c# open pdf file in adobe reader : Delete blank pages in pdf files control SDK system web page winforms .net console smith_modern_optical_engineering50-part153

chapters, we may have led the reader to believe that a speed of f/0.5
was the largest aperture attainable.
This apparent paradox can be resolved by an examination of Fig.
13.40 which shows an f/0.25 parabola. Note that the focal length is
equal to f only for the axial zone and that for marginal zones the focal
length is much larger; for marginal zones the effective focal length of
a parabola is given by
F= f + x = f +
(13.22)
The parabola is thus far from an aplanatic (spherical- and coma-free)
system.  For  an  f/0.25  paraboloid  the  marginal  zone  focal length  is
twice that of the paraxial zone and the magnification is correspond-
ingly larger. Thus, if the object has a finite size, the image formed by
the marginal zones of this mirror will be twice as large as those from
the axial zone; this is, of course, nothing but ordinary coma (the “vari-
ation of magnification with aperture”). The parabola is thus aberra-
tion-free only exactly on the axis.
The apparent contradiction of our image illumination principles is
thus resolved since we had assumed aplanatic systems in their deriva-
tions. From another viewpoint, we can remember that although the
parabola forms a perfect image of an infinitesimal (geometrical) point,
such a point (being infinitesimal) cannot emit a real amount of ener-
gy; the moment one increases the object size to any real dimension, the
parabola has a real field, the image becomes comatic, and the energy
in the image is spread out over a finite blur spot. This reduces the
image illumination to that indicated as the maximum in Chap. 8.
The Cassegrain objective system is used (usually in a modified form)
in a great variety of applications because of its compactness and the
y
2
4f
482
Chapter Thirteen
Figure  13.40
Illustrating  the
extreme variation of focal length
with ray height in an f/0.25 par-
abolic reflector.
Delete blank pages in pdf files - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete a page from a pdf online; delete page in pdf online
Delete blank pages in pdf files - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages pdf files; add and delete pages in pdf online
fact that the second reflection places the image behind the primary
mirror where it is  readily accessible.  It suffers from a very  serious
drawback  when  an appreciable  field of view is required, in that an
extreme  amount  of baffling  is  necessary  to  prevent  stray  radiation
from flooding the image area. Figure 13.41 indicates this difficulty and
the type of baffles frequently used to overcome this problem. An exte-
rior “sunshade,” which is an extension of the main exterior tube of the
scope, is frequently used in addition to the internal baffles.
Because  of  their  uniaxial  character,  aspheric  surfaces  are  much
more difficult to fabricate than ordinary spherical surfaces. A strong
paraboloid may cost an order of magnitude more than the equivalent
sphere; ellipsoids and hyperboloids are a bit more difficult, and non-
conic aspherics are more difficult still. Thus one might well think twice
(or three times) before specifying an aspheric. Often a spherical sys-
tem can be found which will do nearly as well at a fraction of the cost.
This is also true in refracting systems of moderate size where several
ordinary spherical elements can be purchased for the cost of a single
aspheric. For very large one-of-a-kind systems, however, aspherics are
frequently a  sound  choice.  This  is  because  the large  systems  (e.g.,
astronomical objectives) are, in the final analysis, handmade, and the
aspheric surface adds only a little to the optician’s task.
Computer-controlled single-point diamond machining has become a
practical  technique  for  fabricating  aspheric  surfaces.  While  this  is
especially true for infrared optics, aspheric surfaces which owe their
feasibility to  diamond turning are  showing up in many  commercial
applications such as high-level photographic optics. Extremely stable
and  precise  machine  tools  (e.g., lathes, mills)  can  produce surfaces
with turning marks which are small enough to allow their use in high-
quality optical systems. A limitation on diamond turning is that there
is only a small  number of materials which can be diamond turned.
Included are germanium, silicon, aluminum, copper, nickel, zinc sul-
fide, selenide, and plastics. Note that glass and ferrous metals are not
included in this list. However, glass molding techniques have reached
The Design of Optical Systems: Particular
483
Figure  13.41
Complex  conical
baffles  are  necessary  in  a
Cassegrain objective to prevent
stray radiation from flooding the
image plane.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in
delete pages on pdf online; delete page in pdf preview
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create PDF from Open Office files. Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; // Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages PDFDocument doc
delete blank pages in pdf; delete a page from a pdf file
a quality level that permits the molding of aspheric surfaces which are
usable in diffraction-limited systems. For example, both molded glass
and plastic aspheric lenses are made for laser disk objectives. The pre-
cision  molds  for  these  processes  are  made  on  computer-controlled
equipment, and in some cases they are also diamond turned.
Conic section through the origin.
Where r is the radius (at the axis) and
cis the curvature (c = 1/r).
y
2
- 2rx + px
2
=0
x=
=
x=
+
+
+
+
+
...
Ellipse
p> 1
conic constant kappa = p - 1
Circle
p= 1
conic eccentricity e = √1-p
Ellipse
1 > p > 0
Parabola
p= 0
Hyperbola
p< 0
Distance to foci:
(1± √1 - p
)
Magnification:
-
Intersects axis at:
x= 0,
Distance between conic and a circle of the same vertex radius r (i.e.,
departure from a sphere):
∆x =
+
+
+
...
Angle between the normal to the conic and the x axis:
= tan
-1
-y
(r - px)
1̇ 3 ̇ 5 (
p
3
- 1) y
8

2
4
4! r
7
1̇ 3 (
p
2
- 1) y
6

2
3
3! r
5
(p - 1) y
4

2
2
2! r
3
2r
p
1+ √1 - p

1- √1 - p
r
p
1̇ 3 ̇ 5 ̇ 7 p
4
y
10

2
5
5!r
9
1̇ 3 ̇ 5 p
3
y
8

2
4
4!r
7
1̇ 3 p
2
y
6

2
3
3!r
5
1py
4
2
2
2!r
3
y
2
2r
cy
2

1+ √1 - p
c
2
y
2
r± √r
2
- p
y
2

p
484
Chapter Thirteen
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page instance may consist of newly created blank pages or image VB.NET: Edit and Manipulate PDF Pages.
copy pages from pdf to word; delete pages from pdf document
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online
delete page from pdf file; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
sin  =
Radius of curvature:
Meridional:
R
t
=
=
Sagittal (distance to axis along the surface normal):
R
s
=[y
2
+(r -  px)
2
]
1/2
The Schmidt system.
The Schmidt objective (Fig. 13.42) can be viewed
as an attempt to combine the wide uniform image field of the stop-at-
the-center sphere with the “perfect” imagery of the paraboloid. In the
Schmidt, the reflector is a sphere and the spherical aberration is cor-
rected by a thin refracting aspheric plate at the center of curvature.
Thus the concentric character of the sphere is preserved in great mea-
sure, while the spherical aberration is completely eliminated (at least
for one wavelength).
The  aberrations  remaining  are  chromatic  variation  of  spherical
aberration and certain higher-order forms of astigmatism or oblique
spherical which result from the fact that the off-axis ray bundles do
not strike the corrector at the same angle as do the on-axis bundles.
The action of a given zone of the corrector is analogous to that of a thin
refracting prism. For the on-axis bundle, the prism is near minimum
deviation;  as  the  angle  of  incidence  changes,  the  deviation  of  the
“prism”  is increased,  introducing  overcorrected spherical.  Since  the
action is different in the tangential plane than in the sagittal plane,
astigmatism results. This combination is oblique spherical aberration.
The meridional angular blur of a Schmidt system is well approximat-
ed by the expression
[y
2
+(r - px)
2
]
3/2

r
2
R
s
3
r
2
-y

[y
2
+(r - px)
2
]
1/2
The Design of Optical Systems: Particular
485
Figure  13.42
The  Schmidt  sys-
tem  consists  of  a  spherical
reflector with  an aspheric cor-
rector plate at its center of cur-
vature. The aspheric surface in
the f/1  system  shown  here  is
greatly exaggerated.
C# Word - Insert Blank Word Page in C#.NET
specify where they want to insert (blank) Word document rotate Word document page, how to delete Word page NET, how to reorganize Word document pages and how
delete page on pdf reader; delete a page from a pdf reader
C# PowerPoint - Insert Blank PowerPoint Page in C#.NET
where they want to insert (blank) PowerPoint document PowerPoint document page, how to delete PowerPoint page to reorganize PowerPoint document pages and how
add remove pages from pdf; delete page from pdf online
β=
radians
(13.23)
There are obviously an infinite number of aspheric surfaces which
may be used on the corrector plate. If the focus is maintained at the
paraxial focus of the mirror, the paraxial power of the corrector is zero
and it takes the form of a weak concave surface. The best forms have
the shape indicated in Fig. 13.42, with a convex paraxial region and
the  minimum  thickness  at  the  0.866  or  0.707  zone,  depending  on
whether  it  is desired to minimize  spherochromatic aberration  or to
minimize the material to be ground away in fabrication. The perfor-
mance of the Schmidt can be improved slightly by (1) incompletely cor-
recting the axial spherical to compensate for the off-axis overcorrection,
(2) “bending” the corrector slightly, (3) reducing the spacing, (4) using
a slightly aspheric primary to reduce the load on, and thus the over-
correction introduced  by, the  corrector. Further  improvements  have
been made by using more than one corrector and by using an achrom-
atized corrector.
A near-optimal  corrector  plate  has a  surface  shape  given  by  the
equation
z= 0.5Cy
2
+Ky
4
+Ly
6
where
C=
K=
L=
and f is the focal length, f/# is the speed or f-number, and n is the index
of the corrector plate.
The aspheric corrector of the Schmidt is usually easier to fabricate
than is the aspheric surface of the paraboloid reflector. This is because
the index difference across the glass corrector surface is about 0.5 com-
pared to the effective index difference of 2.0 at the reflecting surface of
the paraboloid, making it only one-fourth as sensitive to fabrication
errors.
An aspheric corrector plate of this type can be added to most optical
systems. One must remember that an aspheric surface placed at the
aperture stop (as in the Schmidt system) will affect only the spherical
aberration and that the aspheric must be placed well away from the
1

85.8 (1 - n) f
5
1- 
64 (
3
f/#)
2
2

32 (1 - n) f
3
3

128 (n - 1) f (f/#)
2
u
p
2
48 (f/#)
3
486
Chapter Thirteen
How to C#: Cleanup Images
returned. Delete Blank Pages. Set property BlankPageDelete to true , blank pages in the document will be deleted. Remove Edges or Borders.
delete blank pages in pdf files; cut pages from pdf reader
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Dim outputFile As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" ' Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages Dim doc As PDFDocument = PDFDocument
delete page from pdf acrobat; delete pages from pdf without acrobat
stop if it is to be used to correct coma or astigmatism. An aspheric plate
can be added to any of the two-mirror systems described in previous
sections;  if both  mirrors  are  aspheric,  the addition of  the corrector
plate provides enough degrees of freedom to correct spherical, coma,
and  astigmatism.  Corrector  plates  have been  used in  the  entrance
beam or in the image space. An example is the “Schmidt Cassegrain,”
where  both  mirrors  of  the  Cassegrain  configuration  are  simple
spheres. The aspheric corrector plate is the front window of the system
and is often used to support the secondary mirror. This is an econom-
ical and commercially successful system.
The Mangin mirror.
The Mangin mirror is perhaps the simplest of the
catadioptric (i.e., combined reflecting and refracting) systems. It con-
sists of a second-surface spherical mirror with the power of the first
surface chosen to correct the spherical aberration of the reflecting sur-
face. Figure 13.43 shows a Mangin mirror. The design of a Mangin is
straightforward. One radius is chosen arbitrarily (a value about 1.6
times the desired focal length is suitable for the reflector surface) and
the other radius is varied systematically until the spherical aberration
is corrected. The correction is exact for only one zone, however, and an
undercorrected zonal residual remains. The size of the angular blur
spot resulting from the zonal spherical can be approximated (for aper-
tures smaller than about f/1.0) by the empirical expression
β
=
radians
(13.24)
Note that this is the minimum-diameter blur and that the “hard-core”
blur diameter is smaller, as discussed in Chap. 11. At larger apertures,
the angular blur predicted by Eq. 13.24 is too small; for example, at
f/0.7 the blur is about 0.002 radians, almost twice as large as that pre-
dicted by Eq. 13.24.
Since the Mangin is roughly equivalent to an achromatic reflector
plus a pair of simple negative lenses, the system has a very large over-
corrected chromatic aberration. This can be corrected by making an
achromatic  doublet  out  of  the  refracting  element.  For  the  simple
Mangin, the chromatic angular blur is approximated by
β
=
radians
(13.25)
where V is the Abbe V-value of the material used. Note that this is only
about one-third of the chromatic of a simple lens.
The coma blur of the Mangin primary mirror is approximately one-
half of that given by Eq. 13.19. Since the spherical aberration is cor-
rected, little change in the coma results from a shift of the stop position.
1
6V (f/#)
10
-3
4 (f/#)
4
The Design of Optical Systems: Particular
487
VB.NET PDF: Get Started with PDF Library
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" ' Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages Dim doc
delete pages from a pdf online; delete page pdf acrobat reader
The Mangin principle may be applied to the secondary mirror of a
system as well as to the primary. The right-hand sketch of Fig. 13.43
shows  a  Cassegrain  type  of  system  in  which  the  secondary  is  an
achromatic Mangin mirror. Such a system is relatively economical and
light in weight, since all surfaces are spheres and only the small sec-
ondary needs to be made of high-quality optical material. The power of
a thin second-surface reflecting element is given by
= 2C
1
(n - 1) - 2C
2
n
The Mangin mirror is often used as an element of a more complex
system. For example, the primary or secondary of a system may be a
Mangin; as such, it serves to correct aberrations without adding sig-
nificantly to the weight of the system and often effectively replaces an
expensive aspheric surface.
The Bouwers (Maksutov) system.
The Bouwers (or Maksutov) system
may be considered a logical extension of the Mangin mirror principle
in which the correcting lens is separated from the mirror to allow two
additional degrees of freedom, producing a great improvement in the
image quality of the system.
Apopular version of  this device is the  Bouwers  concentric  system,
shown in Fig. 13.44. In this system, all surfaces are made concentric to
the aperture stop, which (as we have noted in the case of the simple
spherical mirror) results in a system with uniform image quality over the
entire field of view. This is an exceedingly simple system to design, since
there are only three degrees of freedom, namely, the three curvatures.
One chooses R
1
to set the scale of the lens (a value of R
1
equal to about
85 percent of the intended focal length is appropriate) and R
2
to provide
an appropriate thickness for the corrector, and then determines the val-
ue of R
3
for which the marginal spherical is zero. Because of the mono-
488
Chapter Thirteen
Figure 13.43
In the Mangin mirror (left) the spherical aberration of the sec-
ond surface reflector is corrected by the refracting first surface. In the right-
hand sketch, the spherical is corrected by a Mangin-type secondary. The
dotted lines indicate the manner in which color correction can be achieved. In
a doublet Mangin, glass choice can be used as a design freedom.
centric construction, coma and astigmatism are zero, and the image is
located on a spherical surface which is also concentric to the stop and
whose radius equals the focal length of the system. Thus only a few rays
need be traced to completely determine the correction of the system.
One of the interesting features of this system is that the concentric
corrector element may be inserted anywhere in the system (as long as
it remains concentric) and it will produce exactly the same image cor-
rection. Two equivalent positions for the corrector are shown in Fig.
13.44. A third position is in the convergent beam, between the mirror
and the image.
If  we  accept  the  curved  focal  plane,  the  only  aberrations  of  the
Bouwers  concentric  system  are  residual  zonal  spherical  aberration
and longitudinal (axial) chromatic aberration. In general, as the cor-
rector thickness is increased, the zonal is reduced and the chromatic is
increased.
The concentric system described above is used for most applications
requiring a wide field of view. When the field requirements permit, the
zonal spherical or the chromatic may be reduced by departing from the
concentric  mode  of  construction,  although this is,  of  course, accom-
plished at the expense of the coma and astigmatism correction.
If one of the thick-lens equations (Eq. 2.36 or 2.37) is differentiated
with respect to the index, the result can be set equal to zero and the
equation solved for the shape of an element whose power or image dis-
tance does not  vary with a  change  in index (or  a change in  wave-
length). This is an achromatic singlet. It takes the shape of a thick
meniscus element, and this can be used as an achromatic corrector,
just as in Fig. 13.44. This is the basis of the Maksutov system.
The Design of Optical Systems: Particular
489
Figure 13.44
In the Bouwers concentric catadioptric sys-
tem, all the surfaces are concentric about the aperture.
The “front” and “rear” versions of the corrector are identi-
cal and produce identical correction. The rear system is
more compact, but the front system can be better correct-
ed, since it can utilize a greater corrector thickness with-
out  interference  with  the  focal  surface.  Occasionally,
correctors in both locations are utilized simultaneously.
Another  means of effecting chromatic  correction is shown in Fig.
13.45a, in which the corrector meniscus is made achromatic. Note that
concentricity is destroyed by this technique, although if the crown and
flint elements are made of materials with the same index but different
V-values (e.g., DBC-2, 617:549, and DF-2, 617:366), the concentricity
can be preserved for the wavelength at which the indices match, and
only the chromatic correction will vary with obliquity.
Avery powerful system results if the concentric Bouwers system is
combined with a Schmidt-type aspheric corrector plate, as shown in
Fig. 13.45b. Since the aspheric plate need only correct the small zon-
al residual of the concentric system, its effects are relatively weak
and the variation of effects with obliquity are correspondingly small.
The Baker-Nunn satellite tracking cameras are based on this princi-
ple,  although  their  construction  is  more  elaborate,  using  double-
meniscus correctors and three (achromatized) aspheric correctors at
the stop.
The basic Bouwers-Maksutov meniscus corrector principle has been
utilized  in  a  multitude  of  forms.  A few  of  the  possible  Cassegrain
embodiments of the principle are shown in Fig. 13.46. The reader can
probably devise an equal number in a few minutes. An arrangement
similar to that shown in Fig. 13.46c is frequently used in homing mis-
sile guidance systems. The corrector makes a reasonably aerodynamic
window, or dome, and although the system is not concentric, the pri-
mary and secondary can be gimballed as a unit about the center of cur-
vature of the dome so that the “axial” correction is maintained as the
direction of sight is varied.
490
Chapter Thirteen
Figure  13.45
(a)  An  achroma-
tized meniscus corrector. (b) An
aspheric  corrector  plate at the
stop removes the residual zonal
spherical aberration of the con-
centric system.
There is a tremendous number of variations of the catadioptric prin-
ciple. Refractive correctors in almost every conceivable form have been
combined with mirrors. Positive field lenses have been used to flatten
the overcorrected Petzval surface of the basic concave reflector, coma-
correcting field elements have been used with paraboloids, and multi-
ple nonmeniscus correctors have been used with spheres, to name just
a few of the variations on the device. The basic strength of this gener-
al system is, of course, the relatively small aberration inherent in a
spherical reflector; the corrector’s task is to remove the faults without
losing the virtues.
Two or more closely spaced thin-corrector elements whose total pow-
er  is  effectively  zero  can be  shaped to  correct  the  aberrations of  a
spherical mirror. If the glass is the same for all of the corrector ele-
ments, then the combination will have little or no chromatic, primary
or secondary. Additional examples of catadioptric systems are shown
in Figs. 14.29, 14.30, and 14.31.
13.6 The Rapid Estimation of Blur Sizes for
Simple Optical Systems
It is frequently useful to be able to estimate the size of the aberration
blur produced by  an optical system  without going to the trouble of
The Design of Optical Systems: Particular
491
Figure 13.46
Four of the many possible Cassegrain versions of the
meniscus corrector catadioptric system..
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested