c# open pdf file in adobe reader : Cut pages from pdf reader software application project winforms html azure UWP SickWater_screen7-part17

71
The Iraqi marshlands are the most extensive wetland ecosystem 
in the Middle East and Western Eurasia. The marshlands of the Ti-
gris and Euphrates delta are spawning grounds for Gulf fisheries 
and home to a wide variety of bird species. By 2002 the 9 000 km
2
of permanent wetlands had dwindled to just 760 km2, drained by 
the former Iraqi regime and contaminated by sewage and chemi-
cal waste. With poor water circulation and low flows, salinity had 
also increased. The weak management sent the marshes into se-
rious decline, and this impacted the surrounding communities. 
UNEP´s Iraqi Marshlands project is contributing to restoration 
and sustainable management of the area, through the identifica-
Building capacity and stewardship for environmental management of the Iraqi marshlands
The UNEP/WHO/UN-HABITAT/WSSCC Guidelines on Munici-
pal Wastewater Management propose sustainable wastewater 
management based on an approach that integrates water sup-
ply, sanitation, and wastewater treatment. http://www.training.
gpa.unep.org/documents/guidelines_on_municipal_wastewa-
ter_english.pdf
These guidelines also reflect needs for capacity development in 
this field and in response to these needs, UNEP/GPA jointly with 
the UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education and in the frame-
work  of  the  UN/DOALOS  Train-Sea-Coast  Programme  offer 
training courses on wastewater management to municipal staff. 
The Train Sea-Coast programme trained 1 800 experts from 67 
countries between 2003 and 2009. It aims to increase the ability 
of participants to identify and formulate sustainable and finan-
cially viable proposals for the restoration of existing municipal in-
frastructure. It also develops capacities for new projects to either 
collect and treat wastewater, or to use alternative technologies to 
reduce or recycle nutrients from human waste. 
Post-training  evaluation  for 2007–9, demonstrated that  the 
UNEP-UNESCO-IHE  training  programme  was delivering  re-
sults, providing participants with knowledge and skills that they 
UNEP’s response to capacity building needs in developing countries
were able to apply in their work. It identified a further training 
need for senior management and high level policy makers of 
municipalities and utilities providers of wastewater manage-
ment services.
The evaluation also identified areas of the course that can be 
strengthened. There are few practical examples and little data 
on wastewater management solutions that have been imple-
mented locally under the guidance of the course materials. It 
was proposed that UNEP/GPA and its partners embark on a 
new phase of the programme to link institutional capacity build-
ing with demonstration projects, which should be documented 
and shared. In addition, the lack of multi-year financial planning 
for municipal infrastructure projects in many countries severely 
undermines, and sometimes even prevents, the operation and 
maintenance of already existing infrastructure, such as sewerage 
systems and treatment plants. The capacity building needs of 
lifecycle budgeting processes have not yet been met.
More information about the UNEP wastewater management 
training  programme  is  available at: http://www.training.gpa.
unep.org, it is supported by the governments of Belgium, Ireland 
the Netherlands and the United States, the European Union ACP 
Water Facility and UNDP-GEF.
tion and implementation of suitable mitigation options, particu-
larly for provision of safe drinking water, but also for sanitation 
systems and water quality management. Implemented by the 
International Environmental Technology Centre, the Marshlands 
project includes  training of Iraqi partners,  coordination  with 
Iraqi and other stakeholders, communication and data sharing 
through the Arabic-English Marshlands Information Network, 
and pilot projects to introduce environmentally sound technolo-
gies for safe water and sanitation to marshlands communities.
(Source UNEP and UNESCO: http://marshlands.unep.or.jp/)
Cut pages from pdf reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pdf page acrobat; delete page in pdf reader
Cut pages from pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
copy pages from pdf to new pdf; delete blank pages from pdf file
72
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
delete page in pdf preview; delete page pdf file
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
C:\test1.pdf") Dim pdf2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\test2.pdf") Dim pageindexes = New Integer() {1, 2, 4} Dim pages = pdf.DuplicatePage(pageindexes
delete pages in pdf; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
73
PART III
POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS
TACKLE IMMEDIATE CONSEQUENCES
On its journey through the hydrological cycle, water is used and 
reused an infinite number of times by various industries, com-
munities and ecosystems. With 70–90 per cent of the water 
being used and some 50 per cent of the nutrient loading added 
before water even enters urban areas, wastewater management 
must address not only urban but also rural water management 
through improved forestry, agriculture and ecosystem manage-
ment. This requires national plans and organization as it can-
not be dealt with solely by municipalities or single ministries.
Eventually water reaches the  coastal  plains, estuaries, ports 
and harbors where communities, agriculture and industry are 
burgeoning. More wastewater is generated and finally it is dis-
charged to the sea, frequently with little or no treatment, con-
taminating seafood, polluting critical ecosystems and threaten-
ing biodiversity. Wastewater management should reflect the 
community and ecological needs of each downstream ecosys-
tem and user. Improved ecosystem management, including 
integrated forestry, livestock, agriculture, wetland and riparian 
management, will reduce and mitigate the effects of wastewa-
ter entering rivers, lakes and coastal environments. The best 
option is to close the nutrient loop and harness the potential of 
wastewater for re-use in agriculture, or to generate biogas, thus 
turning the nutrients contained therein into resources.
To succeed in the face of some of the largest threats to human 
health, productivity and environmental degradation, it is not 
sufficient to address only one source of contamination. Gover-
nance frameworks should clarify and link the roles of central 
and local authorities and communities, including rural areas; 
promote public responsibility; and where appropriate, facilitate 
private  investment and involvement  in wastewater  manage-
ment. The use of technology in wastewater management should 
also be multi-faceted and should reflect the needs and capacity 
of local communities. Incentives should encourage innovative, 
adaptable approaches to reduce the production of wastewater 
and potency of its contaminants. The use of green technologies 
and ecosystem management practices should be used more ac-
tively and encouraged, including in rural areas with regard to 
both water supply and wastewater management.
Whilst experience has shown that privatizing water manage-
ment as a means to gain more investments rarely results in 
positive results, the private sector has demonstrated improve-
ments  in  operational  efficiency  and  service  quality.  Hence, 
rather than outsourcing management, integrated partnership 
models where the private sector is given responsibility not for 
the full water management, but mainly for certain operational 
segments, can work best
Countries must adopt a multi-sectoral approach 
to wastewater management as a matter of ur-
gency,  incorporating  principles  of  ecosystem-
based management from the watersheds into the sea, 
connecting  sectors  that  will  reap  immediate  benefits 
from better wastewater management.
Successful and sustainable management of waste-
water requires a cocktail of innovative approaches 
that engage the public and private sector at local, 
national  and  transboundary  scales.  Planning  processes 
should provide an enabling environment for innovation, 
including at the community level.
1
2
A
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
Copy, paste and cut PDF image while preview without adobe reader component installed. Image resize function allows VB.NET users to zoom and crop image.
delete pages on pdf; delete a page in a pdf file
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
C#.NET PDF SDK - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in C#.NET. C#.NET Demo Code: Cut Image in PDF Page in C#.NET. PDF image cutting is similar to image deleting.
delete pages pdf; reader extract pages from pdf
74
Wastewater  management  and  urban  planning  lag  far  be-
hind advancing population growth, urbanization and climate 
change. With forward thinking, and innovative planning, ef-
fective wastewater management can contribute to the chal-
lenges of water scarcity while building ecosystem resilience, 
thus enabling ecosystem-based adaptation and increased op-
portunities for solutions to the challenges of current global-
change scenarios.
Population growth and climate change are not uniform in 
time or space, and so regionally specific planning is essential. 
Wastewater management must be integrated as part of the so-
lution in existing agreements and actions.
In  light  of  rapid  global  change,  communities 
should plan wastewater management against fu-
ture scenarios, not current situations.
4
THINKING TO THE LONG TERM
B
Investment, including ODA, in wastewater infrastructure must 
reflect the full lifecycle of the facility, not just capital project 
costs. This should not just be about new financing, but also 
making current investments more effective and sustainable. 
Full life-cycle financing may involve linking the cost of waste-
water treatment with water supply – while many contend that 
access to safe water is a human right, the act of polluting water 
is not, and water users should bear the cost of returning water 
at a quality as close as possible to its natural state.
The valuation of non-market dividends, e.g. public amenity, eco-
system services such as carbon sequestration, nutrient and waste 
assimilation, must be further developed to enable more compre-
hensive cost benefit analysis of the potential returns from waste-
water management and for the development of effective market 
based incentives, such as pollution cap and trade schemes.
Innovative  financing  of  appropriate  wastewater
infrastructure  should  incorporate  design,  con-
struction,  operation,  maintenance,  upgrading
and/or decommissioning. Financing should take account 
of the fact that there are important livelihood opportunities 
in improving wastewater treatment processes.
3
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
acrobat extract pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf preview
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
doc2.Save(outPutFilePath); Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using C#. Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in C#.NET.
delete pages on pdf online; delete a page from a pdf acrobat
75
Different approaches to wastewater management are required 
for different areas, rural and urban, with different population 
sizes, levels of economic development, technical capacity and 
systems of governance. Approaches can also vary depending 
on the quality standard required for end users or end point 
disposal. The sanitation ladder provides a useful instrument 
to assess the local status of sanitation in a community, mu-
nicipality or region, pointing to optimal wastewater manage-
ment strategies.
It is important that wastewater management approaches form 
part of the planning and development process, reflecting re-
gional realities and cultural differences as well as externalities 
such as exposure to natural hazards or extreme conditions. 
Incremental approaches to wastewater management can con-
tribute to long-term success.
Wastewater is everyone’s concern in the home and at work. 
Education  and  awareness  can  influence  behaviours  to  re-
duce wastewater discharge and also to see the opportunities 
of managing wastewater in an environmentally friendly and 
financially sustainable way as part of the solution. Increased 
understanding of the links between wastewater and health, 
ecosystem functioning, food production and the potential ben-
efits of wastewater reuse in contributing to development and 
improved wellbeing can increase uptake of initiatives.
It is vital that education and training in wastewater manage-
ment and systematic engagement of stakeholders in all sectors 
throughout the entire project cycle is culturally specific and 
exemplifies or suggests solutions that can be modified to suit 
different settings. Education, awareness, advocacy and stew-
ardship should be addressed at multiple levels, including the 
development of professional skills for improved inter-sectoral 
collaboration and multi-year financial planning.
Solutions  for  smart  wastewater  management 
must be socially and culturally appropriate, as 
well as economically and environmentally viable
into the future.
Education and awareness must play a central role 
in wastewater management and in reducing over-
all volumes and harmful content of wastewater
produced, so that solutions are sustainable. 
5
6
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET Able to cut and paste image into another PDF PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader component.
delete pages from pdf acrobat; delete page on pdf
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
example, you may easily create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s
delete blank page in pdf online; pdf delete page
76
Aquifer
Huge storehouses of water comprising the saturated zone be-
neath the water table (USGS 2009 http://ga.water.usgs.gov/
edu/earthgwaquifer.html) 
Carbon sequestration
The removal of atmospheric carbon dioxide, either through 
biological processes (for example, photosynthesis in plants and 
trees), or geological processes (for example, storage of carbon 
dioxide in underground reservoirs) (Department of Climate 
Change 2008)
Dead zone
Hypoxic (low-oxygen) areas  in the  world’s  oceans  (Science 
Daily  undated  http://www.sciencedaily.com/articles/d/dead_
zone_(ecology).htm )
Desalination
Any mechanical procedure or process where some or all of the 
salt is removed from water (EMWIS 2010 http://www.semide.
net/portal_thesaurus/search_html) 
Downstream ecosystem
Ecosystem of a lower watercourse (WaterWiki 2009 http://wa-
terwiki.net/index.php/Downstream_ecosystem) 
Economic instruments
Fiscal and other economic incentives and disincentives to in-
corporate environmental costs and benefits into the budgets 
of households and enterprises. The objective is to encourage 
environmentally sound and efficient production and consump-
tion through full-cost pricing. Economic instruments include 
effluent taxes or charges on pollutants and waste, deposit-re-
fund systems and tradable pollution permits (United Nations 
Statistics Division 2006 http://unstats.un.org/unsd/environ-
mentgl/gesform.asp?getitem=738)
Economic valuation
The assessment, evaluation, or appraisal of business perfor-
mance  in  matters  involving  ecology  and  finances  (Oxford 
English  Dictionary,  quoted  in  KPV  http://kpv.arso.gov.si/
kpv/Gemet_search/Gemet_report/report_gemet_term?ID_
CONCEPT=2938&L1=94&L2=94) 
Ecosystem-based management
An integrative and holistic approach to management based on the 
idea of systems in contrast to the traditional procedure of manag-
ing sectoral activities like fishing, shipping, or oil and gas devel-
opment. This approach is intended not only to draw attention to 
linkages among the various components of complex systems but 
also to consider the non-linear dynamics of socio-ecological sys-
tems (Arctic Governance 2010 http://www.arcticgovernance.org/
ecosystem-based-management-ebm.4668250-142904.html) 
Ecosystem services
The processes by which the environment produces resources 
that we often take for granted such as safe water, timber, and 
habitat for fisheries, and pollination of native and agricultural 
plants (Ecological Society of America undated http://www.esa.
org/ecoservices/comm/body.comm.fact.ecos.html) 
Equity
The quality of being fair or impartial (Dictionary.com 2010 
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/equity). A core propo-
sition is that future generations have a right to an inheritance 
(capital bequest) sufficient to allow them to generate a level of 
wellbeing no less than that of the current generation (European 
Community  2005  http://biodiversity-chm.eea.europa.eu/ny-
glossary_terms/I/intergenerational_equity)
Eutrophication
A process of pollution that occurs when a lake or stream be-
comes over-rich in plant nutrient; as a consequence it becomes 
GLOSSARY
77
overgrown in algae and other aquatic plants. The plants die and 
decompose. In decomposing the plants rob the water of oxygen 
and the lake, river or stream becomes lifeless. Nitrate fertilizers 
which drain from the fields, nutrients from animal wastes and 
human sewage are the primary causes of eutrophication. They 
have high  biological oxygen demand (BOD) (EMWIS 2010 
http://www.semide.net/portal_thesaurus/search_html) 
Food security
When all people at all times have access to sufficient, safe, nu-
tritious food to maintain a healthy and active life (WHO 2010 
http://www.who.int/trade/glossary/story028/en/) 
Green city
Today, many city mayors are working to get their cities focused on 
the environmental movement. For many of those mayors, their 
goal is to convert their city into a green city. By thriving to achieve 
green city status, leaders are acting to improve the quality of the 
air, lower the use of non-renewable resources, encourage the 
building of green homes, offices, and other structures, reserve 
more green space, support environmentally-friendly methods of 
transportation, and offer recycling programmes (Wisegeek.com 
undated http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-green-city.htm) 
Green technology
 continuously  evolving  group  of  methods  and  materials, 
from techniques for generating energy to non-toxic cleaning 
products. The goals that inform developments in this rapidly 
growing field include sustainability, “cradle-to-cradle” design, 
source reduction, innovation, viability, energy, green building, 
environmentally preferred purchasing, green chemistry, and 
green nanotechnology (Green Technology 2006 http://www.
green-technology.org/what.htm) 
Groundwater
Freshwater beneath the earth’s surface (usually in aquifers) 
supplying wells and springs. Because groundwater is a major 
source of drinking water, there is a growing concern over leach-
ing of agricultural and industrial pollutants or substances from 
underground storage tanks (United Nations Statistics Division 
2006 
http://unstats.un.org/unsd/environmentgl/gesform.
asp?getitem=586) 
Irrigation
Artificial application of water to land to assist in the grow-
ing of crops and pastures. It is carried out by spraying water 
under pressure (spray irrigation) or by pumping water onto 
the land (flood irrigation) (United Nations Statistics Division 
2006 
http://unstats.un.org/unsd/environmentgl/gesform.
asp?getitem=685) 
Marine pollution
Direct or indirect introduction by humans of substances or 
energy into the marine environment (including estuaries), re-
sulting in harm to living resources, hazards to human health, 
hindrances to marine activities including fishing, impairment 
of the quality of sea water and reduction of amenities (United 
Nations Statistics Division 2006 http://unstats.un.org/unsd/
environmentgl/gesform.asp?getitem=738)
Market and non-market values
Most environmental goods and services, such as clean air 
and water, and healthy fish and wildlife populations, are not 
traded in markets. Their economic value -how much people 
would be willing to pay for them- is not revealed in market 
prices. The only option for assigning monetary values to them 
is to rely on non-market valuation methods. Without these 
value estimates, these resources may be implicitly underval-
ued and decisions regarding their use and stewardship may 
not accurately reflect their true value to society (GreenFacts 
2009  http://www.greenfacts.org/glossary/mno/non-market-
value.htm) 
78
Megacity
Massive migration out of the country and into the city has lead 
to the rise of the megacity, a term typically used to describe a 
city with a population of over 10 000 000 inhabitants (Wise-
geek.com undated http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-mega-
city.htm) 
Peri-urban
Peri-urban areas are the transition zone, or interaction zone, 
where urban and rural activities are juxtaposed, and landscape 
features are subject to rapid modifications, induced by human 
activities (Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environ-
ment  2008  http://www.icsu-scope.org/projects/cluster1/pu-
ech.htm) 
Polluter Pays Principle
Principle according to which the polluter should bear the cost 
of measures to reduce pollution according to the extent of ei-
ther the damage done to society or the exceeding of an accept-
able  level (standard) of pollution  (United Nations  Statistics 
Division  2006  http://unstats.un.org/unsd/environmentgl/
gesform.asp?getitem=902) 
Population connected  to  urban  wastewater collection 
system
Percentage of the resident population connected to the waste-
water  collecting  systems  (sewerage).  Wastewater  collecting 
systems may deliver wastewater to treatment plants or may 
discharge it without treatment to the environment (United Na-
tions Statistics Division 2009 http://unstats.un.org/unsd/EN-
VIRONMENT/wastewater.htm)
Population connected to urban wastewater treatment
Percentage of the resident population whose wastewater is 
treated at wastewater treatment plants (United Nations Sta-
tistics Division 2009 http://unstats.un.org/unsd/ENVIRON-
MENT/wastewater.htm)
Private sector
That part of an economy in which goods and services are pro-
duced by individuals and companies as opposed to the govern-
ment, which controls the public sector (Dictionary.com 2010 
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/private%20sector) 
Public sector
That part of the economy controlled by the government (Dic-
tionary.com  2010  http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/
public+sector) 
Resilience
Ecological resilience can be defined in two ways. The first is a 
measure of the magnitude of disturbance that can be absorbed 
before the (eco)system changes its structure by changing the 
variables and processes that control behaviour. The second, a 
more traditional meaning, is as a measure of resistance to dis-
turbance and the speed of return to the equilibrium state of 
an  ecosystem.  http://biodiversity-chm.eea.europa.eu/nyglos-
sary_terms/E/ecological_or_ecosystem_resilience 
Saphrogenic
Formed by putrefaction, for example by bacteria http://diction-
ary.reference.com/browse/saprogenic 
Sanitation
A range of interventions designed to reduce health hazards in 
the environment and environmental receptivity to health risks, 
including management of excreta, sewage, drainage and solid 
waste, and environmental management interventions for dis-
ease vector control.
Adapted from: http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health /
hygiene/sanhygpromotoc.pdf
Slums
Areas of older housing that are deteriorating in the sense of 
their being under-serviced, overcrowded and dilapidated (Unit-
79
ed  Nations  Statistics  Division  2006  http://unstats.un.org/
unsd/environmentgl/gesform.asp?getitem=1046) 
Tailings
Wastes separated out during the processing of crops and min-
eral ores, including residues of raw materials (United Nations 
Statistics Division 2006 http://unstats.un.org/unsd/environ-
mentgl/gesform.asp?getitem=1119) 
Transboundary
Crossing or existing across national boundaries (Encarta World 
English  Dictionary  2009  http://encarta.msn.com/diction-
ary_1861721403/transboundary.html) 
Urban wastewater collection system 
A system of conduits which collect and conduct urban waste-
water. Collecting systems are often operated by public authori-
ties or semi-public associations (United Nations Statistics Di-
vision  2009  http://unstats.un.org/unsd/ENVIRONMENT/
wastewater.htm)
Urban wastewater treatment
All treatment of wastewater in urban wastewater treatment 
plants (UWWTP’s). UWWTP’s are usually operated by public 
authorities or by private companies working by order of public 
authorities. Includes wastewater delivered to treatment plants 
by trucks (United Nations Statistics Division 2009 http://un-
stats.un.org/unsd/ENVIRONMENT/wastewater.htm)
Waste assimilation
Both forests and wetlands provide a natural buffer between hu-
man activities and water supplies, filtering out pathogens such 
as Giardia or Escherichia, nutrients such as nitrogen and phos-
phorus, as well as metals and sediments. This benefits humans 
in the form of safe drinking water, and plants and animals by 
reducing harmful algae blooms, reduction of dissolved oxygen 
and excessive sediment in water (The University of Vermont 
2004  http://ecovalue.uvm.edu/evp/modules/nz/evp_es_defi-
nitions.asp) 
Water stressed
A country is water stressed if the available freshwater supply 
relative to water withdrawals acts as an important constraint on 
development (WHO, WMO and UNEP 2003 http://www.who.
int/globalchange/publications/cchhbook/en/index.html) 
Water table
Level below which water-saturated soil is encountered. It is also 
known as groundwater surface (United Nations Statistics Di-
vision  2006  http://unstats.un.org/unsd/environmentgl/ges-
form.asp?getitem=1205) 
White elephant
Something costly to maintain; an expensive and often rare or 
valuable possession whose upkeep is a considerable financial 
burden  (Encarta World English  Dictionary  2009 http://en-
carta.msn.com/encnet/features/dictionary/DictionaryResults.
aspx?lextype=3&search=white%20elephant) 
Willingness to charge
There is growing evidence that many urban and rural communi-
ties are willing to pay more than the prevailing rates for water and 
sanitation, to ensure a better or more reliable service. However, 
governments seem unwilling to match this with a willingness to 
charge consumers for these services and the result is a continu-
ing cycle of low revenues, high costs, unsatisfactory services and 
financial crisis (UNDP-World Bank 1999 http://124.30.164.71/
asciweb/kwa/site/Content%20Resources/Financial%20As-
pects/National/Willingness%20to%20Pay%20Dehradun.pdf)
Willingness to pay
The amount an individual is willing to pay to acquire some 
good or service. This may be elicited from stated or revealed 
preference approaches (UNEP 1995)
80
AMD
BFI
BOD
COD
CREPA
DALY
DFID
DSDP
EF
EI
EU
FAO
GDP
GEF
GHG
GPA
Ha
HAPPC
ICPR
ICZM
IPCC
IWRM
JBIC
JMP
Km
2
MA
MDG
Mg
N
NPV
ODA
ONAS
P
PEMSEA
POPs
PPP
SIDS
SOPAC
SS
UN
UN CESCR
UN-HABITAT
UNDESA
UNDP
UNEP
UNESCO
UNFPA
UNGA
UNICEF
UNSGAB
USA
US$
WFD
WHO
WIO-LaB
WSP
WWAP
WWM
WWTP
XOF
Yr
ACRONYMS
Acid Mine Drainage
Browning Ferris Industries
Biological Oxygen Demand
Chemical Oxygen Demand
Le Centre Régional pour l’Eau Potable et 
l’Assainissement à faible coût
Disability-Adjusted Life Year
UK Department for International Development
Dempasar Sewerage Development Project
Euro
Environment Fund
Economic Instruments
European Union
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United 
Nations
Gross Domestic Product
Global Environment Facility
Green House Gas
Global Programme of Action for the Protection of 
the Marine Environment from Land-based Activities
Hectare
Hazard Analysis of Critical Control Points
International Commission for the Protection of 
the Rhine
Integrated Coastal Zone Management
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
Integrated Water Resource Management
Japan Bank for International Cooperation
Joint Monitoring Programme
Square Kilometres
Millennium Ecosystem Assessment 
Millennium Development Goal
Milligramme
Nitrogen
Net Present Value
Overseas Development Assistance
National Company of Sanitation
Phosphorus
Partnerships in Environmental Management 
for the Seas of East Asia
Persistent Organic Pollutants
Polluter Pays Principal
Small Island Developing States
Pacific Islands Applied Geoscience Commission
Suspended Solids
United Nations
UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cul-
tural Rights
United Nations Human Settlements Programme
United Nations Department of Economic and 
Social Affairs
United Nations Development Programme
United Nations Environment Programme
United Nations Educational, Scientific and 
Cultural Organization
United Nations Population Fund
United Nations General Assembly
United Nations Children’s Fund
UN Secretary General’s Advisory Board on 
Water and Sanitation
United States of America
US Dollar
EU Water Framework Directive
World Health Organization
Addressing Land Based Activities in the West-
ern Indian Ocean
Water and Sanitation Programme
World Water Assessment Programme
Wastewater Management
Wastewater Treatment Plant
Central African Franc
Year
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested