c# open pdf file in adobe reader : Delete blank pages in pdf Library software component .net winforms azure mvc smith_modern_optical_engineering51-part154

making a raytrace analysis. In preliminary engineering work or the
preparation of technical proposals, where time is limited, the following
material (which is based largely on third-order aberration analysis or
empirical studies) can be of value.
The  aberrations  are  expressed  in terms  of  the angular size β (in
radians) of the blur spot which they produce; β may be converted to B,
the linear  diameter of the blur,  by multiplying by  the system  focal
length. In this section the object will be assumed to be at infinity.
Where the blur size for more than one aberration is given, the sum
of all the aberration blurs will yield a conservative (i.e., large) estimate
of the total blur.
Where the blur is due to chromatic aberration, the blur angle given
encompasses the total energy in the image of a point. Occasionally it
is of value to know that 75 to 90 percent of the energy is contained in
a blur one-half as large, and 40 to 60 percent of the energy is contained
in a blur one-quarter as large as that given by the equations. In the
visible, the chromatic blur is usually reduced by a factor of about 40 by
achromatizing the system.
The blurs given for spherical aberration are the minimum-diameter
blur sizes; these values are the most useful for work with detectors.
For visual or photographic work, a “hard-core” focus, as discussed in
Chap. 11, is preferable, and the blurs given here should be modified
accordingly.
Note that with the exception of Eqs. 13.26 and 13.27, all the blurs
are based on geometrical considerations. It is, therefore, wise to eval-
uate Eq. 13.26 or 13.27 first to be certain that the geometrical blurs
are  not  smaller  than  the  diffraction  pattern  before  basing  further
effort on the geometrical results.
More complete discussions of the individual systems may be found
in the preceding section.
Diffraction-limited systems.
The diameter of the first dark ring of the
Airy pattern is given by
β=
radians
(13.26)
B= 2.44 (f/#) =
(13.27)
where  is the wavelength, D is the clear aperture of the system, (f/#)
=f/D is the relative aperture, and f is the focal length. The “effective”
diameter of the blur (for modulation transfer purposes) is about one-
half the above.
1.22
NA
2.44
D
492
Chapter Thirteen
Delete blank pages in pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page from pdf acrobat; delete page on pdf document
Delete blank pages in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page from pdf; delete page on pdf file
Spherical mirror
Spherical aberration: β =
radians
(13.28)
Sagittal coma:
β=
radians
(13.29)
Astigmatism:
β=
radians
(13.30)
where l
p
is the mirror-to-stop distance, R is the mirror radius, (l
p
-R)
is the center-to-stop distance, and U
p
is the half-field angle in radians.
The focal plane of a spherical mirror is on a spherical surface concen-
tric to the mirror when the stop is at the center of curvature.
Paraboloidal mirror
Spherical aberration: β = 0
(13.31)
Sagittal coma:
β=
radians
(13.32)
Astigmatism:
β=
radians
(13.33)
where the symbols have been defined above.
Schmidt system
Spherical aberration:
β= 0
(13.34)
Higher-order aberrations:
β=
radians
(13.35)
Spherochromatic:
β=
(13.35a)
Mangin mirror (Stop at the mirror):
Zonal spherical:
β=
radians
(13.36)
Chromatic aberration:
β=
) radians
(13.37)
1
6V (f/#
10
-3
4 (f/#)
4
1

256V (f/#)
3
U
p
2
48 (f/#)
3
(l
p
+f) U
p
2

2f (f/#)
U
p
16 (f/#)
2
(l
p
- R)
2
U
p
2

2R
2
(f/#)
(l
p
- R) U
p

16R (f/#)
2
0.0078
(f/#)
3
The Design of Optical Systems: Particular
493
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in
delete a page from a pdf without acrobat; copy pages from pdf to new pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online
delete page from pdf file online; cut pages from pdf online
Sagittal coma:
β=
radians
(13.38)
Astigmatism:
β=
radians
(13.39)
Simple thin lens.
(Minimum spherical shape):
Spherical aberration: β =
radians
(13.40)
K= 0.0067
for n = 1.5
=0.027
for n = 2.0
=0.0129
for n = 3.0
=0.0103
for n = 3.5
=0.0087
for n = 4.0
Chromatic aberration: β =
radians
(13.41)
Sagittal coma:
β=
radians
(13.42)
Astigmatism:
β=
radians (at compromise focus)
(13.43)
where n is the index of refraction, V is the reciprocal relative disper-
sion, and the stop is at the lens.
Concentric Bouwers.
The expressions for monochromatic aberrations
are empirical and are derived from the performance graphs and tables
given by Bouwers and by Lauroesch and Wing (see references).
Rear concentric (solid line in Fig. 13.44).
The maximum corrector thick-
ness of this form must be limited to keep the image from falling inside
the corrector. With the thickest possible corrector:
Zonal spherical:
β≈
radians
(13.44)
General concentric
Zonal spherical:
β≈
radians
(13.45)
10
-4

t
f
+0.06
(f/#)
5
4× 10
-4

(f/#)
5.5
U
p
2
2 (f/#)
U
p

16 (n + 2) (f/#)
2
1
2V (f/#)
K
(f/#)
3
U
p
2
2 (f/#)
U
p
32 (f/#)
2
494
Chapter Thirteen
C# Word - Insert Blank Word Page in C#.NET
Users to Insert (Empty) Word Page or Pages from a to specify where they want to insert (blank) Word document rotate Word document page, how to delete Word page
delete page pdf online; delete pages pdf online
C# PowerPoint - Insert Blank PowerPoint Page in C#.NET
to Insert (Empty) PowerPoint Page or Pages from a where they want to insert (blank) PowerPoint document PowerPoint document page, how to delete PowerPoint page
delete page in pdf document; acrobat export pages from pdf
Chromatic aberration: β ≈
radians
(13.46a)
or very approximately: β ≈ 0.6 
radians
(13.46b)
Corrected concentric
Higher-order aberrations:
β≈
radians 
(13.47)
where t is the corrector plate thickness, f is the system focal length, ∆n
is the dispersion of the corrector material, n is the index of the correc-
tor, and R
1
and R
2
are the radii of the corrector. These expressions
apply for corrector index values in the 1.5 to 1.6 range and for relative
apertures to the order of f/1.0 or f/2.0. For speeds faster than f/1.0, the
monochromatic blur angles are larger than above (e.g., about 20 per-
cent larger at f/0.7).  The use of a high-index  corrector (n > 2)  will
reduce the monochromatic blur somewhat at high speeds.
The charts of Figs. 13.47 to 13.54 are designed to give a rapid, albeit
incomplete, estimation of the performance of the systems discussed in
this section.
Figure 13.47 is used by locating the intersection of a wavelength line
with  the  appropriate  diagonal  aperture  line.  The  linear  blur  spot
diameter B may be converted to the angular blur spot diameter β by
locating the abscissa corresponding to the intersection of the B diame-
ter ordinate with the appropriate diagonal focal-length line.
Figures 13.48, 13.49, and 13.51 assume that the aperture stop is in
contact with the lens or mirror. The blur size for the angle-dependent
aberrations is found by locating the intersection of a horizontal field
angle line with the diagonal f-number line.
Figure 13.52 plots the spherical aberration blur as a function of ele-
ment shape and index of refraction. This plot makes the effect of a
change of index quite apparent. As the index is increased, the spheri-
cal aberration is reduced, and the shape of the element which yields
the minimum amount of spherical becomes more and more meniscus.
This illustrates why lens designers use high-index glasses to improve
a lens design. Note that the minimum spherical for an index of 4.0 is
the same as that of a mirror.
Figure  13.53 shows  the  effect of splitting  an element into two or
more elements. For an index of 1.5, splitting a lens in two reduces the
spherical by  a  factor of  about  5;  dividing the  lens  into  three  parts
reduces it by a factor of about 20. If the lens is split into four parts, the
third-order spherical can be reduced to zero. This effect is widely uti-
9.75 (U
p
+7.2U
p
3
)̇ 10
-5

(f/#)
6.5
n
n
2
(f/#)
t
f
tf
n

2n
2
R
1
R
2
(f/#)
The Design of Optical Systems: Particular
495
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
String outputFile = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; // Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages PDFDocument doc = PDFDocument.Create(2
delete page from pdf online; delete pages of pdf
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page is the programmatic representation of a PDF document instance may consist of newly created blank pages or image
delete page pdf acrobat reader; delete pdf pages android
lized to improve the image quality of more complex lenses. See, for
example, Figs. 12.9, 13.20, and 13.21.
Avery rough idea of the geometrical modulation transfer factor of
the system can be obtained by using Fig. 13.54. The total angular blur
spot for the system is determined (by summing the individual aberra-
tion blurs) and is then multiplied by the desired spatial frequency in
cycles per radian. The modulation transfer factor may then be read
directly from the figure. Note that this is very approximate and is not
reliable when the total blur is of the same order of magnitude as the
Airy disk (see the discussion in Chap. 11).
496
Chapter Thirteen
Figure 13.47
Blur spot size chart for diffraction-limited systems. Diameter is
that of the first dark ring of the Airy disk.
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Dim outputFile As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" ' Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages Dim doc As PDFDocument = PDFDocument
delete page numbers in pdf; delete page on pdf reader
How to C#: Cleanup Images
returned. Delete Blank Pages. Set property BlankPageDelete to true , blank pages in the document will be deleted. Remove Edges or Borders.
delete pdf page acrobat; delete pages out of a pdf file
The Design of Optical Systems: Particular
497
Figure 13.49
Blur spot size charts for Mangin mirrors.
Figure 13.48
Blur spot size charts for spherical reflector. Charts B
and C also apply to a paraboloidal reflector; Fig. 13.47 may be used
for a paraboloid on axis.
VB.NET PDF: Get Started with PDF Library
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" ' Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages Dim doc
delete pages from pdf in preview; delete a page from a pdf in preview
498
Chapter Thirteen
Figure 13.50
Blur  spot  size chart. Chart A:  Schmidt  systems.
Charts B, C, and D: Concentric Bouwers systems.
Figure 13.51
Blur spot size charts for a single refracting ele-
ment.
Bibliography
Note: Titles preceded by an asterisk (*) are out of print. See also ref-
erences for Chap. 12.
Benford,  J.,  and  H.  Rosenberger,  “Microscope  Objectives  and
Eyepieces,”  in  W.  Driscoll  (ed.),  Handbook  of  Optics, New  York,
McGraw-Hill, 1978.
The Design of Optical Systems: Particular
499
Figure 13.52
The angular spherical aberration blur 
β
of a single-lens element as
a function of shape for various values of the index of refraction. is the element
power;y is the semiaperture. The angular blur can be converted to longitudinal
spherical by LA = -2
β
/y
2
. (Object at infinity.)
Benford, J., “Microscope Objectives,” in Kingslake (ed.), Applied Optics
and Optical Engineering, vol. 3, New York, Academic, 1965.
Betensky, E., in Shannon and Wyant (eds.), Applied Optics and Optical
Engineering, vol. 8, New York, Academic, 1980 (photographic lens-
es).
Betensky,  E.,  M.  Kreitzer,  and  J.  Moskovich,  “Camera  Lenses”  in
Handbook of Optics, vol. 2, New York, McGraw-Hill, 1995, Chap. 16.
500
Chapter Thirteen
Figure 13.53
The spherical aberration of one, two, three, and four thin lens-
es, each bent for minimum spherical aberration, as a function of the index
of  refraction.  The  number  of  elements  in  the  set  is  i. (Object  at 
infinity.)
Figure  13.54
The  modulation
transfer characteristic of a sys-
tem with an angular blur 
β
(in
radians) for a sinusoidal object
with  a  spatial  frequency  of  v
cycles per radian. This is a plot
of MTF  = 2J
1
β
v)/π
β
v and
assumes that the image blur is a
uniformly illuminated disk.
*Bouwers, W., Achievement in Optics, New York, Elsevier, 1950.
Cook, G., in Kingslake (ed.), Applied Optics and Optical Engineering,
vol. 3, New York, Academic, 1965 (photographic objectives).
*Dimitroff  and  J.  Baker,  Telescopes  and  Accessories, London,
Blakiston, 1945.
Fischer, R. (ed.), Proc. International Lens Design Conf., S.P.I.E., vol.
237, 1980.
Goldberg,  N., “Cameras,” in  Handbook  of  Optics, vol. 2,  New York,
McGraw-Hill, 1995, Chap. 15.
Inoue, S., and R.  Oldenboug, “Microscopes,” in Handbook of Optics,
vol. 2, New York, McGraw-Hill, 1995, Chap. 17.
Johnson,  R. B., “Lenses,” in  Handbook of Optics, vol.  2,  New York,
McGraw-Hill, 1995, Chap. 1.
Jones,  L.,  “Reflective and Catadioptric  Objectives,” in  Handbook  of
Optics, vol. 2, New York, McGraw-Hill, 1995, Chap. 18.
Kingslake,  R.,  Optics  in  Photography, S.P.I.E.  Press,  Bellingham,
Wash., 1992.
Kingslake,  R.,  A History  of  the  Photographic  Lens, San  Diego,
Academic, 1989.
Korsch, D., Reflective Optics, New York, Academic Press, 1991.
Laikin, M., Lens Design, New York, Marcel Dekker, 1991.
Lauroesch,  T.,  and C. Wing, J.  Opt.  Soc. Am., vol. 49, 1959, p. 410
(Bouwers systems).
Maksutov, D., J. Opt. Soc. Am., vol. 34, 1944, p. 270.
Patrick, F., in Kingslake (ed.), Applied Optics and Optical Engineering,
vol. 5, New York, Academic, 1965 (military optical instruments).
Riedl, M. J., Optical Design for Infrared Systems, S.P.I.E., vol. TT20,
1995.
Rosin, J., in Kingslake (ed.), Applied Optics and Optical Engineering,
vol. 3, New York, Academic, 1965 (eyepieces and magnifiers).
Rutten,  H.,  and  M.  van Venrooij,  Telescopic  Optics, Richmond,  VA,
Willmann-Bell, 1988.
Schroeder, D., Astronomical Optics, San Diego, Academic, 1987.
Shannon, R., in Shannon and Wyant (eds.), Applied Optics and Optical
Engineering, vol. 8, New York, Academic, 1980 (aspherics).
Smith, W. J., Modern Lens Design, New York, McGraw-Hill, 1992.
Smith, W. J. (ed.), Lens Design, S.P.I.E., vol. CR41, 1992.
Smith,  W.,  in  W.  Driscoll  (ed.),  Handbook  of  Optics, New  York,
McGraw-Hill, 1978.
Smith,  W.,  in  Wolfe  and  Zissis  (eds.),  The  Infrared  Handbook,
Washington, Office of Naval Research, 1985.
Taylor, W., and D. Moore (eds.), Proc. International Lens Design Conf.,
S.P.I.E., vol. 554, 1985.
The Design of Optical Systems: Particular
501
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested