c# open pdf adobe reader : Best pdf editor delete pages Library software component .net windows azure mvc The_Social_Security_Administration_Accessible_Document_Authoring_Guide_2.1.20-part1359

Best pdf editor delete pages - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete blank pages from pdf file; delete blank page from pdf
Best pdf editor delete pages - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete a page from a pdf in preview; delete pages from pdf in reader
C# PDF Print Library: Print PDF documents in C#.net, ASP.NET
WPF Viewer & Editor. WPF: View PDF. WPF: Annotate Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. A best PDF printer control for Visual Studio .NET and
cut pages out of pdf online; delete pages of pdf
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
A best HTML5 PDF viewer control for PDF Document reading on ASP.NET web based application An advanced PDF editor enable C# users to edit PDF text, image
delete pages pdf online; delete pdf pages in preview
CONTENTS
0. Introduction ............................................................................................................... 1
0.0. About this guide .................................................................................................. 1
Version information, and suggested citation and copyright .................................. 1
Comments and suggestions ................................................................................. 1
Required Software ................................................................................................ 1
Conventions used in this guide ............................................................................. 1
Not in this guide… ................................................................................................ 2
0.1. Reading technologies, and implications for document design ............................ 3
The (alternate) user interface ............................................................................... 3
Visual versus programmatic formatting ................................................................ 4
Implications for the design of documents ............................................................. 8
1. Producing Accessible Word Documents .............................................................. 11
1.0. Preparation ....................................................................................................... 11
Views and panes ................................................................................................ 11
Showing formatting characters and marks on the document .............................. 16
Avoid automatic formatting ................................................................................. 17
1.1. Formatting ......................................................................................................... 19
1.1.1. Use Styles for formatting .......................................................................... 19
1.1.2. Format paragraph line spacing with styles................................................ 26
1.1.3. Use list formatting ..................................................................................... 27
1.1.4. Use Column formatting ............................................................................. 29
1.1.5. Do Not Use Hyphenation .......................................................................... 31
1.1.6. Do Not Use Drop Caps ............................................................................. 32
1.1.7. Convert text boxes to regular paragraphs................................................. 33
1.2. Navigation ......................................................................................................... 37
1.2.1. Place document titles in the main document; not the 'Header' area ......... 37
1.2.2. Use Heading Levels in style formatting..................................................... 39
1.2.3. Use automation if creating a Table of Contents ........................................ 41
1.3. Language .......................................................................................................... 44
1.3.1. Set the language properties ...................................................................... 44
1.4. Fonts ................................................................................................................. 46
1.4.1. Use System Fonts .................................................................................... 46
1.5. Graphics / images ............................................................................................. 49
1.5.1. Add Alternate Text to graphics / images ................................................... 49
1.5.2. Group Complex Objects ........................................................................... 53
1.5.3. Place graphics / images 'in line' ................................................................ 55
1.5.4. Avoid (or carefully control) text rendered as images ................................. 57
1.6. Tables ............................................................................................................... 62
1.6.1. Remove table formatting applied to non-tabular information .................... 62
1.6.2. Set the header row as 'repeating' ............................................................. 63
1.6.3. Remove text wrapping around tables ....................................................... 65
1.7. Links ................................................................................................................. 67
1.7.1. Assign link names that make sense when spoken in isolation .................. 67
1.7.2. Where possible, do not allow links to span two lines of text ..................... 68
1.8. Color ................................................................................................................. 69
1.8.1. Use text colors that contrast with their backgrounds ................................ 69
1.8.2. Use automatic color settings for black text and white text ........................ 70
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Best PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET for converting PDF to image in C#.NET application. Converter control easy to create thumbnails from PDF pages.
cut pages from pdf; acrobat extract pages from pdf
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
WPF Viewer & Editor. WPF: View PDF. WPF: Annotate PDF. Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. Best PDF Viewer control as well as a powerful .NET
delete a page from a pdf without acrobat; delete page from pdf acrobat
ii 
1.8.3. Provide redundancy for information presented in color ............................ 71
1.9. Document properties ......................................................................................... 73
1.9.1. Set the document title in document properties .......................................... 73
2. Converting from Word to PDF ................................................................................ 75
2.0. Essential concepts ............................................................................................ 75
Easy ways and hard ways to make an accessible PDF ...................................... 75
Conversion is one-way, with no going back ........................................................ 77
2.1. Conversion from Word to PDF .......................................................................... 80
2.1.1. Configure Conversion Preferences ........................................................... 80
2.1.2. Convert the document with the 'PDF Maker' application in Word ............. 85
3. Checking and fixing accessibility issues in PDF documents ............................. 87
3.0. Preparation ....................................................................................................... 87
The 'Accessibility Full Check'.............................................................................. 87
The Reflow view ................................................................................................. 91
The Read Out Loud feature ................................................................................ 91
Other guidance and Help .................................................................................... 92
Limited 'Undo' capabilities in Acrobat Pro during accessibility remediation ........ 93
3.1. Reading order ................................................................................................... 94
3.1.1. The initial view is set properly? ................................................................. 94
3.1.2. The reading order is correct? .................................................................... 96
3.1.3. Lists have the correct tag structure? ......................................................... 98
3.1.4. The tab order of pages is set? ................................................................ 100
3.1.5. Artifacts are correctly placed outside of the reading order? .................... 100
3.2. Navigation ....................................................................................................... 102
3.2.1. Bookmarks are set correctly? ................................................................. 102
3.2.2. Headings are set correctly? .................................................................... 102
3.2.3. Dynamic tables of contents are working? ............................................... 104
3.3. Language ........................................................................................................ 105
3.3.1. The Language(s) have been defined? .................................................... 105
3.4. Fonts ............................................................................................................... 107
3.4.1. Character Mappings have worked properly? .......................................... 107
3.5. Graphics / images ........................................................................................... 108
3.5.1. Alternate Text is added to Information-Type images? ............................ 108
3.6. Tables ............................................................................................................. 109
3.6.1. Table Tags are set? ................................................................................ 109
3.7. Links ............................................................................................................... 112
3.7.1. Links make sense when spoken in isolation? ......................................... 112
3.7.2. Links (where possible) are on only one line of text? ............................... 112
3.8. Color ............................................................................................................... 114
3.8.1. High-Contrast color combinations are used? .......................................... 114
3.8.2. Color is only used redundantly? ............................................................. 115
3.9. Document properties ....................................................................................... 116
3.9.1. Document properties are properly set?................................................... 116
Attachments .............................................................................................................. 117
Word Document Accessibility Checklist ............................................................ 119
PDF Document Accessibility Checklist ............................................................. 121
Reader's Notes ................................................................................................. 123
Agency-Specific Information (SSA) .................................................................. 125
C# PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in C#.net, ASP
WPF Viewer & Editor. WPF: View PDF. WPF: Annotate Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. A best PDF annotation SDK control for Visual Studio .NET
delete page from pdf file; delete page from pdf online
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
A best PDF document SDK library enable users abilities to read and extract PDF form data in Visual C#.NET WinForm and ASP.NET WebForm applications.
delete page from pdf document; reader extract pages from pdf
SSA Guide: Producing Accessible Word and PDF Documents. Version 2.1, April 2010 
0. Introduction 
0.0. About this guide
Version information, and suggested citation and copyright 
SSA Guide: Producing Accessible Word and PDF documents Version 2.1, 
April 2010. 
This guide is produced by the Social Security Administration Accessibility 
Resource Center (ARC). 
For a suggested citation and copyright status of this document, see the 
last page of this document
Comments and suggestions 
Please email comments and suggestions on this guide to the ARC at: 
section508.developer@ssa.gov
Required Software 
For producing accessible Word documents: 
Windows XP or Vista 
Office 2007 (including Word 2007) 
For converting Word Documents to accessible PDF (Portable Document 
Format) Files: 
Adobe Reader 
Acrobat Pro 8.1 
Important: version 8.1 is a minimum requirement. Version 8.0 
will not work properly. 
CommonLook Plug-In for Acrobat Pro 
Conventions used in this guide 
Menu commands are in bold, and underlined text
Keystrokes have an outline, e.g.: 
CTRL
+
ALT
+
Delete
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
with .NET PDF Library. A best PDF annotator for Visual Studio .NET supports to add text box to PDF file in Visual C#.NET project.
delete a page from a pdf acrobat; delete pages out of a pdf file
C# PDF Markup Drawing Library: add, delete, edit PDF markups in C#
in C# Program. A best PDF annotator control for Visual Studio .NET support to markup PDF with various annotations in C#.NET class.
delete page on pdf document; delete page from pdf reader
SSA Guide: Producing Accessible Word and PDF Documents 
Not in this guide… 
This is not a guide to using Word and/or Adobe Acrobat 
Pro: This guide provides information on how to use certain 
features in MS Word and Adobe Acrobat Pro in order to make 
documents more accessible for people with disabilities. This 
guide is not intended as a replacement for general training on 
how to use these applications. 
This is not a guide for producing Braille or Large Print 
documents: This guide addresses accessibility-related features 
of documents for reading on a computer. 
PDF Forms are not covered in this guide. 
An Introduction to accessibility and Section 508: For a 
general introduction to accessibility and requirements of Section 
508 of the Rehabilitation Act, see the resources and training 
materials at: 
The GSA Section 508 website: http://www.section508.gov/
C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
Best PDF document reader SDK control that can highlight PDF text in Visual C# .NET framework C#.NET Demo Code: Highlight Text in Consecutive PDF Pages.
delete pages on pdf online; cut pages out of pdf file
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
application. Free online C# source codes provide best ways to create PDF forms and delete PDF forms in C#.NET framework project. A
delete pages of pdf reader; add or remove pages from pdf
SSA Guide: Producing Accessible Word and PDF Documents. Version 2.1, April 2010 
0.1. Reading technologies, and implications for 
document design
The (alternate) user interface 
Documents can be printed out or read on a computer. Accessibility 
considerations are important for both print and electronic document 
formats, but in this guide we are mostly interested in reading documents 
on computers. 
The User Interface is the means by which inputs (controls) are relayed to 
the computer so that the desired output (display) of information (in this 
case, document content) is presented to the user. 
In regular operation, users can use their eyes, ears, voice and hands to 
provide inputs and perceive outputs. Typically, the computer screen, audio 
speakers, keyboard, and mouse are used. 
When someone who has a sensory or a physical disability is reading a 
document on a computer, one or more of the regular input / output 
capabilities can be diminished or unavailable. For example: 
Someone who is totally blind  cannot use their eyes, so they 
cannot see the screen and they cannot use the mouse (the 
mouse requires eye-hand coordination). Instead, they can use 
talking software, called a Screen Reader to hear the information 
that is ordinarily shown on screen, and they use the keyboard to 
control the Screen Reader software. 
Someone who has low vision  has a diminished ability to use the 
screen. They can compensate by using Screen Magnification 
software. Depending on their preferences, they may use a 
combination of Screen Magnification and Screen Reader 
software. 
SSA Guide: Producing Accessible Word and PDF Documents 
Someone who has no ability to use hands may use Speech 
Recognition software to control the computer. They cannot use 
the keyboard or mouse, so all commands are spoken (e.g., 
"Page Up... Page Up... Move to Top..."). 
The key point is that people with disabilities (PWDs) can use an 
alternative mode of input and/or output when the ordinary method is 
unavailable. The words and meaning of the document remain the same, it 
is only the information delivery and user control mechanisms that differ. 
It is important to know that in order for these alternate interface 
mechanisms to work, the documents need to be designed to be 
accessible. Attention must be paid to certain design details (covered in 
this guide) in order to make it possible for technologies such as Screen 
Readers, Screen Magnifiers, and Speech Recognition Software to be able 
to work with individual documents. Without attending to these design 
details, many PWDs will find it difficult or impossible to read your 
documents. 
Visual versus programmatic formatting 
To a sighted reader of a document, a 'heading' looks like a heading when 
it is visually formatted differently to other text. Things like centering, bold, 
underlining and capitalization can all be used to differentiate a chunk of 
text to look like a 'heading'. Formatting of this kind (bold, underline, etc.) 
can also be used within paragraphs, to emphasize certain words. The 
problem for Screen Reader software is that because this type of formatting 
can be applied in either a heading or a paragraph of text, there is no way 
for the software to detect which one it is—is it a heading or a regular 
paragraph? 
SSA Guide: Producing Accessible Word and PDF Documents. Version 2.1, April 2010 
With a page of text that is laid out with headings differentiated only by 
visual formatting (bold, underline etc.), the way the Screen Reader 
software interprets the page is analogous to single, continuous block of 
text: 
It is clear that for a sighted reader, removing the visual formatting of 
headings makes the page much more difficult to read. But for a non-
sighted user, the text is spoken only one word at a time, with no way to 
skip over sections to the next heading. In fact, when only visual formatting 
is applied to the text, the Screen Reader can employ only very limited 
reading commands such as: 
read previous/next word, 
read previous/next paragraph, 
go to the beginning/end of the document. 
What is missing is a programmatic identification of headings in the 
document. This can be applied easily by use of styles in MS Word. The 
heading can still look the same way as it did before (bold, underline etc.), 
but some non-visible code gets added to the piece of text that says, 
(essentially) 'this is a heading'. 
SSA Guide: Producing Accessible Word and PDF Documents 
In MS Word and in PDFs, heading styles can be applied programmatically. 
The heading styles can have associated levels, just as with visual 
differentiation (i.e., level 1, level 2, level 3 etc.) to give a hierarchical 
structure to a document's content. When heading styles are applied, the 
Screen Reader software can, at the command of the user, jump to the 
next heading in the document: 
Now, with heading styles applied, the list of commands available to the 
Screen Reader expands to include: 
Jump to next/previous heading, 
Jump to next/previous heading of level n., 
Display a list of all the headings in this document. 
Sort the list of headings alphabetically or in the order they 
appear in the document. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested