c# open pdf file in adobe reader : Delete page pdf control SDK system azure winforms web page console TPOL_book18-part1526

Constructivist teaching tends to be more holistic, more collab-
orative in method, and more encouraging and accepting of learner
initiatives, including greater freedom and variety in assignments
and assessments (Henriques, 1997). The role of the instructor also
changes in constructivist teaching from “sage on the stage” to
“guide on the side,” or coach (Burge 
&
Roberts, 1993; French,
Hale, Johnson, 
&
Farr, 1999). Constructivism is discussed further
in Chapter 1 of this volume. 
In relation to Figure 6-1, constructivist teaching addresses the
teaching  tasks  shown  by  emphasizing  the  learners’  unique
background and consequent preparedness. Constructivist learning
outcomes strive to apply real-world standards, and to assure that
learning  outcomes  are  applicable  beyond  a  merely  academic
context. “Higher-order” constructivist outcomes have the potential
to be relevant in daily life to real problems or situations.
The uses of technology may vary, too, in different constructivist
environments. Socialand radicalconstructivists view interaction as
of greater importance to learning than mere access to information,
while information processing and interactive constructivists view
information, facts, and contact with a wide circle of informed
people as critical to the student’s development of a fully adequate
construction of the world (Henriques, 1997).
In  common,  constructivists  tend  to  use  technologies  for
purposes such as those identified by Jonassen (1998):
• acquainting and involving students with real-world problems
and situations.
• modeling the analytic and thinking skills of the instructor and
other experts, which learners then apply, with appropriate feed-
back, to their own problems and constructs.
• working within an authentic problem context that reflects as
much as possible the problem’s real context and characteristics.
Overall, the contribution online media often make to construc-
tivist teaching is in expanding the range and variety of experiences
usually  available  in  classroom-based  learning.  Because  online
media are by definition linked to networks of external resources,
they can provide access to people, ideas, and information beyond
those found in the classroom. Whether the result is a nearly self-
sufficientcollaborative learning environment (Jonassen, 1998), or,
149
Media Characteristics and Online Learning Technology
Delete page pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages from pdf document; copy page from pdf
Delete page pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages of pdf; cut pages from pdf
more simply, a forum for problem-based learning (Bridges, 1992),
the result is an opening-up of the learning space to a wider variety
of ideas and points of view.
Med
i
a, Modes, and 
L
earn
i
ng
B
ackground Concepts
Technologies, as channelsthrough which modes(symbols acting as
stimuli)  pass,  differ  in  the  responses  they  evoke  in  users.  For
example, text is a mode of presentation. Print-on-paper is one pos-
sible medium (channel) for text, but there are others: a computer
monitor, an overhead projection, a television screen, film (moving or
still), etc. Wherever it is used, text remains text, and must be read to
be comprehended.
Despite  their  different  characteristics,  useful  online  training
technologies  have  in  common  the effect  of  somehow bringing
students into contact with their tutors, the content, and their peers
(Moore, 1989). In this way, media may help to reduce “trans-
actional distance” in learning—the communication gap or psycho-
logical distance between participants which may open in a teaching-
learning situation (Chen  & Willits,  1998). Although similar in
producing  these  outcomes,  the  differences  in  how  various
technologies accomplish their effects are important to their potential
usefulness.
Human and Techno
l
ogy
-
based Teach
i
ng
Technologies  differ from  one  another,  and instruction  delivered
online  differs  from  human-delivered  teaching.  Consider,  in  the
analysis below (Figure 6-2), the  effects of  media-based  training
compared with training done by stand-up, face-to-face instructors
(Fischer, 1997).
 conclusion following from Figure 6-2  is that, as  in most
instructional design decisions, there are trade-offs related to the
needs of the users and the resources available. An analysis such as
that presented above may assist in identifying the trade-offs involved
in the choice of one online technology over another approach.
150
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
pdf delete page; delete blank page in pdf online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
delete page pdf; delete pages on pdf online
151
Media Characteristics and Online Learning Technology
Training 
element
Planning 
and 
preparation
Expertise
Interactivity
Learning 
retention
Consistency
Feedback, 
performance 
tracking
Figure 6-2.
Comparison of human
and technology-based
instruction.
Elements: Fischer, 1997, pp. 29-30.
Technology-based
training
Must be systematically
designed to conform to
the training plan
May depart from
industry standards if
subject-matter experts
are not carefully
selected, or if materials
are not kept current
Can focus on individual
needs for content,
pacing, review,
remediation, etc.
Can be up to 50%
higher than for
instructor-led group
training
Rigorously maintains
the standards set for it,
but may also adapt to
learner’s performance or
preferences, if designed
to do so
Better at keeping
records and generating
reports of outcomes;
designing systems to
adapt instruction based
on feedback (a
cybernetic system) is
costly, complex
Human trainer
Can design training to
correspond to the
training plan, then
assure subsequent
consistency with the
plan
Presenters hired from
industry represent the
most current knowledge
and highest expertise
Tend to train the group,
ignore individual needs
Retention rates vary
Tend to adapt to the
audience, lose
consistency
Humans are especially
good at ongoing
evaluation, and
response to trainee
performance
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF: Insert PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Insert a New Page to PDF in VB.NET. Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program.
best pdf editor delete pages; delete pdf pages reader
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete pages from a pdf file; delete pdf page acrobat
Interestingly, it appears from Figure 6-2 that human trainers are
superior in exactly those activities shown to be overlooked in
Figure 6-1: planning and preparation, and feedback and perfor-
mance tracking (in relation to higher-order outcomes). Human
trainers can deftly detect and respond to unexpected needs, if
disposed and permitted to do so, while technology-based training
programs must be specially designed to assess and respond to
unanticipated  outcomes.  Fleming’s  (1987)  framework  again
appears to be superior for analysis of media’s design needs. 
Med
i
a Character
i
st
i
cs and 
I
mpacts on 
L
earn
i
ng
Five types of media, from print to multimedia (defined as “the
integration of video, audio, graphics, and data within a single
computer workstation”; Bates, Harrington, Gilmore, & van Soest,
1992, p. 6, cited in Oliver, 1994, p. 169), are discussed below. The
intention is to make distinctions among media in relation to modes
of  delivery  and  presentation  commonly  used  in  teaching  and
training. The argument here is that, as technologies continue to
evolve, it will be increasingly possible, technically, to use ever more
complex media, including multimedia as defined above, to deliver
instruction. Criteria will be needed, therefore, for making wise
choices among the options, and for  designing  and  supporting
instruction based not only on the capabilities of the technology to
deliver it, but also on the ability of learners to make effective use of
the tools.
Pr
i
nt and Text
There is no medium more ubiquitous than print, and no mode
more familiar than text in its many forms. Print was part of the first
teaching  machine—the  book—and  books  were  the  first  mass-
produced commodity (McLuhan, 1964, p. 174). Print has been the
dominant medium to date in distance education (Scriven, 1993, 
p. 73), and distance students have traditionally spent most of their
time studying alone, often using print materials only (Bates, 1995,
p. 52). The question is whether this situation is likely to continue.
The answer requires consideration of the strengths and weaknesses
152
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; Delete image objects in selected PDF page in ASPX webpage.
add and delete pages from pdf; add and delete pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET: Delete a Character in PDF Page. It demonstrates how to delete a character in the first page of sample PDF file with the location of (123F, 187F).
delete pages from a pdf reader; delete blank pages in pdf
of text and print.  The chief  strengths of print and text have
traditionally included
• cost—Bates (1995, p. 4) reports that print is one of the lowest
cost one-way technologies.
• flexibility and robustness—print scores highest on these features
(Koumi, 1994).
• portability and ease of production—with desktop publishing
hardware  and  software,  printing  has  become  enormously
simpler and its quality much higher (Bates, 1988). In addition,
costs can be reduced with local production.
• stability  (Kozma,  1991)—organization  and  sequencing  are
positively affected, since text-only printed and online materials
can be reorganized and resequenced with relative ease by cut-
and-paste operations, using word-processors and 
HTML 
editors.
• convenience, familiarity, and economy—instruction and feed-
back are facilitated by the medium’s familiarity, as, for adept
learners and the highly literate, are higher-order thinking and
concept formation (Pittman, 1987).
Ironically, the major disadvantages of print are related to some
of its advantages, and include those listed below (Newby et al.,
2000). 
• Print is static, and may fail to gain adequate involvement from
low-functioning readers. Attention, perception and recall, and
active learner participation may thus be lower for less able
learners. 
• Print is relatively non-interactive, or at least non-responsive, and
may lead to passive, rote learning.
• Print often requires substantial literacy levels. 
Print is accessible (to the literate), and comparatively low in
cost; furthermore, online text is easy to produce, translates well
across various platforms and operating systems, and in some of its
forms, may be manipulated by the user if desired. However, print
may be seen by some as the “slightly seedy poor relation” (Pittman,
1987)  of  other  instructional  media.  Text’s  lack  of  appeal  is
exacerbated by the alternatives to reading which are increasingly
appearing,  and  which  use  multimedia  (especially  audio  and
153
Media Characteristics and Online Learning Technology
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
document. If you find certain page in your PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page directly. Moreover, when
add and delete pages in pdf online; delete page from pdf reader
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
C#.NET Sample Code: Delete Text from Specified PDF Page. The following demo code will show how to delete text in specified PDF page. // Open a document.
delete pages from pdf acrobat; delete page in pdf online
graphics) and improvements in voice recognition and reproduction
technologies to make reading less critical for users. As a result, non-
print multimedia-based technologies could come to be regarded as
cost-effective, especially in cultures or industries where high levels
of literacy cannot be assumed, or  where the costs of reading
inefficiencies are high. Developments such as instant text messaging
and e-paper could reverse this trend, giving print and print-based
materials new life, at least until e-paper-based multimedia evolve to
make text less important once more (Mann, 2001).
St
ill
Graph
i
cs and Stat
i
c D
i
sp
l
ays
A wide and growing selection of graphic technologies is available
to online programmers, from older technologies, such as overhead
projectors and 35mm slide projectors, broadcast 
TV
, and pre-
produced videotapes, to various forms of digital video (interactive
and non-interactive), computer-generated video, and interpersonal
communications  tools  such  as  group  and  desktop  video-
conferencing using Voice over Internet Protocol (
VoIP
).
Graphics can increase the motivation of users to attend, prompt
perception, and aid recall, and assist in the development of higher-
order thinking and concept formation. Furthermore, still graphics
combine high information content (they can illustrate abstract or
unfamiliar concepts) with relatively low production and distri-
bution costs. Online compression formats, such as .jpg, permit low-
bandwidth distribution of high quality graphics.
Screen resolution can be an issue in the use of graphics. The size
at which a graphic is captured is key: capture at a high resolution
and display at a lower resolution will result in a much larger image,
which,  depending  upon  the  monitor’s  settings,  may  not  be
completely visible on the viewer’s screen; conversely, an image
captured at a lower resolution than that at which it is displayed will
appear smaller. The end-users’ likely technology platform should be
the standard, to ensure that graphics will be viewed as intended.
Online users should always be advised about which settings are
optimal.
154
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
Online static visual displays which draw upon established design
principles, including those listed below (Dwyer, in Szabo, 1998, 
p. 20), are more likely to be successful.
• Visuals that emphasize the critical details relevant to learning
are  most  effective.  Unnecessary  visuals  may  be  distracting,
especially to learners with limited attention spans or discrimina-
tion skills.
• The addition of detail and realism to displays does not increase
learning. Unnecessary detail can add to learning time without
increasing achievement, and in online situations can increase
transfer times dramatically. Depending on the relevance of the
cues to  the learning task,  simple line drawings  tend to be
superior to photographs or more realistic drawings.
•  Winn (in Szabo, 1998, p. 21) cautions that diagrams, charts, and
graphs should not be assumed to be self-explanatory, but may
require the learner to process the information given and to
understand  certain  conventions.  He  suggests  that  graphics
should routinely include supporting captions.
With the exception of instruction that directly employs color for
teaching  (e.g.,  identifying  color-coded  elements), there  is  little
evidence that color enhances learning. Color may even distract
some learners (Dwyer, 1970, in Szabo, 1998, p. 27). Some other
generalizations about  color are  given  below  (Dwyer,  1970, in
Szabo, 1998, pp. 27-28). 
• Color may increase the speed at which lists can be searched. 
• The use of too many colors may reduce the legibility of a
presentation. A maximum of four colors was suggested in one
study, but up to eleven colors in screen displays were found to
be acceptable in another.
• The  most highly recommended colors are  vivid  versions of
green, cyan, white, and yellow. 
• The heavy use of color may degrade performance of some older
microcomputers and monitors, or may be displayed differently
on various systems.
Based on his review of the data, Szabo (1998) concluded that
“The disparity between effectiveness and perceived effectiveness is
nowhere as great as it is in the realm of color” (p. 27).
155
Media Characteristics and Online Learning Technology
Some further advice on the use of color in media production is
presented below (Rockley, 1997).
• End-users  should  control  the  color  of  displays,  given  the
prevalence of color-blindness (found to some degree in 8% of
men and 0.5% of women).
• The best color display combinations are blue, black, or red on a
white  background,  or  white,  yellow,  or  green  on  a  black
background.
For online uses of still graphics, the following characteristics of
the computer as a delivery medium must be accommodated by
developers (Rockley, 1997).
• A 
PC
screen is about 1/3 of a piece of paper in display area, and
most monitors are less sharp than the best laser printers or
photographic  reproductions.  Screen  positioning  is  critical:
important information should go to the top-left; the lower-left is
the least noticed area of the page/screen. What works on paper
may not work, without translation or redesign, on a computer
screen.  (Designers  should  not  assume  users  have  superior
equipment; design should be for displays of mid-range quality
and size.)
• Single-color backgrounds, with a high contrast ratio between
the background and the text, are easiest for readers; white or
off-white is best for the background. 
• Textured backgrounds display differently on various systems,
and should be used with care, if at all.
• Sans serif fonts, with mixed upper and lower case, are best for
legibility and reading ease. 
• The size of the font depends on the purpose. For extended
reading, smaller (12-point) fonts are suitable; for presenting
information that will be skimmed or scanned, larger fonts may
be more appropriate. 
• Font changes can be effective for emphasis (size and type), as
can capitals, underlining, and especially the use of bolding. The
use of color alone should be avoided for emphasis, as systems
handle color differently. All of the above techniques should be
used sparingly, to preserve their impact.
156
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
Sound and Mus
i
The principal issues in online audio are technical (storage and
bandwidth) and pedagogical. For maximum effect, materials must
not simply be a recorded version of  another  medium (e.g., a
lecture), but should be rescripted to incorporate and interrelate
with other modes of presentation (Koumi, 1994). 
Online audio (including, when file sizes are large, distribution by
CD
and 
DVD
) can be particularly useful in teaching for several
technical reasons, presented below.
• An audio summary of previous material can aid recall, help
retention,  and  lead  to  concept  formation  and  higher-order
thinking.
• Although 
CD
 and 
DVD
 are  one-way  technologies  (non-
interactive, like a lecture), they have the great advantage of
learner control.
CD
s and 
DVD
s are easy and cheap to produce and ship, and so
reduce cost and improve accessibility.
• The technology of discs is easy to use and familiar. Operating
systems (Windows, Apple 
OS
, and Linux) now usually offer
built-in sound reproduction technologies for both streamed and
static sound files.
• The mode of presentation most often found on this medium, the
human voice, is a familiar and powerful teaching tool.
• Audio may be more motivating than print alone, and together
with print may form a powerful alternative and aid to reading
alone (Newby et al., 2000).
A key issue in selecting a mix of other technologies to be used
with audioconferencing is the relative importance of relationship
building vs. information e
x
change.Picard (1999) sees audioconfer-
encing
'
s key contribution in its ability to promote relationship
building in work or learning. The need for other technologies,
according to Picard, is dependent upon the degree to which there is
also a need to exchange information (for which, she warns, audio
is not particularly effective). The schema presented in Figure 6-3
emerges from Picard
'
s analysis.
157
Media Characteristics and Online Learning Technology
In  Picard’s  (1999)  analysis,  when  relationship  building  and
information exchange needs are both low, audioconferencing alone
may  suffice.  When  both  needs  are  high,  however,  audio-
conferencing, video, and data (including text) should all be present.
Relationship  building  can  be  enhanced  by  combining  audio-
conferencing and video together with data, especially text. (Text has
formidable relationship building capabilities, as anyone who has
ever had a pen-pal knows, but it assumes considerable skill on the
user’s part.) Video increases the likelihood that interaction will
promote relationships, but audio alone is less capable of promoting
this outcome. Data exchange alone seems to do little to promote
relationships among those with access to other forms of interaction.
As technological evolutions permit more audio-based delivery,
both interactive (e.g., 
VoIP
) and one-way (streaming audio clips),
research  findings  about  audio’s  teaching  capabilities  become
applicable (Szabo, 1997, 1998).
• Learning gains from one-way audio alone are at best weak.
• Learners possessing higher verbal skills usually do not benefit
from audio added to text.
158
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
Figure 6-3.
Association of
audioconferencing,
data, and video with
information exchange
and relationship
building objectives. 
Information exchange
Audio + data
Audio + video
(high)
(low)
Audio only
Audio + data + video
Relationship building
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested