c# open pdf adobe reader : Cut pages out of pdf online application SDK tool html winforms asp.net online smith_modern_optical_engineering4-part141

image plane as a function of h, the position of the ray in the object
plane, and y, the position of the ray in the aperture of the optical sys-
tem. If the system is symmetrical about an axis (called the optical axis)
the power series expansion has only odd power terms (in which the
sum of the exponents of h and y add up to 1, 3, 5, etc.) The first-order
terms of this expansion effectively describe the position and size of the
image. (See Eqs. 3.1 and 3.2 for the equations.)
First-order (or gaussian) optics is often referred to as the optics of
perfect optical systems. The first-order equations can be derived by
reducing the  exact  trigonometrical expressions for ray paths  to  the
limit when the angles and ray heights involved approach zero. These
equations  are  completely  accurate  for  an  infinitesimal  threadlike
region about the optical axis, known as the paraxial region. The value
of first-order expressions lies in the fact that a well-corrected optical
system will follow the first-order expressions almost exactly and also
that the first-order image positions and sizes provide a convenient ref-
erence from which to measure departures from perfection. In addition,
the paraxial expressions are linear and are much easier to use than
the trigonometrical equations.
We shall begin this chapter by considering the manner in which a
“perfect”  optical  system  forms  an  image,  and  we  will  discuss  the
expressions which allow the location and size of the image to be found
when the basic characteristics of the optical system are known. Then
we will take up the determination of these basic characteristics from
the constructional parameters of an optical system. Finally, methods
of image calculation by paraxial ray-tracing will be discussed.
2.2 Cardinal Points of an Optical System
Awell-corrected optical system can be treated as a “black box” whose
characteristics are defined by its cardinal points, which are its first
and second focal points, its first and second principal points, and its
first  and  second  nodal  points. The  focal points  are  those  points at
which light rays (from an infinitely distant axial object point) parallel
to the optical axis* are brought to a common focus on the axis. If the
rays entering the  system  and  those  emerging  from  the  system  are
extended until they intersect, the points of intersection will define a
surface, usually referred to as the principal plane. In a well-corrected
optical  system  the  principal  surfaces  are  spheres,  centered  on  the
22
Chapter Two
*The optical axis is a line through the centers of curvature of the surfaces which make
up the optical system. It is the common axis of rotation for an axially symmetrical opti-
cal system. Note that in real life, systems of more than two surfaces do not have a
unique axis, because three or more real points are rarely aligned on a straight line.
Cut pages out of pdf online - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page in pdf file; delete pages of pdf
Cut pages out of pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete a page from a pdf in preview; delete page in pdf reader
object and image. In the paraxial region where the distances from the
axis  are  infinitesimal,  the  surfaces  can  be  treated  as  if  they  were
planes, hence the name, principal “planes.” The intersection of this
surface with the axis is the principal point. The “second” focal point
and the “second” principal point are those defined by rays approaching
the system from the left. The “first” points are those defined by rays
from the right.
The effective focal length (efl) of a system is the distance from the
principal point to the focal point. The back focal length (bfl), or back
focus, is the distance from the vertex of the last surface of the system
to the second focal point. The front focal length (ffl) is the distance from
the  front  surface  to  the  first  focal  point.  These  are  illustrated  in 
Fig. 2.1.
The nodal  points are  two  axial  points  such  that  a  ray  directed
toward the first nodal point appears (after passing through the sys-
tem)  to emerge  from  the second  nodal  point parallel  to  its original
direction.  The  nodal  points  of  an  optical  system  are  illustrated  in 
Fig. 2.2 for an ordinary thick lens element. When an optical system is
bounded on both sides by air (as is true in the great majority of appli-
cations), the nodal points coincide with the principal points.
Unless otherwise indicated, we will assume that our optical systems
are  axially  symmetrical  and  are  bounded  by  air.  Equations  2.11
through 2.15 cover the case where the surrounding medium is not air.
Image Formation (First-Order Optics)
23
Figure 2.1
Illustrating the location of the focal points and principal points of
a generalized optical system.
Figure 2.2
Aray directed toward
the first nodal point (N
1
) of an
optical system emerges from the
system without angular devia-
tion and appears to come from
the second nodal point (N
2
).
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark can view PDF document in single page or continue pages. Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete page from pdf document; delete a page from a pdf file
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in can view PDF document in single page or continue pages. Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
cut pages from pdf file; delete a page from a pdf
The power of a lens or of an optical system is the reciprocal of its
effective focal length; power is usually symbolized by the Greek letter
phi (). If the focal length is given in meters, the power (in recipro-
cal meters) is measured in diopters. The dimension of power is recip-
rocal distance, e.g., in
-1
, mm
-1
, cm
-1
, etc.
2.3 Image Position and Size
When the cardinal points of an optical system are known, the location
and  size  of  the  image formed  by  the optical  system  can  be readily
determined. In Fig. 2.3, the focal points F
1
and F
2
and the principal
points P
1
and P
2
of an optical system are shown; the object which the
system is to image is  shown as  the arrow AO. Ray OB, parallel to 
the system axis, will pass through the second focal point F
2
; the refrac-
tion will appear to have occurred at the second principal plane. The
ray OF
1
Cpassing through the first focal point F
1
will emerge from the
system parallel to the axis. (Since the path of light rays is reversible,
this is equivalent to starting a ray from the right at O′ parallel to the
axis; the ray is then refracted through F
1
in accordance with the defi-
nition of the first focal point in Sec. 2.2.)
The intersection of these two rays at point O′ locates the image of
point O. A similar construction for other points on the object would
locate  additional  image points, which would lie along  the indicated
arrow O′A′. A plane object normal to the axis is imaged as a plane, also
normal to the axis. See Sec. 2.14 for a tilted object.
Athird ray could be constructed from O to the first nodal point; this
ray would appear to emerge from the second nodal point and would be
parallel to the entering ray. If the object and image are both in air, the
nodal  points  coincide  with  the  principal  points,  and  such  a  ray  is
drawn from O to P
1
and from P
2
to O′, as indicated by the dashed line
in Fig. 2.3.
At this point in our discussion, it is necessary to adopt a convention
for  the algebraic signs given to the various distances involved. The 
24
Chapter Two
Figure 2.3
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
and easy to use .NET solution for developers to crop / cut out image file This online tutorial page will illustrate the image cropping function from following
delete page from pdf file; delete page pdf online
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Best VB.NET PDF text extraction SDK library and component for Online Visual Basic .NET class source code for quick
delete page on pdf document; delete pages pdf online
following conventions are used by most workers in the field of optics.
There is nothing sacrosanct about these conventions, and many opti-
cal workers adopt their own, but the use of some consistent sign con-
vention is a practical necessity.
1. Heights  above  the  optical  axis  are  positive  (e.g.,  OA and P
2
B).
Heights below the axis are negative (P
1
Cand A′O′).
2. Distances measured to the left of a reference point are negative; to
the right, positive. Thus P
1
Ais negative and P
2
A′ is positive.
3. The focal length of a converging lens is positive and the focal length
of a diverging lens is negative.
Image position
Figure 2.4 is identical to Fig. 2.3 except that the distances have been
given single letters; the heights of the object and image are labeled h
and h′, the focal lengths are f and f′, the object and image distances
(from the principal planes) are s and s′, and the distances from focal
point to object and image are x and x′, respectively. According to our
sign convention, h f, f′, x′, and s′ are positive as shown, and x, s, and h′
are negative. Note that the primed symbols refer to dimensions asso-
ciated with the image and the unprimed symbols to those associated
with the object.
From similar triangles we can write
=
and
=
(2.1)
Setting the right-hand members of each equation equal and clearing
fractions, we get
ff ′ = - xx′
(2.2)
If we assume the optical system to be in air, then f will be equal to f′ and
f′
x′
h
(-h′)
(-x)
f
h
(-h′)
Image Formation (First-Order Optics)
25
Figure 2.4
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Free online source code for extracting text from adobe Ability to extract highlighted text out of PDF C# example code for text extraction from all PDF pages.
add and delete pages in pdf; delete pages on pdf online
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete page from pdf acrobat; delete page from pdf online
x′ =
(2.3)
This is the “newtonian” form of the image equation and is very useful
for calculations where the locations of the focal points are known.
If we substitute x = s + f and x′ = s′ - f in Eq. 2.3, we can derive
another expression for the location of the image, the “gaussian” form.
f
2
=- xx′ = - (s + f) (s′ - f)
=- ss′ + sf - s′f + f
2
Canceling out the f
2
terms and dividing through by ss′f, we get
=
+
(2.4)
or alternatively,
s′ =
or
f=
(2.5)
Image size
The lateral (or transverse) magnification of an optical system is given
by the ratio of image size to object size, h′/h. By rearranging Eq. 2.1,
we get for the magnification m,
m=
=
=
(2.6)
Substituting x = s + f in this expression to get
m=
=
and noting from Eq. 2.5 that f/(s+f) is equal to s′/s, we find that
m=
=
(2.7a)
Other useful relations are
s′ = f (1 - m)
(2.7b)
s= f
-1
(2.7c)
1
m
s′
s
h′
h
f
(s + f)
h′
h
-x′
f
f
x
h′
h
ss′
(s - s′)
sf
(s + f)
1
s
1
f
1
s′
-f
2
x
26
Chapter Two
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete pages pdf files; delete a page in a pdf file
C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#
Free online C# sample code can help users to fill in fill in form field in specified position of adobe PDF file. Able to fill out all PDF form field in C#.NET.
delete pages from pdf online; delete pages pdf
Note that Eqs. 2.3 through 2.7 assume that both object and image are
in air and also that Figs. 2.3 and 2.4 show a negative magnification.
Longitudinal  magnification is the magnification along the optical
axis, i.e., the magnification of the longitudinal thickness of the object
or the magnification of a longitudinal motion along the axis. If s
1
and
s
2
denote the distances to the front and back edges of the object and s′
1
and s′
2
denote the distances to the corresponding edges of the image,
then the longitudinal magnification m
is, by definition,
m
=
Substituting Eq. 2.5 for the primed distances and manipulating, we
get
m
=
̇
=m
1
̇m
2
(2.8)
noting that m = s′/s. As (s′
2
-s′
1
) and (s
2
-s
1
) approach zero, then m
1
approaches m
2
, and
m
=m
2
(2.9)
This  indicates that  longitudinal magnification is  ordinarily positive
and that object and image always move in the same direction.
Example A
Given an optical system with a positive focal length of 10 in, find the
position and size of the image formed of an object 5 in high which is
located 40 in to the left of the first focal point of the system.
Using the newtonian equation, we get, by substituting in Eq. 2.3,
x′ =
=
=+ 2.5 in
Therefore the image is located 2.5 in to the right of the second focal
point. To find the image height, we use Eq. 2.6.
m=
=
=
=-0.25
h′ = mh = (-0.25) (5) = -1.25 in
Thus if the base of the object were on the optical axis and the top of the
object 5 in above it, the base of the image would also lie on the axis and
the image of the top would lie 1.25 in below the axis.
The gaussian equations can be used for this calculation by noting
that the distance from the first principal plane to the object is given by
s= x - f = -40 - 10 = -50; then, by Eq. 2.4,
10
-40
f
x
h′
h
-10
2
-40
- f
2
x
s′
2
s
2
s′
1
s
1
s′
2
-s′
1
s
2
-s
1
Image Formation (First-Order Optics)
27
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET PDF page and zoom in or zoom out PDF page
delete page pdf; delete pages of pdf reader
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Online Guide for Using RasterEdge WPF PDF Viewer to View PDF pages, zoom in or zoom out PDF pages and go to
delete pages in pdf; delete pages from pdf without acrobat
=
+
=
+
=0.1 - 0.02 = 0.08
s′ =
=12.5 in
and the image is found to lie 12.5 in to the right of the second princi-
pal plane (or 2.5 in to the right of the second focal point, in agreement
with the previous solution).
The height of the image can now be determined from Eq. 2.7a.
m=
=
=+
=-0.25
h′ = mh = (-0.25) (5) = -1.25 in
Example B
If the object of Example A is located 2 in to the right of the first focal
point, as shown in Fig. 2.5, where is the image and what is its height?
Using Eq. 2.3,
x′ =
=
=-50 in
Notice that the image is formed to the left of the second focal point; in
fact, if the optical system is of moderate thickness, the image is to the
left of the optical system and also to the left of the object. From Eq. 2.6
we get the magnification
m=
=
=
=+ 5
h′ = mh = (5) (5) = +25 in
The magnification and image height are both positive. In this case the
image is a virtual image. A screen placed at the image position will not
have an image formed on it, but the image may be observed by viewing
through the lens from the right. A positive sign for the lateral magnifi-
cation of a simple lens indicates that the image formed is virtual; a neg-
10
2
f
x
h′
h
-10
2
+2
-f
2
x
12.5
-50
s′
s
h′
h
1
0.08
1
(-50)
1
10
1
s
1
f
1
s′
28
Chapter Two
Figure  2.5
Illustrating the  for-
mation of a virtual image. See
Example B.
ative sign for the magnification of a simple lens indicates a real image.
Figure 2.5 shows the relationships in this example.
Example C
If the object of Example B is 0.1 in thick, what is the apparent thick-
ness of the image? Since the lateral magnification was found to be 5
times  in  example  B,  the  longitudinal  magnification,  by  Eq.  2.9,  is
approximately 5
2
, or 25. Thus the apparent image thickness is approx-
imately 25 times (0.1 in), or 2.5 in. If an exact value for the apparent
thickness is required, the image position for each surface of the object
must be calculated. Assuming that the front of the object was given in
Example B as 2 in to the right of the first focal point, then its rear sur-
face must lie 1.9 in to the right of f
1
. Its image is located at
x′ =
=
=-52.63 in
to the left of the second focal point. Thus the distance between the
image positions for the front and rear surfaces is 2.63 in, in reasonable
agreement with the approximate result of 2.5 in. Had we computed the
thickness for the case where the front and back surfaces of the object
were 1.95 and 2.05 in from the focal point, the results from the exact
and approximate calculations would have been in even better agree-
ment, yielding an image thickness of 2.502 in.
Optical systems not immersed in air
If the object and image are not in air, as assumed in the preceding
paragraphs,  the  following  equations  should  be  used  instead  of  the
standard expressions of Eqs. 2.2 through 2.9.
Assume an optical system with an object-side medium of index n,
and an image-side medium of index n′. The first and second effective
focal lengths, f and f′, respectively, may differ; they are related by
=
(2.10)
The focal lengths can be determined by a ray-tracing calculation, just as
with an air-immersed system. For example, f′ = -y
1
/u′
k
(see Eq. 2.34).
Object and image distances
=
+
=
+
(2.11)
x′ =
(2.12)
-ff′
x
n′
f′
n
s
n
f
n
s
n′
s′
f′
n′
f
n
-100
1.9
-f
2
x
Image Formation (First-Order Optics)
29
Magnifications
m=
=
=
=
(2.13)
for an object at infinity,
h′ = fu
p
=f ′u
p
n/n′
(2.14)
m
=
=
(note that m
m
2
)
(2.15)
Focal point to nodal point distance equals the other focal length.
2.4 Refraction of a Light Ray at a Single
Surface
As mentioned in Chap. 1, the path of a light ray through an optical sys-
tem can be calculated from Snell’s law (Eq. 1.3) by the application of a
modest amount of geometry and trigonometry. Figure 2.6 shows a light
ray (GQP) incident on a spherical surface at point Q. The ray is direct-
ed toward point P where it would intersect the optical axis at a dis-
tance L from  the  surface  if the ray were  extended. At Q the ray is
refracted by the surface and intersects the axis at P′, a distance L′
from the surface. The surface has a radius R with center of curvature
at C and separates two media of index n on the left and index n′ on the
right. The light ray makes an angle U with the axis before refraction,
U′ after refraction; angle I is the angle between the incident ray and
the normal to the surface (HQC) at point Q, and angle I′ is the angle
between  the  refracted  ray  and  the  normal.  Notice  that  plain  or
unprimed symbols are used for quantities before refraction at the sur-
face; after refraction, the symbols are primed.
The sign conventions which we shall observe are as follows:
1. A radius is positive if the center of curvature lies to the right of the
surface.
2. As before, distances to the right of the surface are positive; to the
left, negative.
3. The angles of incidence and refraction (I and I′) are positive if the
ray is rotated clockwise to reach the normal.
4. The slope angles (U and U′) are positive if the ray is rotated clockwise
to reach the axis. (Historical Note: Until the latter part of the twenti-
eth century, the accepted convention for the sign of the slope was the
reverse of the current one, and Fig. 2.6 was an “all-positive diagram.”)
ff′
x
2
∆s′
∆s
-x′
f′
f
x
ns′
n′s
h′
h
30
Chapter Two
5. The light travels from left to right.
(In Fig. 2.6 all quantities are positive except U and U′, which are neg-
ative.)
Aset of equations which will allow us to trace the path for the ray
may be derived as follows. From right triangle PAC,
CA = (R - L) sin U
(2.16)
and from right triangle QAC,
sin I =
(2.17)
Applying Snell’s law (Eq. 1.3), we get the sine of the angle of refrac-
tion,
sin I′ =
sin I
(2.18)
The exterior angle QCO of triangle PQC is equal to -U + I, and, as
the exterior angle of triangle P′QC, it is also equal to -U′ + I′. Thus
-U + I = -U′ + I′, and
U′ = U-I + I′
(2.19)
From right triangle QA′C we get
sin I′ =
(2.20)
and substituting Eqs. 2.17 and 2.20 into Eq. 2.18 gives us
CA′
R
n
n′
CA
R
Image Formation (First-Order Optics)
31
Figure 2.6
Refraction of a ray at a spherical surface.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested