c# open a pdf file : Add and delete pages in pdf SDK control API .net web page windows sharepoint smith_modern_optical_engineering32-part133

applications. For moderate-sized systems, linear dimensions are car-
ried to five- or six-figure accuracy. Very large diffraction-limited sys-
tems will, of course, require greater  precision  throughout.  For most
calculations, the modern computer (or PC) in single-precision mode is
adequate. Double precision is usually used for diffraction and optical
path-length calculations.
The time required for an optical computation will obviously depend
on the technique and equipment utilized. Tracing a meridional ray (or
computing the third-order aberration) through a single surface on a
desk calculator is a matter of a minute or so for an experienced opera-
tor with a well-thought-out scheme of computation. A skew raytrace is
about an order of magnitude more time consuming. The time required
on an electronic computer is a matter of fractions of a second on older
machines and microseconds on the more powerful machines.
The task presented by raytracing is this: given an optical system
defined by its radii, thicknesses, and indices, and a ray defined by its
direction and its spatial location, to find the direction and spatial loca-
tion of the ray after it passes through the system.
Each set  of raytracing equations will be presented in four opera-
tional sections. First, the “opening” equations, which start the ray into
the system; second, the “refraction” equations, which determine the
ray  direction  after  passing  through  a  surface;  third,  the  “transfer”
equations,  which  carry  the  computation  to  the  next  surface;  and
fourth, the “closing” equations, which permit the determination of the
final intercept length or height. The refraction and transfer equations
are used iteratively, i.e., they are repeated for each surface of the sys-
tem. The opening and closing equations are used only at the start and
finish of the computation. The reader may note that the coordinate
system has been changed from that used in the first and second edi-
tions of this book, wherein the optical axis was the x axis. The optical
axis in this edition is the z axis.
10.2 Paraxial Rays
Although the paraxial raytracing equations were presented in Chap.
2, they are repeated here (in slightly modified form) for completeness.
Opening: 1. Given y and u at the first surface
or 2.
y= -lu
(10.1a)
or 3.
y= h-su
(10.1b)
Refraction:
u′ =
+
(10.1c)
-cy(n′-n)

n′
nu
n′
302
Chapter Ten
Add and delete pages in pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page numbers in pdf; cut pages from pdf reader
Add and delete pages in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete a page from a pdf acrobat; delete pdf pages acrobat
Transfer to the next surface:
y
j+1
=y
j
+tu′
j
(10.1d)
u
j+1
=u′
j
(10.1e)
Closing:
l′
k
=
(10.1f)
or
h′ = y
k
+s′
k
u′
k
(10.1g)
The symbols have the following meanings:
y
the height at which the ray strikes the surface; positive above the
axis, negative below.
u
the slope of the ray before refraction.
u′
the slope of the ray after refraction; ray slopes are positive if the
ray must be moved clockwise to reach the axis.
h
the height in the object plane at which the ray originates; sign
convention same as y.
h′
the height at which the ray intersects the image plane.
l
the distance from the first surface of the system to the axial inter-
cept of the ray; negative if intercept point is to the left of the sur-
face.
l′
the distance from the last surface to the final axial intercept of the
ray; positive if the intercept is to the right of the last surface.
s
the distance from the first surface to the object plane; negative if
the object plane is to the left of the surface.
s′
the distance from the last surface to the image plane; positive if
the image plane is to the right of the surface.
c
the curvature (reciprocal radius) of the surface, equal to 1/R; pos-
itive if the center of curvature is to the right of the surface.
n
the index of refraction preceding the surface.
n′
the index of refraction following the surface.
t
the vertex spacing between surfaces j and j+1, positive if surface
j+1 is to the right of surface j.
nand n′
are positive when the ray travels from left to right, negative when
the ray travels from right to left (as it does following a single
reflection).
k
subscript indicating the last surface of the system.
The physical meanings of the symbols are indicated in Fig. 10.1.
-y
k
u′
k
Optical Computation
303
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image
delete pages from a pdf online; delete pages pdf document
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
processing control SDK, you can create & add new PDF rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete page from pdf acrobat; cut pages from pdf
10.3 Meridional Rays
Meridional rays are those rays which are coplanar with the optical
axis of the system. The plane in which both ray and axis lie is called
the  meridional  plane,  and,  in  an  axially  symmetrical  system,  a
meridional ray remains in this plane as it passes through the sys-
tem.  The two-dimensional nature  of  the  meridional ray  makes it
relatively  easy  to  trace. Although a  great  amount  of  information
about an optical system can be obtained by tracing a few meridion-
al rays plus a Coddington trace or two (Sec. 10.6), given the speed
of the modern computer,  meridional rays are usually traced  as  a
special case of a skew or general raytrace. However, if rays are to
be traced with an electronic pocket calculator, then meridional rays
are  the obvious choice. The formulas in this section are designed 
to take advantage of the trigonometric capabilities of this type of
calculator.
Opening: 1. Given Q and sin U at the first surface.
304
Chapter Ten
Figure 10.1
Diagrams to illustrate the symbols used in the paraxial ray-
tracing equations (10.1a through 10.1g).
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
cut pages out of pdf file; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file. These two demos will help you to delete password for an encrypted PDF file.
delete pages from a pdf document; add and delete pages from pdf
Optical Computation
305
or 2. 
Q= -L sin U
(10.2a)
or 3. 
Q= H cos U - s sin U
(10.2b)
Refraction:
sin I = Qc + sin U
(10.2c)
sin I′ =
(10.2d)
U′ = U-I + I′
(10.2e)
Q′ =
(10.2f)
Transfer:
Q
j+ 1
=Q′
j
+t sin U′
j
(10.2g)
U
j+ 1
=U′
j
(10.2h)
Closing:
L′
k
=
(10.2i)
or
H′ =
(10.2j)
Miscellaneous:
y=
=
(10.2k)
z=
=
(10.2l)
D
1to2
=
(10.2m)
The symbols used are, for the most part, the same as those defined
in  Sec.  10.2,  capitalized  to  differentiate  them  from  the  lowercase
paraxial symbols. Symbols new to this section are
Q
the distance from the vertex of the surface to the incident ray, per-
pendicular to the ray; positive if upward.
Q′
the distance from the surface vertex to the refracted ray, perpendicu-
lar to the ray.
I
the angle of incidence at the surface; positive if the ray must be rotat-
ed clockwise to reach the surface normal (i.e., the radius).
t- z
1
+z
2

cos U′
1
1-cos (I-U)

c
Qsin (I-U)

(cos U + cos I)
sin (I-U)

c
Q′[1 + cos (I-U)]

(cos U′ + cos I′)
Q[1 + cos (I-U) ]

(cos U + cos I)
Q′
k
+s′
k
sin U′
k

cos U′
k
-Q′
k
sin U′
k
Q(cos U′ + cos I′)

(cos U + cos I)
nsin I
n′
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete pages from pdf online; delete pdf pages online
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Sticky Note to PDF Page in C#.NET. Able to add notes to PDF using C# source code in Visual Studio .NET framework.
delete blank page in pdf; delete pages pdf preview
I′
the angle of refraction.
z
the longitudinal coordinate (abscissa) of the intersection of the ray
with the surface; positive if the intersection is to the right of the ver-
tex.
D
1 to 2
the distance along the ray between surface 1 and surface 2.
The physical meanings of the symbols are indicated in Fig. 10.2.
Example A
As a numerical example, we will trace a paraxial and a meridional ray
through the marginal zone of an equiconvex lens with radii of 50 mm,
a thickness of 15 mm, and an index of 1.50. We will trace rays origi-
nating at an axial point 200 mm to the left of the first surface and
determine the axial intersections for both rays after passing through
the lens.  We will  also  determine the  height  at which the  marginal
(meridional) ray intersects the paraxial focal plane. Assuming the lens
to have an aperture of 40 mm, we will use a value of +0.1 for both the
paraxial u and the meridional sin U, so that the ray passes through
the lens about 20 mm from the axis.
The following tabulation indicates both the calculation and a conve-
nient way of arranging the raytrace data.
Graphical raytracing (see Fig. 10.3).
Meridional rays can be traced using
only a scale, straightedge, and compass. The ray is drawn to the sur-
face, and the normal to the surface is erected at the ray-surface inter-
section.  Two  circles are  drawn  about  the point of intersection with
their radii proportional to n and n′, the refractive indices before and
after the surface, respectively. From the intersection of the ray with
circle n at point A, a line is drawn parallel with the normal until it
intersects circle n′ at point B. The refracted ray is then drawn through
306
Chapter Ten
Figure 10.2
Diagram illustrating the symbols used in the meridional raytracing equations.
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
with this sample VB.NET code to add an image to textMgr.SelectChar(page, cursor) ' Delete a selected As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" doc.Save
delete pdf pages in reader; add and remove pages from pdf file online
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file. These C# demos will help you to delete password for an encrypted PDF file.
cut pages from pdf file; best pdf editor delete pages
Optical Computation
307
Example A—Raytrace Data
R
+50.0
-50.0
c=1/R
+0.020
-0.020
t
15.0
n
1.00
1.50
1.00
Paraxial Calculation
given:u
1
= +0.1
l
1
= -200.0
y
1
= +20.0 (by 10.1a)
yby 10.1d
+20.0
+19.0
uby 10.1c
+0.1
-0.066667
-0.29
l′ by 10.1f
+65.517241
Meridional Calculation
given: sin U
1
= +0.1
L
1
= -200.0
Q
1
= +20.0 (by 
10.2a)
Q
by 10.2g
+20.0
+19.589064
sin l
by 10.2c
+0.5
-0.475278
sin I′
by 10.2d
+0.333333
-0.712918
sin U′
+0.1
-0.083497
-0.372744
cosU′
0.9949874
+0.996508
-0.927934
Q′
by 10.2f
+20.841522
17.008692
L′
by 10.2i
H′ (s′=l′)
by 10.2j
+45.631041
-7.988131
Figure 10.3
Graphical raytrace.
point B and the ray-surface intersection. (For reflection, n′ = -n, and
a single circle is drawn. Point B is located at the intersection of the
parallel and the index circle on the opposite side of the surface.
If desired, the index circle construction can be carried out off to one
side of the drawing (to avoid cluttering the diagram) and the angles
transferred to the drawing. An alternative is to measure the angle of
incidence and compute the angle of refraction using Snell’s law (n sin
I = n′ sin I′). The accuracy of graphical raytracing is poor and  the
process is laborious. Thus, it is rarely used except for crude condenser-
type design. It is usually preferable to use a computer and draw the
rays from the computed data, or, better yet, to have the computer draw
the whole thing.
10.4 General, or Skew, Rays: 
Spherical Surfaces
Askew ray is a perfectly general ray; however, the application of the
term “skew” is  usually  restricted  to  rays which are  not  meridional
rays. A skew ray must  be defined in  three  coordinates  x,  y, and z,
instead of just z and y as  in the case of meridional rays. Until  the
advent  of  the  electronic  computer,  skew  rays  were  rarely  traced
because of the lengthy computation involved. Since a skew ray takes
only a bit longer to trace on an electronic computer than a meridional
ray, the reverse situation is now common, and meridional rays are usu-
ally traced as special  cases of general rays. The  general raytracing
equations given below are slightly modified from those presented by D.
Feder in the Journal of the Optical Society of America, vol. 41, 1951,
pp. 630–636.
The ray is defined by the coordinates x, y, and z of its intersection
point with a surface, and by its direction cosines, X, Y, and Z. The ori-
gin of the coordinate system is at the vertex of each surface. Figure
10.4 shows the meanings of these terms. Note that if x and X are both
zero, the ray is a meridional ray and direction cosine Y equals sin U.
The direction cosines are the projections, on the coordinate axes, of a
unit-length vector along the ray. The direction cosines may be visual-
ized as  the length, height,  and  width of  a  rectangular  solid  or box
which has a diagonal equal to one (1.0). (Note that the optical direction
cosine is simply the direction cosine as defined above, multiplied by
the index of refraction.)
The computation is opened by determining the values for x, y, z, X,
Y, and Z with respect to an arbitrarily chosen reference surface, which
may be plane (the usual choice) or spherical. Convenient choices for
the location of the reference surface are at the object (which allows the
easy use of a curved object surface, if appropriate), at the vertex of the
308
Chapter Ten
first surface, or at the entrance pupil. Note that Eq. 10.3a is simply the
equation of a sphere (and thus assures that the ray origin point lies in
the reference surface), and that Eq. 10.3b assures that the square of
the unit vector along the ray is equal to 1.0.
Opening (at the reference surface):
c(x
2
+y
2
+z
2
)-2z = 0
(10.3a)
X
2
+Y
2
+Z
2
=1.0
(10.3b)
Transfer to the first (or next) surface:
e= tZ- (xX + yY + zZ)
(10.3c)
M
1z
=z + eZ - t
(10.3d)
M
1
2
=x
2
+y
2
+z
2
- e
2
+t
2
- 2tz
(10.3e)
E
1
=
Z
2
-c
1
(c
1
M
1
2
- 2M
1z
)
(10.3f)
L= e +
(10.3g)
z
1
=z + LZ - t
(10.3h)
y
1
=y + LY
(10.3i)
x
1
=x + LX
(10.3j)
Refraction:
E′
=
1-
2
(1 -
E
1
2
)
(10.3k)
n
n
1
(c
1
M
1
2
-2M
1z
)

Z+ E
1
Optical Computation
309
Figure 10.4
Symbols used in skew raytracing Eqs. 10.4a through 10.4p. (a) The physical
meanings of the spatial coordinates (x, y, z) of the ray intersection with the surface and
of the ray direction cosines, X, Y,andZ.(b) Illustrating the system of subscript notation.
g
1
=E′
1
E
1
(10.3l)
Z
1
=
Z- g
1
c
1
z
1
+g
1
(10.3m)
Y
1
=
Y- g
1
c
1
y
1
(10.3n)
X
1
=
X- g
1
c
1
x
1
(10.3o)
Terms without subscript refer to the reference surface and the follow-
ing space. Terms subscripted with 1 refer to the first surface and the
following space.
The symbols have the following meanings:
x,y,z
The spatial coordinates of the ray intersection with the reference
surface.
x
1
,y
1
,z
1
The spatial coordinates of the ray intersection with surface #1.
M
1
The distance (vector) from the vertex of surface #1 to the ray, per-
pendicular to the ray.
M
1z
The z component of M
1
.
E
1
The cosine of the angle of incidence at surface #1.
L
The distance along the ray from the reference surface (x, y, z) to sur-
face #1 (x
1
,y
1
,z
1
). L
j
is the distance from surface j to j+1.
E′
1
The cosine of the angle of refraction (I′) at surface #1.
X,Y,Z
The direction cosines of the ray in the space between the reference
surface and surface #1 (before refraction).
X
1
,Y
1
,Z
1
The direction cosines after refraction by surface #1.
c
The curvature (reciprocal radius = 1/R) of the reference surface.
c
1
The curvature of surface #1.
n
The index between the reference surface and surface #1.
n′
The index following surface #1.
t
The axial spacing between the reference surface and surface #1.
Notice that the choice of the positive value for the square root in Eq.
10.3f  selects  that  intersection  of  the  ray  with  the  surface  which  is
nearer the surface vertex. Also, if the argument under the radical in
Eq. 10.3f is negative, it indicates that the ray misses (never intersects)
the spherical surface. If the argument under the radical in Eq. 10.3k
is negative, it indicates that the angle of incidence exceeds the critical
n
n
1
n
n
1
n
n
1
n
n
1
310
Chapter Ten
angle; the ray is thus subject to total internal reflection (TIR) and can-
not pass through the surface.
The calculation is opened by inserting c, two of the coordinates (x, y, z),
and two of the direction cosines (X, Y, Z) into Eqs. 10.3a and b and solv-
ing for the third coordinate and the third direction cosine. Then the
intersection of the ray with the first surface (x
1
,y
1
,z
1
) is determined
from Eqs. 10.3c  through 10.3j. Next the  ray  direction cosines  after
refraction at surface #1 (X
1
,Y
1
,Z
1
) are found from Eqs. 10.3k through
10.3o. This completes the raytrace through the first surface; at this
point Eqs. 10.3a and 10.3b (with unit subscripts) may be used to check
the accuracy of the computation.
To transfer to the second surface, the subscripts of Eqs. 10.3c through
10.3j are advanced by one, and x
2
,y
2
, and z
2
are determined. Similarly,
the direction cosines after refraction (X
2
,Y
2
,Z
2
) at surface #2 are found
by Eqs. 10.3k through 10.3o with the subscripts incremented.
This process is repeated until the intersection of the ray with the
final surface of the system, which is usually the image plane, has been
determined. This completes the calculation.
Note that any ray which intersects the axis is a meridional ray; thus
it  is  only  necessary  to  trace  skew  rays  from  off-axis  object  points.
Further, there is no loss of generality in assuming that the object point
lies in the y-z plane of the coordinate system (because we assume a
system with axial symmetry). Therefore, any skew ray can be started
with x equal to zero. When this is done, it is apparent that the two
halves of the optical system, in front of, and behind the y - z plane are
mirror  images  of  each  other  and  that  any  ray  X
k
 Y
k
 Z
k
passing
through x
k
, y
k
, z
k
has a mirror  image (-X
k
), Y
k
, Z
k
passing through
(-x
k
), y
k
, z
k
in the other half of the system. For this reason, it is only
necessary to trace skew rays through one-half of the system aperture;
rays through the other half are represented by the same data with the
signs of x and X reversed.
Example B
Using the lens of Example A, we will trace a skew ray originating in
the object plane (200 mm to the left of the lens) at a point 20 mm above
the axis. Thus, the ray intersection coordinates in the reference plane
(in this case, the object plane) are x = 0, y = +20, z = 0. If we set Y =
-0.1 and X = +0.1, the ray will intersect the first surface of the lens
approximately in the x-z plane, about 20 mm in front of the (optical)
zaxis. For the image surface we will use the paraxial focal plane as
computed in Example A. The calculation is shown in the table on the
next page.
Optical Computation
311
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested