c# open pdf adobe reader : Delete blank pages in pdf online application software tool html winforms azure online SickWater_screen6-part16

61
Shadow pricing is a valuation methodology that can be used to 
assess choices regarding activities discharging by-products which, 
although they have no market value, may have significant envi-
ronmental impact, such as wastewater (Hernández-Shancho et al, 
2010). This method is useful for helping to prioritize management 
options relevant to wastewater management and treatment, taking 
into account both the economic and environmental aspects. Table 
2 shows the price of water, and the average shadow prices for the 
The use of economic valuation as a tool for prioritizing investment
five undesirable outputs of wastewater treatment. The negative 
value reflects the environmental value of damage avoided, or in 
other words, environmental benefit. Here, for example, action to 
reduce phosphorus levels would have the greatest environmental 
benefit per unit volume, followed by nitrogen (Jenkins et al, in 
press). The overall environmental benefit resulting from the treat-
ment of wastewater can be shown in the volume removed per 
year and its shadow price (Table 3) (Jenkins et al, in press).
The greatest environmental benefit is associated with the removal of 
nitrogen because it represents nearly 60 per cent of the total profit. 
The next most important factor is phosphorus with a percentage 
weight of 30 per cent. It is important to note that the removal of 
these nutrients creates most of the environmental benefit (90 per 
cent) resulting from the treatment process. This is because these 
pollutants have the highest shadow prices. Even though large vol-
umes of suspended solids are removed from wastewater during 
treatment, their low shadow price means that their removal contrib-
utes a very low percentage (0.3 per cent) of the total environmental 
benefit. The share of the environmental benefit accounted for by or-
ganic matter (COD and BOD) is only 9.7 per cent because, despite 
the fact that a great deal is removed during the treatment process, 
their shadow prices are comparatively low (Jenkins et al, in press).
Table 2: Reference price of water treated (€/m
3
) and shadow prices for undesirable outputs (€/kg). (Jenkins et al, in press)
Table 3: Environmental benefit of treatment in €/year and €/m3 (Jenkins et al, in press)
Destination 
River
Sea
Wetlands
Reuse
Pollutants 
N
P
SS
DOB
COD
Total
Pollutant removal
(kg/year)
4,287,717
917,895
60,444,987
59,635,275
113,510,321
Environmental value
pollution (€/year)
98,133,996
50,034,733
448,098
2,690,421
13,364,429
164,671,677
Environmental value
pollution (€/m3)
0.481
0.245
0.002
0.013
0.066
0.807
%
59.6
30.4
0.3
1.6
8.1
100.0
Shadow prices for undesirable outputs (€/kg)
Reference price water €/m
3
0.7
0.1
0.9
1.5
N
− 16.353
− 4.612
− 65.209
− 26.182
P
− 30.944
− 7.533
− 103.424
− 79.268
SS
− 0.005
− 0.001
− 0.010
− 0.010
BOD
− 0.033
− 0.005
− 0.117
− 0.058
COD
− 0.098
− 0.010
− 0.122
− 0.140
Delete blank pages in pdf online - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page pdf acrobat reader; acrobat export pages from pdf
Delete blank pages in pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete a page from a pdf reader; delete pages of pdf reader
62
POLICIES AND INSTRUMENTS – MIXING 
POLICY COCKTAILS
To succeed in the face of some of the largest threats to environ-
mental degradation, human health, and productivity, it is not 
sufficient to address only urban contamination or wastewater, 
we also need to consider water supply. Governance frameworks 
should clarify and link the roles of central and local authori-
ties and communities, including rural areas and industry; pro-
mote public responsibility; and where appropriate, facilitate 
private investment and involvement in wastewater processes, 
particularly with regard to  operational  quality, maintenance 
and upgrading. The use of environmentally sound technolo-
gies including green technologies and ecosystem management 
should be used more actively and encouraged, particularly in 
rural areas, both with regard to water supply and wastewater 
production and management.
Wastewater management must address not only urban but also 
rural water management throughout the watershed and into 
the coastal zone. It must also look to the future and be able to 
meet the needs of a growing population under changing cli-
matic conditions. Meeting these challenges requires long term, 
coordinated and integrated national plans and organization as 
this cannot be dealt with alone by municipalities, individual 
sectors and rarely individual nations. It will require a much 
stronger role for good governance and an active public sector 
working across sectors and perhaps international boundaries 
to solve these challenges drawing on a range, or cocktail of pos-
sible strategies, policies and instruments.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in
delete pages from pdf acrobat reader; reader extract pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET
delete blank pages in pdf; delete page from pdf file
63
THE ROLE OF PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN THE PRIVATE 
AND PUBLIC SECTORS IN SANITATION AND WASTE-
WATER MANAGEMENT
Governments facing challenges of water and wastewater man-
agement are always confronted by the issue of attracting in-
vestments and the need to achieve broad public and national 
benefits with improved water management.
Water privatization is the outsourcing of central public wa-
ter management services and responsibilities to the private 
sector, such as in drinking water or wastewater management. 
Privatization can range from management contracts, lease 
contracts to direct concessions, in which the latter gains re-
sponsibility for the entire water system, or even asset sale, 
where the government actually sells the entire water rights. 
Because these water services are often viewed as a key public 
service and human right, privatization is often met with heavy 
resistance. The Cochabamba Water Wars are an example of 
a series of protests that took place in Cochabamba, Bolivia’s 
third largest city, between January and April 2000, when the 
municipal water supply was privatized, due to fears of in-
creased prices (Laurie, 2005). 
Currently at least 84 per cent of all water and sanitation sys-
tems are publicly owned and managed, with more than 93 per 
cent in some developing countries (World Bank, 2009). Only 
an estimated seven per cent of the urban population in the de-
veloping world is served by private companies (World Bank, 
2009). While the population served by privatized water utilities 
increased from six million to 94 million in developing or tran-
sition countries from 1991 to 2000, and the number of coun-
tries involved in such schemes from four to 38, the outsourcing 
of water management to private contractors has decreased in 
the last decade (World Bank, 2009). 
There are many cases where privatization has led to improved 
water services by generating cheaper loans and higher invest-
ments, while bringing in expertise. However, it is also clear that 
unless the process is guided and under the close supervision of 
government agencies there is a risk that the wider public inter-
est will not be served and only wealthy customers will receive 
services. Impoverished  communities are  unlikely  to be the 
primary target for companies operating under a cost-benefit 
investment-return scheme. 
Following a move to privatization in the 1990s, there has 
been a high return of wastewater services from private back to 
public management (World Bank, 2009). The critical factor 
seems to be how far privatization goes, with full control or 
concessions to private companies proving the most contro-
versial. Whilst experience has shown that privatizing water 
management as a means to gain more investments rarely re-
sults in positive results, the private sector has demonstrated 
improvements in operational efficiency and service quality. 
Hence, rather than outsourcing management, integrated part-
nership models where the private sector is given responsibil-
ity not for the full water management, but mainly for certain 
operational segments, can work best.
USE OF ECONOMIC POLICY INSTRUMENTS
Economic development is an important factor in environmen-
tal quality (Lee et al, 2010). As countries develop their econo-
mies, their citizens obtain higher living standards, yet during 
this process of economic development and industrialization, 
levels of pollution increase to a point at which citizens begin 
to demand a higher environmental quality – when measures 
come in to manage the polluting waste products of many goods 
(Lee et al, 2010). The construction and operation of waste 
Multinational companies dominate the private water, energy 
and waste management business, many of which have a close 
relationship to the public sector. Two French multinationals – 
Suez and Vivendi – control 70 per cent of the world’s privatized 
water concessions, with an Anglo-German company, RWE-
Thames, a distant third. (Hall, 2002), and the five largest oper-
ating some 80 per cent of all the privatized water concessions 
(World Bank, 2009). The same companies dominate the waste 
business – Suez and Vivendi are the largest two waste man-
agement multinationals in the world, having bought up the 
overseas operations of the former USA global giants, Waste 
Management Inc and BFI. RWE is number three in Europe 
(Davies, 2001). Many multinationals have changed  names 
or merged with one another. In 2007 Veolia Environment (ex-
Vivendi) reported US$47 billion revenue with a workforce of 
about 300 000 people (MSE, 2010).
The role of multinational corporations in 
wastewater management
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Able to download free trial and use online example source code in C# output.pdf"; // Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages PDFDocument doc
delete page on pdf document; add and delete pages in pdf
C# Word - Insert Blank Word Page in C#.NET
Users to Insert (Empty) Word Page or Pages from a to specify where they want to insert (blank) Word document rotate Word document page, how to delete Word page
delete pdf page acrobat; delete pages out of a pdf file
64
policy instruments, in particular that they tend to require a 
high level of institutional capacity (Russell and Powell, 1996), 
other challenges include administration, politics, inconsisten-
cies, need for enforcement of legislation and flaws in design  
(O’Connor, 1998).
ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT AND WASTEWATER
Ecosystem-based management is an integrated approach to 
management that considers the entire ecosystem, including  
treatment facilities, including those for wastewater requires 
a huge amount of capital – acting as a barrier to wastewater 
management in many regions. Creative solutions are required 
to finance management over the long term (Rammont and Nu-
rul Amin, 2009). Economic Instruments (EI) are tools which 
can be used to support regulatory frameworks by recovering 
some of these costs. They generate market-conforming in-
centives, both positive and negative, that are directed to bring 
about behavioural change (Rammont and Nurul Amin, 2009). 
There  are  challenges  in  the  implementation  of  economic 
Following a period of economic growth and environmental deg-
radation in 1987–96, Thailand started to give priority to envi-
ronmental issues in the early 1990s when increased economic 
performance allowed for environmental protection and man-
agement. In 1992 Thailand reinvigorated its environmental acts 
of 1975 and 1978 as the Enhancement and Conservation of the 
Environmental Quality Act (NEQA 1992), which featured the im-
plementation of two Economic Instruments – the polluter-pays 
principle (PPP) and the establishment of an Environmental Fund 
(EF) (Rammon and Nurul Amin, 2009).
Thailand focused on the use of EIs for central wastewater man-
agement. Capital investment for basic infrastructure was man-
aged by central government (Ministry of Natural Resources and 
Environment). Once constructed, responsibility was handed over 
to local government for operation and management. In 1999 the 
government established the Determining Plans and Process of 
Decentralization to Local Government Organization Act. Local 
government organizations were then handed responsibility for 
environmental management, including wastewater management 
– guided by the National Economic and Social Development 
Plan which focuses on improving water quality, reducing water 
pollution, applying the PPP and promoting the involvement of 
the private sector in water pollution management. However due 
to the high costs in dispensing this responsibility, LGOs needed 
the continuing support of central government.
This support was provided through two main channels: (1) bud-
getary allocation, and (2) grants and soft loans through the En-
vironmental Fund. This fund provides financial support for both 
government and the private sector for provision of control, reme-
dial and disposal systems, and to support the implementation of 
Challenges of applying economic instruments to finance wastewater management in Thailand
activities on enhancement and conservation of environmental 
quality. Fees collected under the PPP contribute to the EF. Au-
thority for making the charges under the PPP also falls to the 
local government authorities.
Rammon and Nurul Amin, 2009 identified a number of chal-
lenges to the uptake of these EIs in Thailand:
Failure to follow up with concrete laws and regulations to sup-
port charge implementation
Lack of willingness by local authorities to charge under the PPP.
Lack of cooperation between water and wastewater authori-
ties (water supply is administrated by two centralized authori-
ties; wastewater under local governments as part of their mis-
sion to provide environmental management).
Willingness of local government to charge and residents’ ac-
ceptance to pay.
Complexities in accessing the EF: long process of approval, 
lack of active public relations, lack of contributory fund, per-
sonnel problems and loopholes in the law and regulations are 
commonly cited problems related to accessing the EF 
Within Thailand, different cities and districts have different 
waste management approaches.
Thailand’s two-pronged strategy of providing financial support 
from EF and levying charges to implement the PPP for use of 
EIs in WWM is far from being a success. Even if the subsidy part 
of the strategy works, the PPP part does not. The confusion be-
tween willingness to pay and willingness to charge has resulted 
in a deterioration in water quality. It is suggested that greater ef-
forts to explain the benefits of wastewater management to local 
populations would result in greater acceptance to pay charges, 
and therefore make it easier for local authorities to ask.
C# PowerPoint - Insert Blank PowerPoint Page in C#.NET
to Insert (Empty) PowerPoint Page or Pages from a where they want to insert (blank) PowerPoint document PowerPoint document page, how to delete PowerPoint page
delete page pdf file; delete pages from a pdf online
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page instance may consist of newly created blank pages or image VB.NET: Edit and Manipulate PDF Pages.
delete page from pdf; delete pages of pdf
65
Farmers are able to earn nitrogen-reduction credits when they 
go beyond legal obligations to remove nitrates from the water-
shed. These credits can then be traded. This can be achieved 
by changing fertilizer application rates; by changing produc-
tion practices; by growing different crops, or retiring cropland. 
(Restoring wetlands is not yet included as a mitigation option 
because, it has been demonstrated (Ribaudo et al, 2001) that 
wetlands restoration is currently more expensive than fertil-
izer management and therefore a less attractive alternative for 
farmers, Jenkins et al, in press).
Although  there  are  more  than  40  nutrient  trading  pro-
grammes on the books in the United States as well as the de-
velopment of online tools such as the Nitrogen Trading Tool 
(http://199.133.175.80/nttwebax/), very few trades have taken 
place to date (Ribaudo et al, 2008). As such, the market value 
under existing markets is essentially zero for N mitigation. Nev-
ertheless, there is some interest in nutrient trading and it is pos-
sible that nitrogen mitigation will gain a market value in the fu-
ture. One estimate puts the annualized potential market value at 
US$624/ha/year for nitrogen mitigation (Jenkins et al, in press).
Nutrient credit trading
humans. The goal of ecosystem-based management is to main-
tain an ecosystem in a healthy, productive and resilient condi-
tion so that it can provide the services humans want and need. 
Ecosystem-based management differs from current approaches 
that usually focus on a single species, sector, activity or concern; 
it considers the cumulative impacts of different sectors. Specifi-
cally, ecosystem-based management emphasizes the protection 
of ecosystem structure, functioning, and key processes. It is 
place-based, focusing on a specific ecosystem and the range of 
activities affecting it. Ecosystem-based management explicitly 
accounts for the interconnectedness within systems, recogniz-
ing the importance of interactions between many target species 
or key services and other non-target species. It acknowledges 
interconnectedness between systems, such as air, land and 
sea, and it integrates ecological, social, economic, and institu-
tional perspectives, recognizing their strong interdependences 
(COMPASS, 2005). 
Tackling the  broad and  cross-sectoral  nature of  wastewater 
and its management successfully and sustainably requires an 
ecosystem-based perspective, applied to integrated natural re-
source management approaches. To those working in water 
management, the concept of Integrated Water Resource Man-
agement (IWRM) is familiar. To those working in the marine 
environment, it would be Integrated Coastal Zone Manage-
ment (ICZM), or a variant of this. There is a need for the bridg-
ing of these communities to ensure that the entire water sup-
ply chain and wastewater impact can be addressed coherently. 
These approaches are based on natural ecological boundaries 
and have strong merit. However, it is very much an ideologi-
cal construct as often political and administrative boundaries 
do not align, and this makes implementation and governance 
challenging. Additional challenges are social  pressures and 
power over the management and interests of water resources 
and usage (Molle, 2009).
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Free trial and use online source code are available for RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" ' Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages Dim doc As
copy pages from pdf into new pdf; cut pages out of pdf
VB.NET PDF: Get Started with PDF Library
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" ' Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages Dim doc
delete blank pages in pdf online; delete page on pdf
66
Pesticides  used  in  agriculture,  public  health,  industrial, 
veterinary and domestic use can potentially end up in the 
water, either through seepage into groundwater, run-off into 
streams or via the municipal wastewater collection systems. 
On their way they often threaten human and environmen-
tal health. Balancing the desired benefits of pesticide use, 
whilst minimizing the potentially harmful side effects of 
these potent chemicals primarily remains the responsibility 
of governments.
Sri Lanka’s high yielding crop varieties, such as tea and rice, 
are susceptible to pest damage, resulting in a need for safe 
and effective pest control. Sri Lanka has prohibited a large 
number of highly toxic chemicals without affecting its agri-
cultural production and today produces one of the world’s 
cleanest teas with regards to all persistent organic pollutants 
(POPs) and WHO hazard class Ia and Ib chemicals. How was 
this achieved?
The Office of the Registrar of Pesticides, established within 
the Department of Agriculture looks at product registration, 
provides laboratory analysis for monitoring programmes 
and coordinates enforcement of the Control of Pesticides 
Act No 33 of 1980, guided by a multi-disciplinary and multi-
sectoral Technical Advisory Committee. One of the keys to 
pesticide management is chemicals registration. Prerequi-
sites are the conformation to international standards such 
as those of FAO and WHO; and the registration status in 
other countries. The Rotterdam Convention is one of the 
key international instruments providing governments with 
guidelines and detailed information on product use and 
risk profiles.
The adoption of international standards and cooperation is 
cost-effective in countries with limited financial and labora-
tory capacity. Some challenges remain, but given that most 
of Sri Lanka’s pesticide control only started a little over two 
decades ago, the progress that has been made thanks to the 
institutional  arrangements,  legislation,  and  enforcement, 
has been remarkable.
(Source: Manuweera, 2007; Manuweera et al, 2008)
Pesticide management in Sri Lanka
APPROPRIATE TECHNOLOGY AND 
INNOVATION
There are numerous examples where attempts to transfer tech-
nologies from one place to another fails. Different approaches 
to wastewater management are required for different regions, 
rural and urban areas, with different population sizes and dif-
ferent stages of economic governance depending on capacity to 
manage wastewater and capacity for governance. Approaches 
can also vary depending on the quality standard required for 
end users or end-point disposal. The sanitation ladder provides 
a useful instrument to assess the local status of sanitation in a 
community, municipality or region, pointing to optimal waste-
water management strategies.
The cradle-to-cradle philosophy suggests a new form of pro-
duction using processes that rely on reusable, biodegradable 
or consumable materials. No waste, as we know it at all and in 
fact the possibility of using production methods to improve the 
environment, for example water going out cleaner than it came 
in. With cradle-to-cradle there is no end, as discarded products 
once they have served their purpose should provide food for 
the biosphere or be completely recyclable in the technosphere. 
Examples include carpets that are made of a polymer that is 
completely recyclable – it can be depolymerized and used again 
and again or textiles that are made from completely non-toxic 
material, tested down to parts per million, that are completely 
biodegradable and nutritious for the environment.
Why is it currently acceptable, even in developed countries with 
environmental guidelines, for manufactures and consumers to 
demand products whose production and or disposal damage 
the environment? We tolerate products that are inherently poi-
sonous, are poisonous to make and have a toxic legacy. We need 
international regulations to drive innovation so that cradle-to-
cradle becomes the norm. Companies are now starting to adopt 
cradle-to-cradle production and finding that it is economic to 
have design principles, that are “good” rather than “less bad”.
(Source: McDonough and Braungart, 2002)
Cradle-to-cradle – can we do away with 
wastewater?
How to C#: Cleanup Images
returned. Delete Blank Pages. Set property BlankPageDelete to true , blank pages in the document will be deleted. Remove Edges or Borders.
acrobat remove pages from pdf; delete page pdf file reader
67
On the Coral Coast of Fiji it was estimated that 35–40 per cent of the 
anthropogenic nutrients entering the fringing reefs resulted from 
local pig-rearing. The nearby tourist hotels give leftover food to 
workers for their pigs, which encourages people to keep pigs. Pigs 
produce three times as much nitrogen waste per unit weight com-
pared to humans and many of the pig pens are near or over water. 
Luckily the community found a simple low-cost system to manage 
pig waste and reduce contamination of the surrounding reefs.
The technique of using sawdust beds to assimilate and stabilize 
piggery wastes is generally known as shallow bed composting. 
This technique has the potential to offer pig farmers some real 
advantages in both economic and waste management terms. For 
example, the capital and maintenance costs of this system are 
significantly lower than the original piggery. Additionally, as liquid 
Reducing wastewater impacts in the Coral Coast, Fiji
waste from washing pens is eliminated, the waste management of 
the unit is dramatically simplified. 
The sawdust must be raked and renewed weekly and kept dry. It is 
replaced and taken to the farm about every three months to fertil-
ize crops. With good management of these systems foul odours 
are not a problem, with the final composted product having an 
earthy smell. The system was initially trialled at one piggery at the 
National Youth Training Centre in the Sigatoka valley. The man-
ager noted bigger, healthier pigs in the sawdust pens and has since 
applied this in all the centre’s piggeries. If sawdust is not readily 
available other high-carbon, high-absorptive material can be tried.
(Source: UNEP/GPA  and  UNESCO-IHE, http://www.training.gpa.unep.
org/content.html?id=199&ln=6)
68
It is important that management approaches form part of 
the planning and development process, reflecting regional 
realities and cultural differences as well as externalities 
such as exposure to natural hazards or extreme conditions. 
Incremental approaches to wastewater management can 
contribute to long-term success. 
Innovation is important to continue to address evolving 
challenges in a changing world – to reduce the energy de-
mands of wastewater management, and encourage solu-
tions that promote using raw materials that do not con-
taminate, rather than focusing on end of pipe solutions.
THE ROLE OF EDUCATION, AWARENESS 
AND STEWARDSHIP
Wastewater is everyone’s concern in the home and at work 
and using education to help change behaviour to both re-
duce wastewater discharge and also see the opportunities 
of managing wastewater is part of the solution. Increased 
understanding of the links between wastewater and health, 
ecosystem functioning and the potential benefits of waste-
water reuse in contributing to development and improved 
wellbeing can increase uptake of initiatives. 
It is vital that education in wastewater management and 
engagement of stakeholders in all sectors should include 
access to solutions and be culturally specific. Education, 
awareness, advocacy and stewardship should be addressed 
at multiple levels, including the development of profes-
sional skills for improved inter-sectoral collaboration and 
multi-year financial planning.
As an internationally famous tourist destination, protecting the 
environment, maintaining natural beauty, and conserving the nat-
ural resources of the area are consistent priorities in Bali. Faced 
with the threats of environmental pollution and deterioration that 
comes with rapid tourist development, the government and vari-
ous stakeholders have recognized the critical importance of waste-
water treatment and sanitation for the sustainability of Bali.
This was a key consideration in the development of the  300-hect-
are Nusa Dua Tourist Resort, which has integrated a wastewater 
treatment system that not only treats wastewater from the hotels 
and other establishments in the area, but also provides water for 
maintaining hotel gardens, public gardens and the golf course. 
The system was also designed to blend with the natural physical 
surroundings and socio-cultural setting of Nusa Dua. The final 
wastewater station, called the Eco Lagoon, attracts various species 
of birds and further adds to the charm of the area. The wastewater 
treatment system is operated by the Bali Tourism Development 
Corporation  in local government,  hotels, and commercial  and 
tourism establishments.
In Denpasar City, one of the focal areas for coastal recreation and 
tourism in Bali, the three-phase Denpasar Sewerage Development 
Project (DSDP) is now on its second phase. The first phase of the 
project completed a sewerage treatment system with a capacity of 
51 000 m
3
a day, which currently serves around 9 000 homes in 
Denpasar. The second phase of the project will expand the treat-
ment facility to the other areas in Denpasar all the way to the Sanur 
area, with additional pipe connections to 8 000 homes. The proj-
ect is a collaboration between the Government of the Republic of 
Indonesia, Bali Province, Denpasar City, Badung Regency and the 
Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC).
For areas that could not be served by the centralized sewerage sys-
tem, a community sanitation programme called Santasi oleh Ma-
syarakat, or SANIMAS, which involves construction of community 
wastewater treatment systems with a capacity of 60 m3 a day has 
also been implemented in Denpasar City and other areas in Bali. 
The system was set up through a multi-financing scheme with con-
tributions from central and local government and the beneficiary 
community. Ecological and low-cost wastewater gardens have also 
been developed in various areas in Bali.
(Source: Personal communication, Adrian Ross, PEMSEA; 2010)
No one size fits all – wastewater treatment in Bali
69
The Rhine is Western Europe’s largest river basin and one of 
the world’s most important trans-boundary waterways, flow-
ing 1 320 km through Switzerland, Austria, Germany, France, 
Luxembourg and the Netherlands. Established as a navigable 
river in 1816, the Rhine has seen several major engineering 
projects proceed without prior bilateral agreement or environ-
mental concern. The river became the “sewer of Europe” in the 
mid 1900s when large amounts of liquid waste from towns, 
industry and agriculture were increasingly discharged into the 
river. Salmon and most other fish species vanished, phospho-
rus reached alarming levels and it had become difficult to draw 
drinkable water from the river.
The need to set up a basin-wide body to deal with pollution 
issues in the Rhine became clear, leading to the formation of 
the International Commission for the Protection of the Rhine 
(ICPR) in 1950. However, it took another 20 years to see signif-
icant results, partly due to the loose set-up and lack of author-
ity of the commission. The final catalyst came in 1987, when 
an accident at a Basel chemical plant led to the discharge of 
tonnes of toxins into the river, an environmental disaster caus-
ing the deaths of more than half a million fish. 
After the 1987 accident, environmental awareness rose and 
the affected population and their representatives demanded 
much tougher measures against polluters. The 15-year Rhine 
Action Plan – also known as Salmon 2000 – was adopted as 
a result, one of its goals being the return of salmon and other 
fish by the end of the century. With an active water-quality 
monitoring regime, the plan also deployed pollution patrols 
to  industry  and communities, penalties  for polluters  and 
flood control and bank restoration measures.
Since 1987 point discharges of hazardous substances have de-
creased by 70 to 100 per cent, the fauna has almost completely 
recovered, including salmon, and accidental toxic discharges 
have been greatly reduced. However, several challenges remain, 
including fish passages, the release of toxic mud from the port 
of Rotterdam and pollution from farm fertilizers. On comple-
tion of the Rhine Action Plan, the Rhine 2020 Plan was adopted 
in 2001 for further sustainable development of the river.
(Sources: UNEP/DEWA/GRID-Europe, 2004; ICPR, 2010; UNESCO, 2000)
Political and public support for change – 
Salmon in the Rhine
70
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested