56 
apparent today that publishers are being forced to adapt to what individuals want. Online 
shopping made academic books better available to individual scholars than used to be the case 
(24/7 availability, fast or immediate delivery, easy discoverability, etc.). POD was initially aimed 
at lowering stock levels and the money tied up in it as well as to lower write-off costs of unsold 
stock, and it worked well for academic presses because of low sales levels and long sales lives, 
but eventually POD turned out to become a way of making any book available, more to satisfy 
the needs of individuals than those of institutions (after all the libraries have already been 
provided with the copies they wanted). For publishers to have a website of their own and sell 
paper and electronic books from it is another step towards the business-to-customer paradigm. 
Print and e-book bundling are as profitable in sales to individuals (aforementioned Brill’s 
Mybook project, for instance) as to organisations. 
Before adding a new format for e-books to existing ones (the second, the third and so 
on) publishers will need to consider market demand. If a new format produces additional sales 
without cannibalising revenue from other formats, it is feasible to offer it. In reality, academic 
publishers cannot be sure that ePub will stimulate sales or that its users will be new customers 
who are not already buying e-books in PDF. Publishers are increasingly asked to meet the 
expectations of the individual scholar who wants to read e-books on a variety of devices: a PDF 
version for laptops and tablets, ePub for mobile phones and probably one of the formats used 
for reading on a dedicated e-reader. Furthermore, the button provided Amazon’s and Barnes & 
Noble’s web shops to request an electronic version of a paper book for their own dedicated e-
readers can serve as an indicator to publishers of what their customers want. Making e-books in 
different formats is actually a trade-off between publishers and individuals, because libraries 
are not very interested in keeping and archiving several formats of the same book, at least 
because of the additional costs involved. 
The shift to a business-to-customer approach is not going to happen overnight for a 
number of reasons. Although academic publishing can hardly be called a mass production 
business, it is in the sense that distribution and marketing are aimed at selling, not at the title 
level but in big deals, bundles, etc. Actually, it is rare enough for a single title to be marketed to 
a large audience – publishers deal mostly in collections. Thus, the chances of selling more copies 
57 
of a single book are being reduced because individual scholars are simply overlooked. It is an 
established tradition for scholars to take the initiative and actively seek out books but in a time 
of financial stress, publishers will have to compete to grab individuals’ attention. This is a 
situation where social media has proved to work well. At the moment, Facebook and Twitter 
offer an easy and cheap but effective way of providing information about new releases not only 
to a scholarly audience but to a large general audience. Nobody expects academic books to 
become bestsellers, thus almost no effort is spent on targeting individuals: in the current 
situation, this may be an example of an old and obsolete way of thinking and running a 
business. 
A look to the future 
The present day is a challenging, yet interesting period in the development of academic 
publishing. Roads of scholarly communication and research are undergoing profound changes, 
especially in the sciences:   
Partly as a consequence of this ability to generate data on such an unprecedented scale, 
scientists are now publishing more widely and at a greater frequency than ever before: 
today, life scientists alone are generating more than two peer-reviewed papers every 
minute.
157
It is quite likely that instead of lamenting the diminishing importance of academic 
publishers in making public the results of research (because of so-called self-publishing), the 
very near future will see publishers bearing a growing responsibility for publishing monographs 
and academic books. They will perform the role of intermediaries between different scholars in 
helping them to produce not an article but a full-length book. This role may become crucial in 
the light of recent changes in the ways academic work is evaluated at universities. For instance, 
in the UK, scholars are under pressure from new systems of evaluation; the Research Excellence 
157 Pettifer, S. et al, ‘Ceci n’est pas un Hamburger: Modelling and Representing the Scholarly Article’, Learned 
Publishing, Vol. 24(3) (2011), p. 208. 
58 
Framework (REF) is to be implemented in 2014. Crudely put, all research results are to be 
presented in publications, and publishing articles is faster and earns more points than writing a 
lengthy book that can be finished only after several years of work. If a publication is unlikely to 
become REF-able (i.e. bring enough points), it will not be approved by the managing body of the 
university. This REF-ability in fact represents an undermining of scholarship and a sapping of the 
spirit of science, as it will result in a decreasing number of academic books and monographs. 
Analogously, this practice poses a threat to academic publishing. The tendency to publish more 
titles with the falling numbers of copies sold shows no signs of ceasing. In this regard, the role of 
publishers is dual: they stimulate the development of scholarship and help to disseminate 
knowledge but at the present moment the increasing number of publications partially caused by 
their attempts to increase profits cannot but result in a deterioration in the quality of published 
works. It may be of a particular relevance to trace the percentage of academic books that fail to 
meet academic requirements to the works of this kind. Similarly, the quality of many OA 
journals that are springing up in large numbers is in doubt, as is the whole procedure of peer 
review
158
(regardless of its advantages and contradictions), because it cannot be mediated in a 
proper way due to the overwhelming number of publications. Another relevant study can be 
conducted in order to trace back the route of articles that were rejected by the high-ranking 
journals and ended up published somewhere else. 
Common practice today is to publish more new titles to compensate for the decreasing 
sales. One concern that can arise in this situation is how the scholarly world is supposed to 
digest this growing number of publications with shrinking funds available. When there are so 
many publications available, the visibility of scholars who are at the beginning of their careers 
will definitely decrease and one’s inability to read or keep track of all the publications in a 
particular field may become a real problem (for libraries too). Logic suggests that at some point 
the number of publications will reach a maximum where it is no longer possible either to publish 
more titles or to find academic material to publish. Publishers are already experiencing 
problems in finding authors, especially for journal articles; if there are so many new journals in 
existence, where can authors be found? This means that the pace of a growth of academic 
158 J. Bohannon, ‘Who’s Afraid of Peer Review?’, Science, 4 October 2013: Vol. 342, no. 6154, pp. 60-
65, <https://www.sciencemag.org/content/342/6154/60.full.pdf> (Accessed 15 June 2014). 
59 
publishing should be co-extensive with the growth of the academic community wishing to 
publish the results of the research.  University presses seem to be in a more favourable situation 
because they are not under the same pressure to produce more and more titles in order to 
maintain constant growth as publishers are who are listed on the stock exchange and who are 
thus forced to show growth every year. All in all, the downfall of academic publishing is not very 
close and it will be intriguing to see how digital technologies will change it and perhaps prevent 
its collapse. 
Conclusions 
Academic publishing covers a wide range of content which needs to be delivered to the end-
user in an appropriate way. It is out of the question that it could be delivered in only one 
format. The more bitty the content, the more amenable it is to online dissemination and 
consumption. Long narrative content requires other forms of consumption while dissemination 
can be achieved with the same simplicity as bitty content (e-books are downloaded easily from 
the web but are consumed on dedicated e-readers or laptops). The next step is to determine 
which device should be used as the medium for consumption and which mode of reading will be 
applied. By answering these questions, the best format can be chosen. All in all, the type of 
content will be the most important factor in determining the choice of a format.  
As this paper has focused on academic e-books, two formats that are seen as the most 
common formats for e-books were examined. The choice of a format for a publisher is not a 
straightforward matter when several formats compete with one another. The attempts of ePub 
to become a recognised format for academic e-books have proved less successful than its 
developers would have liked. No one will deny that much work is being done to promote it but 
it is without effect and it still too early to proclaim the dominance of ePub in academic 
publishing. This paper has attempted to demonstrate this by examining various software 
reading systems and the functionalities of different file formats. PDF is, however, acknowledged 
as the leading format for academic e-books by the academic community itself.
159
Yet neither 
159 It is mentioned in too many articles to list them all here. Amon them: M. Aaltonen et al, ‘Usability and 
Compatibility of E-book Readers in an Academic Environment: A Collaborative Study’, IFLA Journal, Vol. 37(1) 
60 
ePub nor PDF, with their pitfalls, limitations and benefits, can be considered to be the only 
possible format for academic e-books. The requirements of different modes of use (a context in 
which a particular type of content is used determined by a device and a reading mode applied) 
will differ too much to exclude other formats from the academic e-book market, but some 
modes of use become prevalent for a particular type of content and therefore guarantee the 
dominance of some formats. For instance, reading and working with academic e-books, which 
involves in-depth reading, is mostly done on laptops or PCs, and thus this mode of use grants 
PDF its current market leadership. In addition, the ability of formats to imitate some features of 
other formats (reflowable PDF and fixed-layout ePub) complicates matters. 
Academic publishing today is in a state of a constant flux caused by changes in 
technology. If a publishing house cannot keep up with these changes, it is very likely to be 
overtaken by another publisher. Among new trends is the issue of accessibility where there 
seem to be greater technical advances than have been implemented in practice. New 
technologies have also been stimulating the appearance of new pricing and business models as 
well as changes in production processes (XML-workflow, for instance). One of the main issues in 
academic publishing today is whether adding new formats to existent ones will help publishers 
reach new end-users and cover the costs of production of these formats. Adding new digital 
formats may be dealt with by publishers in the same way as they approached the first e-books 
which were thought to cannibalise revenue from print editions. However, all this shuffling of 
formats is no more than the publishers’ attempts to meet the expectations of their end-users, 
and this paper has tried to trace this shift from a library-oriented paradigm to a reader-oriented 
perspective. 
The loss of physicality by e-books and inability to be translated into cultural capital in a 
habitual way, as well as to represent someone’s social identity, are virtually treated as a serious 
drawback for the uptake of this electronic medium. But e-books have been portending a 
significant change in the book industry, and it should not be forgotten that in the course of its 
advancement this new medium may develop a new culture of social identities: reading e-books 
may be opposed to reading paper books as being old-fashioned, unprogressive and 
(2011), p. 21. or Pettifer, S. et al, ‘Ceci n’est pas un Hamburger: Modelling and Representing the Scholarly Article’, 
Learned Publishing, Vol. 24(3) (2011), p. 213. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested