c# open pdf adobe reader : Delete pages from pdf online control application platform web page html azure web browser smith_modern_optical_engineering33-part134

10.5 General, or Skew, Rays: Aspheric
Surfaces
For raytracing purposes, an aspheric surface of rotation is convenient-
ly represented by an equation of the form
z= f(x, y) =
+A
2
s
2
+A
4
s
4
+
...
+A
j
s
j
(10.4a)
where z is the longitudinal coordinate (abscissa) of a point on the sur-
face which is a distance s from the z axis. Using the same coordinate
system as Sec. 10.4, the radial distance s is related to coordinates y
and x by
s
2
=y
2
+x
2
(10.4b)
As shown in Fig. 10.5, the first term of the right-hand side of Eq. 10.4a
is the equation for a spherical surface of radius R = 1/c. The subse-
quent terms represent deformations to the spherical surface, with A
2
,
A
4
, etc., as the constants of the second, fourth, etc., power deformation
terms. Since any number of deformation terms may be included, Eq.
10.4a is quite flexible and can represent some rather extreme aspher-
cs
2

[1 + √1 - c
2
s
2
]
312
Chapter Ten
Example B—Skew Trace through a Sphere
First 
Second 
Object plane
surface
surface
Image plane
R
+50
-50
c
0.0
+0.02
-0.02
0.0
t
+200.
+15.
+65.517241
n
1.0
1.50
1.0
Transfer:
eby 10.3c
+199.989899
+12.188013
+71.860665
M
z
by 10.3d
-2.0201011
+1.590643
-3.468077
M
2
by 10.3e
+404.040418
+389.369720
107.475746
Eby 10.3f
+0.8588247
+0.8772472
+0.9224280
Lby 10.3g
+206.546141
+6.327736
+75.620392
zby 10.3h
(0.0)
+4.470247
-4.237125
0.000000
yby 10.3i
(+20.0)
-0.654614
-1.046031
-7.078610
xby 10.3j
(0.0)
+20.654614
+20.116291
-8.456088
Refraction:
E′ by 10.3k
+0.9398771
+0.6939135
gby 10.3l
+0.3673272
-0.6219573
Zby 10.3m
(+0.9899495)
+0.9944527
+0.9224280
Yby 10.3n
(-0.1)
-0.0618575
-0.0797745
Xby 10.3o
(+0.1)
-0.0850734
-0.3778396
Check:
zero by 10.3a
(0.0)
+0.0000001
-0.0000015
1.0 by 10.3b
(1.0)
1.0000000
1.0000001
Delete pages from pdf online - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pdf pages in preview; best pdf editor delete pages
Delete pages from pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page pdf acrobat reader; delete pages of pdf reader
ics. Note that Eq. 10.4a is redundant in that the second-order defor-
mation term (A
2
s
2
) is not necessary to specify the surface, since it can
be implicitly included in the curvature c. The importance of the inclu-
sion  of  this  term  is  that  otherwise  a  large  value  of  c (i.e., a  short
radius)  could  be  required  to  describe  the  surface,  and  rays  which
would actually intersect the aspheric surface might not intersect the
reference sphere. As can be seen from Example C, if necessary the ref-
erence sphere may be a plane.
Aspheric  surfaces  which  are  conic  sections (paraboloid,  ellipsoid,
hyperboloid) also can be represented by a power series; see Sec. 13.5
for further details.
The difficulty in tracing a ray through an aspheric surface lies in
determining  the point  of  intersection  of  the  ray  with the  aspheric,
since this cannot be determined directly. In the method given here,
this is accomplished by a series of approximations, which are contin-
ued until the error in the approximation is negligible.
The first step is to compute x
0
,y
0
, and z
0
, the intersection coordinates
of the ray with the spherical surface (of curvature c) which is usually
a fair approximation to the aspheric surface. This is done with Eqs.
10.3c through 10.3j of the preceding section.
Then the z coordinate of the aspheric (z
0
) corresponding to this dis-
tance from the axis is found by substituting s
0
2
=y
0
2
+x
0
2
into the equa-
tion for the aspheric (10.4a)
z
0
=f (y
0
,x
0
)
(10.4c)
Optical Computation
313
Figure 10.5
Showing the signifi-
cance of Eq. 10.4a, which defines
an aspheric surface by a defor-
mation from a reference spheri-
cal surface. The zcoordinate of a
point on the surface is the sum
of the z coordinate of the refer-
ence sphere and the sum of all
the deformation terms.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete blank pages in pdf files; cut pages from pdf preview
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete blank page in pdf online; delete pages from pdf acrobat reader
Then compute
l
0
=√1 - c
2
s
0
2
(10.4d)
m
0
=-y
0
[c + l
0
(2A
2
+4A
4
s
0
2
+
...
+jA
j
s
0
(j-2)
)]
(10.4e)
n
0
=-x
0
[c + l
0
(2A
2
+4A
4
s
0
2
+
...
+jA
j
s
0
(j-2)
)]
(10.4f)
G
0
=
(10.4g)
where X, Y, and Z are the direction cosines of the incident ray.
Now an improved approximation to the intersection coordinates is
given by
x
1
=G
0
X+ x
0
(10.4h)
y
1
=G
0
Y+ y
0
(10.4i)
z
1
=G
0
Z+ z
0
(10.4j)
The process is sketched in Fig. 10.6.
The approximation process is now repeated (from Eq. 10.4c to 10.4j)
until  the  error  is  negligible,  i.e.,  until  (after  k times  through  the
process)
z
k
=z
k
(10.4k)
to within sufficient accuracy for the purposes of the computation.
l
0
(z
0
- z
0
)

(Xl
0
+Ym
0
+Zn
0
)
314
Chapter Ten
Figure 10.6
Determination of the ray intersection with an aspheric
surface. The intersection is found by a convergent series of approx-
imations. Shown here are the relationships involved in finding the
first approximation after the intersection with the basic reference
sphere has been determined.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET
delete pages from pdf preview; delete page in pdf document
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete page in pdf preview; delete a page from a pdf
The refraction at the surface is carried through with the following
equations:
P
2
=l
k
2
+m
k
2
+n
k
2
(10.4l)
F= Zl
k
+Ym
k
+Xn
k
(10.4m)
F′ =
P
2
1-
+

F
2
(10.4n)
g=
F′ - 
F
(10.4o)
Z
1
=
Z+ gl
k
(10.4p)
Y
1
=
Y+ gm
k
(10.4q)
X
1
=
X+ gn
k
(10.4r)
This completes the trace through the aspheric. The spatial intersection
coordinates are x
k
, y
k
,and z
k
,and the new direction cosines are X
1
,Y
1
,
and Z
1
.
Example C
As  a numerical example, let  us trace the  path of a  ray through  a
paraboloidal mirror. The equation of a paraboloid with vertex at the
origin is
z=
and if we choose a concave mirror with a focal length of -5, the con-
stants of Eq. 10.4a become c = 0, A
2
=1/(4f) = -0.05, and A
4
,A
6
, etc.,
equal zero. Thus
z= -0.05s
2
=-0.05 (y
2
+x
2
)
We will place the initial reference plane at the vertex of the parabo-
la and the final reference (image) plane at the focal point. Thus t = 0
and t
1
=f = -5 (following our usual sign convention for distance after
reflections). We will trace the ray striking the reference plane at z = 0,
y = 0, x = 1.0 at a direction of Y = 0.1, X = 0, and (by Eq. 10.3b) 
s
2
4f
n
n
1
n
n
1
n
n
1
n
n
1
1
P
2
n
2
n
1
2
n
2
n
1
2
Optical Computation
315
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
delete pages from pdf in reader; delete page from pdf preview
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
add and delete pages from pdf; delete page on pdf reader
Z= 0.9949874. The index of refraction before reflection n equals 1.0
and the index after reflection n
1
will then be -1.0, again following the
convention of reversed signs after reflection.
The computation is indicated in the following tabulation, where the
applicable equation number is given in parentheses at each step. The
steps indicated by (10.4d) through (10.4c) are repeated top to bottom
until z
k
=z
k
to (in this instance) seven places past the decimal. The
fact that this example converged in only two cycles despite the fact
that c = 0 is a poor approximation to our paraboloid, is an indication
of the rapidity of convergence of this technique.
Reference surface: c
0
=0 t
0
=0.0 n
0
=1.0
Aspheric: z = -0.05s
2
c
1
=0 A
2
=-0.05 (A
4
,etc. = 0)
t
1
=-5.0 n
1
=-1.0
Image surface: c
2
=0
Given: z = 0, y = 0, x = +1.0
Z= +0.9949874 Y = +0.10 X = 0.0
Since c = 0 for the aspheric, it is obvious that z
0
=z = 0, y
0
=y = 0,
and x
0
=x = 1.0. Thus, z
0
=-0.05(y
2
+x
2
)= -0.05 (by Eq. 10.4c) and
z
0
-z
0
= -0.05. (The same results can be  obtained  from  Eqs. 10.3c
through j)
Intersection of Ray with Aspheric:
(10.4d)
l
0
=+1.0
l
1
=+1.0
(10.4e)
m
0
=0.0
m
1
=-0.0005025
(10.4f)
n
0
=+0.1
n
1
=+0.1
(10.4g)
G
0
=-0.0502519
G
1
=-0.0000013
(10.4h)
z
1
=-0.050
z
2
=-0.0500013
(10.4i)
y
1
=-0.0050252
y
2
=-0.0050253
(10.4j)
x
1
=+1.0
x
2
=+1.0
(10.4c)
z
1
=-0.0500013
z
2
=-0.0500013
z
1
-z
1
=-0.0000013
z
2
-z
2
=0.0000000
Refraction:
(10.4l)
P2 = +1.0100002
(10.4m)
F= +0.9949372
(10.4n)
F′ = +0.9949372
(10.4o)
g= +1.9701722
(10.4p)
Z
1
=+0.09751848
(10.4q)
Y
1
=-0.1009900
316
Chapter Ten
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. Explanation about transparency. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online. This
delete pages from a pdf file; delete pages from pdf acrobat
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pages from pdf; copy pages from pdf to word
(10.4r)
X
1
=+0.1970172
X
1
2+Y
1
2+Z
1
=1.0000001
Intersection of Ray with Image Surface:
(10.3c)
e
1
=-5.0246880
(10.3d)
M
2z
=+0.0499993
(10.3e)
M
2
=+0.2550229
(10.3f)
E
2
=+0.9751848
(10.3g)
L
2
=-5.0759596
(10.3h)
z
2
=0
(10.3i)
y
2
=+0.5075959
(10.3j)
x
2
=-0.0000513
10.6 Coddington’s Equations
The tangential and sagittal curvature of field can be determined by a
process which is equivalent to tracing paraxial rays along a principal
ray, instead of along the axis. In Chap. 3 it was pointed out that the
slope of the ray intercept plot was equal to Z
t
,the tangential field cur-
vature. This slope could be determined by tracing two closely spaced
meridional rays and computing
Z
t
=
=
and a similar process using close sagittal (skew) rays would yield Z
s
,
the sagittal field curvature.*
Coddington’s equations are equivalent to tracing a pair of infinitely
close rays, and the formulation has a marked similarity to the paraxi-
al raytracing equations. However, object and image distances as well
as surface-to-surface spacings are measured along the principal ray
instead of along the axis, and the surface power is modified for the
obliquity of the ray.
Figure 10.7 shows a principal ray  passing through a surface  with
sagittal and tangential ray fans originating at an object point and con-
verging to their focii. The distance along the ray from the surface to the
focus is symbolized by s and t for the object distance and by s′ and t′ for
the  image  distance. The sign  convention is as usual; if  the  focus or
object point is to the left of the surface, the distance is negative; to the
right, positive. In Fig. 10.7, s and t are negative, s′ and t′ are positive.
-∆H′

∆tan U′
H′
1
-H′
2

tan U′
2
-tan U′
1
Optical Computation
317
*Note that despite the currently almost universal use of zto represent the optical axis,
it is still common usage to symbolize field curvature as x
t
and x
s
.
The computation is carried out by tracing the principal ray through
the system using the meridional formulas of Sec. 10.3, determining the
oblique power for each surface by
= c (n′ cos I′ - n cos I)
(10.5a)
and determining the distance (D) from surface to surface along the ray
by Eq. 10.2m. The initial values of s and t are determined (Eq. 10.2m
is often useful in this regard) and then the focal distances are deter-
mined by solving the following equations for s′ and t′.
=
+
(sagittal)
(10.5b)
=
+
(tangential)
(10.5c)
The values of s and t for the next surface are given by
s
2
=s′
1
- D
(10.5d)
ncos
2
I
t
n′ cos
2
I′

t′
n
s
n′
s′
318
Chapter Ten
Figure 10.7
t
2
=t′
1
- D
(10.5e)
where D is the value given by Eq. 10.2m.
The calculation is repeated for each surface of the system; the final val-
ues of s′and t′ represent the distances along the ray from the last surface
to the final foci. The final curvature of field (with respect to a reference
plane an axial distance l′ from the last surface) can be found from
z
s
=s′ cos U′ + z - l′
(10.5f)
z
t
=t′ cos U′ + z - l′
(10.5g)
where z is determined for the last surface by Eq. 10.2l.
The preceding equations are ill-suited for use on an electronic com-
puter, since s and t may be too large for the machine capacity, or too
small (so that 1/s and 1/t become large). The following equations have
been developed to avoid this difficulty.  They make use of y
s
and y
t
,
which are fictional ray heights from the principal ray (analogous to the
paraxial ray heights used in Eqs. 10.1) and equally fictional ray slope-
index products P
s
and P
t
with respect to the principal ray.
The calculation is again begun by tracing a principal ray. The open-
ing equations are
P
s
=
(10.5h)
P
t
=
(10.5i)
where the data refer to the first surface of the system, and y
s
and y
t
are
arbitrarily chosen.
The ray slope-index product after refraction is determined from
P′
s
=P
s
- y
s
(10.5j)
P′
t
=P
t
- y
t
(10.5k)
where  is the  oblique surface power given  by Eq. 10.5a.  The  “ray
height” at the next surface is given by
(y
s
)
2
=(y
s
)
1
+
(10.5l)
(y
t
)
2
=
(y
t
)
1
+
(10.5m)
At surface #2, the incident ray slope-index product is given by P
2
=P′
1
.
(P′
t
)
1
D

n′
1
cos
2
I′
1
cos
2
I′
1
cos
2
I
2
(P′
s
)
1
D
n′
1
-ny
t
cos
2
I

t
-ny
s
s
Optical Computation
319
This process is repeated for each surface of the system, and the final
image distances at the last surface are found from:
s′ =
(10.5n)
t′ =
(10.5o)
The final curvature of field is found from Eqs. 10.5f and g.
Example D
We will use the meridional ray traced in Example A as the principal
ray and trace  close sagittal and tangential  rays about  it,  assuming
that the object point is at the axial intercept of the ray, i.e., on the axis
and 200 mm to the left of the first surface. (From a practical stand-
point, this will be equivalent to determining the imagery of the lens
when used with a small pinhole diaphragm located 20 mm (radially)
away from the axis.)
To find the initial values for s and t, we determine z at the first sur-
face by Eq. 10.2l (using the raytrace data from Example A for the first
surface). Then
s= t =
=
=-205.445587
The oblique surface powers are determined from Eq. 10.5a as
1
=+0.02 (1.5 × 0.942809 - 1.0 × 0.866025) = + 0.0109638
2
=-0.02 (1.0 × 0.701248 × -1.5 × 0.879835) = + 0.0123701
Equation 10.2m gives the distance along the ray between surfaces as
D=
=+6.429045
then for the first surface
=
+0.0109638
s′ = + 246.0488
=
+0.0109638
0.750

-205.445
1.5 (0.942809)
2

t′
1

-205.445
1.5
s′
15.0 - 4.415778 + (-4.177626)

0.996508
-200 - 4.415778

0.994987
l-z
cos U
-n′y
t
cos
2
I′

P′
t
-n′y
s
P′
s
320
Chapter Ten
t′ = +182.3186
We transfer to surface #2 by Eqs. 10.5d and e to get
s
2
=+239.6198
t
2
=+175.8896
Then using Eqs. 10.5b and c for the second surface
=
+0.0123701
s′
2
=+ 53.6768
=
+0.0123701
t′
2
=+ 25.9200
By setting l′ in Eqs. 10.5f and g equal to +45.6310 (the final intercept
of the marginal ray traced in Example A), we find that, with respect to
this point,
z
s
=49.8086-4.1776-45.6310 = 0.00
z
t
=24.0521-4.1776-45.6310 = -25.7565
One may gain an understanding of this rather interesting result by
sketching the path of a few rays in a system of the type we have ray-
traced, remembering that a simple biconvex lens is afflicted with a
large undercorrected spherical aberration. Alternatively, a study of
the  ray  intercept  curve  for  undercorrected  spherical  (with  coordi-
nates rotated to account for the shift of the reference plane to the
focus of the marginal ray) will indicate the meaning of the value of z
t
found above.
10.7 Aberration Determination
This  section  will  briefly  indicate  the  computational  procedures
involved in determining the numerical values of the various aberra-
tions discussed in Chap. 3. Since this discussion will be somewhat con-
densed, the reader may wish to review Chap. 3 at this point.
We will assume that the paraxial focal distance l′ (from the vertex of
the last surface of the system to the paraxial image) has been deter-
mined. It is also useful to predetermine the size and location of the
entrance pupil.
1.161164

175.8896
0.491748

t′
1.5

239.6198
1
s′
Optical Computation
321
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested