c# open pdf file in adobe reader : Delete pages on pdf Library application component asp.net html .net mvc smith_modern_optical_engineering5-part152

CA′ =
CA
(2.21)
Finally, the location of P′ is found by rearranging CA′ = (R - L′) sin
U′ from right triangle P′A′C into
L′ = R -
(2.22)
Thus, beginning with a ray defined by its slope angle U and its inter-
section with the axis L, we can determine the corresponding data, U′
and L′,  for  the  ray  after  refraction  by  the  surface.  Obviously,  this
process could be applied surface by surface to trace the path of a ray
through an optical system.
2.5 The Paraxial Region
The paraxial region of an optical system is a thin threadlike region
about the optical axis which is so small that all the angles made by the
rays (i.e., the slope angles and the angles of incidence and refraction)
may be set equal to their sines and tangents. At first glance this con-
cept seems utterly useless, since the region is obviously infinitesimal
and seemingly of value only as a limiting case. However, calculations
of the performance of an optical  system based on paraxial relation-
ships are of tremendous utility. Their simplicity makes calculation and
manipulation quick and easy. Since most optical systems of practical
value form good images, it is apparent that most of the light rays orig-
inating at an object point must pass at least reasonably close to the
paraxial image point. The paraxial relationships are the limiting rela-
tionships (as the angles approach zero) of the exact trigonometric rela-
tionships derived in the preceding section, and thus give locations for
image  points  which  serve  as  an  excellent  approximation  for  the
imagery of a well-corrected optical system.
Paradoxically, the paraxial equations are frequently used with rela-
tively  large  angles and ray  heights.  This extension  of  the  paraxial
region is useful in estimating the necessary diameters of optical ele-
ments and in approximating the aberrations of the image formed by a
lens system, as we shall demonstrate in later chapters.
Although paraxial calculations are often used in rough preliminary
work on optical systems and in approximate calculations (indeed, the
term “paraxial approximation” is often used), the reader should bear
in mind that the paraxial equations are perfectly exact for the paraxi-
al region and that as an exact limiting case they are used in aberra-
tion  determination  as  a  basis  of  comparison  to  indicate  how  far  a
trigonometrically computed ray departs from its ideal location.
CA′
sin U′
n
n′
32
Chapter Two
Delete pages on pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages on pdf file; add and delete pages in pdf
Delete pages on pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page in pdf; delete page on pdf document
The  simplest way  of  deriving  a  set  of  equations  for  the  paraxial
region  is to  substitute  the angle  itself for  its sine in the  equations
derived in the preceding section. Thus we get
from Eq. 2.16
ca = -(l - R)u
(2.23)
from Eq. 2.17
i= ca/R
(2.24)
from Eq. 2.18
i′ = ni/n′
(2.25)
from Eq. 2.19
u′ = u - i + i′
(2.26)
from Eq. 2.21
ca′ = n ca/n′
(2.27)
from Eq. 2.22
l′ = R - ca′/u′
(2.28)
Notice that the paraxial equations are distinguished from the trigono-
metric equations by the use of lowercase letters for the paraxial val-
ues. This is a widespread convention and will be observed throughout
this text. Note also that the angles are in radian measure, not degrees.
Equations 2.23 through 2.28 may be materially simplified. Indeed,
since they apply exactly only to a region in which angles and heights
are infinitesimal, we can totally eliminate i, u, and ca from the expres-
sions without any loss of validity. Thus, if we substitute into Eq. 2.28,
Eq. 2.27 for ca′ and Eq. 2.26 for u′, and continue the substitution with
Eqs.  2.23,  2.24,  and  2.25,  the  following  simple  expression  for  l′ is
found:
l′ =
(2.29)
By rearranging we can get an expression which bears a marked sim-
ilarity to Eq. 2.4 and Eq. 2.11 (relating the object and image distances
for a complete lens system):
=
+
(2.30a)
These two equations are useful when the quantity of interest is the
distance l′. If the object and image are at the axial intersection dis-
tances l and l′, the magnification is given by
m=
=
(2.30b)
In Sec. 2.2 we noted that the power of an optical system was the reci-
procal of its effective focal length. In Eq. 2.30a the term (n′ - n)/R is
the  power  of  the  surface. A surface  with  positive  power  will  bend
nl′
n′l
h′
h
n
l
(n′ - n)

R
n′
l′
ln′R

(n′ - n) l + nR
Image Formation (First-Order Optics)
33
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pdf pages reader; delete page in pdf online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pages from pdf reader; delete pdf pages in reader
(converge) a ray toward the axis; a negative-power surface will bend
(diverge) a ray away from the axis.
2.6 Paraxial Raytracing through Several
Surfaces
The ynu raytrace
Another  form  of the  paraxial equations  is more convenient  for  use
when calculations are to be continued through more than one surface.
Figure 2.7 shows a paraxial ray incident on a surface at a height y
from the axis, with the ray-axis intersection distances l and l′ before
and after refraction. The height y in this case is a fictitious extension
of the paraxial region, since, as noted, the paraxial region is an infini-
tesimal one about the axis. However, since all heights and angles can-
cel  out  of  the  paraxial  expressions  for  the  intercept  distances  (as
indicated above), the use of finite heights and angles does not affect
the accuracy of the expressions. For systems of modest aperture these
fictitious  heights  and angles are a reasonable  approximation to  the
corresponding values obtained by exact trigonometrical calculation.
In the paraxial region, every surface approaches a flat plane surface,
just  as  all  angles approach their  sines  and  tangents.  Thus  we  can
express the slope angles shown in Fig. 2.7 by u = -y/l and u′ = -y/l′,
orl = -y/u and l′ = -y/u′. If we substitute these latter values for l and
l′ into Eq. 2.30a, we get
=
+
and multiplying through by y, we find the slope after refraction.
n′u′ = nu - y
(2.31)
It is frequently convenient to express the curvature of a surface as the
reciprocal of its radius, C = 1/R; making this substitution, we have
n′u′ = nu - y (n′ - n) C
(2.31a)
(n′ - n)

R
nu
y
-(n′ - n)

R
n′u′
y
34
Chapter Two
Figure 2.7
Illustrating the rela-
tionship y = -lu = -l′u′ for
paraxial rays.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete page pdf acrobat reader; delete pdf pages ipad
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
C:\test1.pdf") Dim pdf2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\test2.pdf") Dim pageindexes = New Integer() {1, 2, 4} Dim pages = pdf.DuplicatePage(pageindexes
add remove pages from pdf; cut pages from pdf file
To continue  the  calculation to the next  surface  of the system, we
require a set of transfer equations. Figure 2.8 shows two surfaces of an
optical system separated by an axial distance t. The ray is shown after
refraction by  surface #1;  its slope is the  angle u′
1
. The intersection
heights of the ray at the surfaces are y
1
and y
2
, respectively, and since
this is a paraxial calculation, the difference between the two heights
can be given by tu′
1
. Thus, it is apparent that
y
2
=y
1
+tu′
1
=y
1
+t
(2.32)
And if we note that the slope of the ray incident on surface #2 is the
same as the slope after refraction by #1, we get the second transfer
equation
u
2
=u′
1
or
n
2
u
2
=n′
1
u′
1
(2.33)
These equations can now be used to determine the position and size of
the image formed by a complete optical system, as illustrated by the
following example. Note that the paraxial ray heights and ray slopes
are scalable  (i.e.,  they  may be  multiplied by the  same factor).  The
result of scaling is the data of another ray (which has the same axial
intersection).
Example D
Figure 2.9 shows a  typical  problem. The  optical  system consists  of
three surfaces, making a “doublet” lens whose radii, thicknesses, and
indices are indicated in the figure. The object is located 300 mm to the
left of the first surface and extends a height of 20 mm above the axis.
The lens is immersed in air, so that object and image are in a medium
of index n = 1.0.
The first step is to tabulate the parameters of the problem with the
proper signs associated. Following the sign convention given above, we
have the following:
n′
1
u′
1
n′
1
Image Formation (First-Order Optics)
35
Figure  2.8
Illustrating  the
transfer of a paraxial ray from
surface to surface by y
2
=y
1
+
tu′
1
. Note that although the sur-
faces are drawn as curved in the
figure, mathematically they are
treated as planes. Thus the ray
is assumed to travel the axial
spacing t in going from surface
#1 to surface #2.
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
delete pages in pdf online; delete pdf pages online
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET PDF - How to Delete Text from PDF File in VB.NET. VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
acrobat remove pages from pdf; delete page pdf online
h= + 20 mm
l
1
=-300 mm
n
1
=1.0
R
1
=+50 mm
C
1
=+ 0.02
t
1
=10 mm
n′
1
=n
2
=1.5
R
2
=-50 mm
C
2
=-0.02
t
2
=2 mm
n′
2
=n
3
=1.6
R
3
=plano
C
3
=0
n′
3
=1.0
The location of the image can be found by tracing a ray from the point
where the object intersects the axis (O in the figure); the image will
then be located where the ray recrosses the axis at O′. We can use any
reasonable value for the starting data of this ray. Let us trace the path
of the ray starting at O and striking the first surface at a height of 10
mm  above  the  axis.  Thus  y
1
= +10  and  we  get  the  initial  slope 
angle by
u
1
=
=
=+0.0333
and since n
1
=1.0, n
1
u
1
=+0.0333. The slope angle after refraction is
obtained from Eq. 2.31a.
n′
1
u′
1
=-y
1
(n′
1
-n
1
)C
1
+n
1
u
1
=-10 (1.5 - 1.0) (+0.02) + 0.0333
=-0.1 + 0.0333
n′
1
u′
1
=-0.0666
The ray height at surface #2 is found by Eq. 2.32.
y
2
=y
1
+
=10 +
10 (-0.0666)

1.5
t
1
(n′
1
u′
1
)

n′
1
-10
-300
-y
1
l
1
36
Chapter Two
Figure 2.9
Showing the rays traced in Example D.
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
delete pages of pdf; delete pages from pdf document
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
add and remove pages from a pdf; delete a page from a pdf reader
=10 - 0.444
y
2
=9.555
Noting that n
2
u
2
=n′
1
u′
1
, the refraction at the second surface is carried
through by
n′
2
u′
2
=-y
2
(n′
2
-n
2
)C
2
+n
2
u
2
=-9.555 (1.6 - 1.5) (-0.02) -0.0666
=+0.019111 - 0.0666
=-0.047555
and the ray height at the third surface is calculated by
y
3
=y
2
+
=9.555 +
=9.555 - 0.059444 = 9.496111
Since the last surface of the system is plane, i.e., of infinite radius, its
curvature is zero and the product nu is unchanged at this surface:
n′
3
u′
3
=-y
3
(n′
3
-n
3
)C
3
+n
3
u
3
=-9.496111 (1.0 - 1.6) (0) -0.047555 = -0.047555
and
u′
3
=
=-0.047555
Now the location of the image is given by the final intercept length l′,
which is determined by
l′
3
=
=
=+ 199.6846
The execution of a long chain of calculations such as the preceding
is much simplified if the calculation is arranged in a convenient table
form. By ruling the paper in squares, a simple arrangement of the con-
structional parameters at the top of the sheet and the ray data below
helps to speed the calculation and eliminate errors. The following table
(Fig. 2.10) sets forth the curvatures, thicknesses, and indices of the
lens in the first three rows; the next two rows contain the ray heights
and index-slope angle products of the calculation worked out above.
-9.496111

-0.047555
-y
3
u′
3
n′
3
u′
3
n′
3
2(-0.04755)

1.6
t
2
(n′
2
u′
2
)

n′
2
Image Formation (First-Order Optics)
37
The image height can now be found by tracing a ray from the top of
the object and determining the intersection of this ray with the image
plane we have just computed. Such a ray is shown by the dashed line
in Fig. 2.9. If we elect to trace the ray which strikes the vertex of the
first surface, then y
1
will be zero and the initial slope angle will be giv-
en by
u
1
=
=
=-0.0666
The calculation of this ray is indicated in the sixth and seventh rows
of Fig. 2.10 and yields y
3
=-0.52888…and n′
3
u′
3
=-0.067555.
The height of the image, h′ in Fig. 2.9, can be seen to equal the sum
of the ray height at surface #3 plus the amount the ray climbs or drops
in traveling to the image plane.
h′ = y
3
+l′
3
=-0.52888 + 199.6846
=-14.0187
Notice that the expression used to compute h′ is analogous to Eq. 2.32;
if we regard the image plane as surface #4 and the image distance l′
3
=199.6846 as the spacing between surfaces #3 and #4, Eq. 2.32 can be
used to calculate y
4
, which is h′.
Similarly, Eq. 2.32 can be used to determine the initial slope angle
u
1
by regarding the object plane as surface zero and rearranging the
equation to solve for u′
0
=u
1
as shown below:
y
1
=y
0
+t
  
u′
0
=u
1
=
=
h- y
1
l
1
y
1
-y
0
t
0
n′
0
u′
0
n′
0
-0.067555

1.0
n′
3
u′
3
n′
3
-(0 - 20)

-300
-(y
1
-h)

l
1
38
Chapter Two
Figure 2.10
2.7 Calculation of the Focal Points and
Principal Points
In general, the focal lengths of an optical system can easily be calcu-
lated by tracing a ray parallel to the optical axis (i.e., with an initial
slope  angle u equal to zero)  completely through the optical system.
Then the effective focal length (efl) is minus the ray height at the first
surface divided by the ray slope angle u′
k
after the ray emerges from
the last surface. Similarly, the back focal length (bfl) is minus the ray
height at the last surface divided by u′
k
.Using the customary conven-
tion that the data of the last surface of the system are identified by the
subscript k, we can write
efl =
(2.34)
bfl =
(2.35)
The cardinal points of a single lens element can be readily deter-
mined by use of the raytracing formulas given in the preceding section.
The focal point is the point where the rays from an infinitely distant
axial object cross the optical axis at a common focus. As indicated, this
point can be located by tracing a ray with an initial slope (u
1
) of zero
through the lens and determining the axial intercept.
Figure 2.11 shows the path of such a ray through a lens element.
The principal plane (p
2
) is located by the intersection of the extensions
of the incident and emergent rays. The effective focal length (efl) or
focal length (usually symbolized by f ), is the distance from p
2
to f
2
and,
for the paraxial region, is given by
efl = f =
The back focal length (bfl) can be found from
-y
1
u′
2
-y
k
u′
k
-y
1
u′
k
Image Formation (First-Order Optics)
39
Figure 2.11
Aray parallel to the
axis is  traced through an  ele-
ment to determine the effective
focal  length  and  back  focal
length.
bfl =
Owing to the frequency with which these quantities are used, it is
worthwhile to work up a single equation for each of them. If the lens
has an index of refraction n and is surrounded by air of index 1.0, then
n
1
=n′
2
=1.0 and n′
1
=n
2
=n. The surface radii are R
1
and R
2
, and
the surface curvatures are c
1
and c
2
. The thickness is t. At the first sur-
face, using Eq. 2.31a,
n′
1
u′
1
=n
1
u
1
-(n′
1
-n
1
)y
1
c
1
=0 - (n - 1) y
1
c
1
The height at the second surface is found from Eq. 2.32:
y
2
=y
1
+
=y
1
-
=y
1
1-
tc
1
And the final slope is found by Eq. 2.31a:
n′
2
u′
2
=n′
1
u′
1
-y
2
(n′
2
-n
2
)c
2
=- (n - 1)y
1
c
1
-y
1
1-
tc
1
(1 - n) c
2
(1.0)u′
2
=u′
2
=- y
1
(n - 1)
c
1
-c
2
+tc
1
c
2
Thus  the  power   (or  reciprocal  focal  length)  of  the  element  is
expressed as
=
=
=(n - 1)
c
1
-c
2
+tc
1
c
2
(2.36)
or, if we substitute c = 1/R,
=
=(n - 1)
-
+
(2.36a)
The back focal length can be found by dividing y
2
by u′
2
to get
bfl =
=f -
(2.37)
The distance from the second surface to the second principal point is
just the difference between the back focal length and the effective focal
length (see Fig. 2.11); this is obviously the last term of Eq. 2.37.
The above procedure has located the second principal point and sec-
ond focal point of the lens. The “first” points are found simply by sub-
stituting R
1
for R
2
and vice versa.
ft (n - 1)

nr
1
-y
2
u′
2
t(n - 1)

R
1
R
2
n
1
R
2
1
R
1
1
f
(n - 1)
n
-u′
2
y
1
1
f
(n - 1)
n
(n - 1)
n
(n - 1)
n
t(n - 1) y
1
c
1

n
tn′
1
u′
1
n′
1
-y
2
u′
2
40
Chapter Two
The focal points and principal points for several shapes of elements
are  diagramed  in  Fig.  2.12.  Notice  that  the  principal  points  of  an
equiconvex or equiconcave element are approximately evenly spaced
within the element. In the plano forms, one principal point is always
at the curved surface, the other is about one-third of the way into the
lens. In the meniscus forms shown, one of the principal points is com-
pletely outside the lens; in extreme meniscus shapes, both the princi-
pal points lie outside the lens and their order may be reversed from
that shown. Note well that the focal points of the negative elements
are in reversed order compared to a positive element.
If the lens element is not immersed in air, we can derive a similar
expression for it. Assuming that the object medium has an index of n
1
,
the lens index is n
2
; and the image medium has an index of n
3
, then the
two effective focal lengths and the back focal length can be calculated
from
=
=
-
+
(2.38)
bfl = f′ -
(2.39)
f′t (n
2
-n
1
)

n
2
R
1
(n
2
-n
3
) (n
2
-n
1
)t

n
2
R
1
R
2
(n
2
-n
3
)

R
2
(n
2
-n
1
)

R
1
n
3
f′
n
1
f
Image Formation (First-Order Optics)
41
Figure 2.12
The location of the focal points and principal
points  for  several  shapes  of  converging  and  diverging 
elements.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested