• sequences activities;
• evaluates instruction;
• arranges technical production and services;
• usually acts as project manager;
• acts as editor; and
• acts as Web developer.
Web Deve
l
oper
It is one of the challenges of the Web course designer to help create
an atmosphere of confidence in the process in the early stages of
development. Web developers should show faculty examples of
online materials that illustrate the various kinds of content and
interactive options that are available to them. They should then
describe to faculty how their courses can be produced using a
consistent organizational  template  that  provides  students  with
knowledge of the learning objectives, an outline of the content,
assignments,  evaluation information,  resources,  links,  a  list of
requirements, and 
FAQ
s. An example of such a template is
available  at  http://teleeducation.nb.ca/content/eastwest/template
(TeleEducation, 1997-2003).
Other roles of the Web developer include
• helping the 
SME 
or instructor to use the tools to create the
course Web pages, and to maintain the course when complete;
• helping the instructor or tutor to use the tools needed to make
the course interactive, such as e-mail and chat utilities;
• working with the graphic designer to conceptualize the screens,
backgrounds, buttons, window frames, and text elements in the
program;
• creating interactivity, and determining the “look and feel” of the
interface; and 
• creating design storyboards.
189
The Development of Online Courses
Pdf delete page - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete blank page in pdf; delete page pdf acrobat reader
Pdf delete page - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from a pdf reader; delete page in pdf
In a small production group, the Web developer may act as the
graphic designer, photographer, and director, and as the editor of
video, audio, and animations. In a larger group, the Web developer
would consult with other team members for the additional aspects
of the program; for example, collaborating with the sound designer
on the music, or working with the programmer on functionality
issues.
Graph
i
(
V
i
sua
l)
Des
i
gner
Visual design for Athabasca University courses, whether print-
based or electronic, is driven by the needs of students and
academics, and by the content of the course itself. Course
materials can be enhanced for distance education by including
technical drawings, illustrations, graphics, and photography to
interpret course content . . . . Visual design for electronic
courses or optional electronic enhancements of print-based
courses includes the development and creation of generic or
cus-tomized templates, navigational icons, icons or images to
aid recognition of location within a non-linear presentation of
materials, and visuals or graphics to enhance textual content.
(Athabasca University, 2002b)
The World Wide Web has turned the Internet into a compelling
visual medium; however, in production terms, good visual design
and development can often consume the largest amount of time in
a project. As the Web allows educational media to rely more and
more on visuals, the importance of clear visual design cannot be
overstated. The visuals that students, especially those new to online
learning, encounter in an online course can often set the tone for
their entire learning experience. 
As content is being developed, the graphic designer works with
the Web developer and the author to create a unique course look,
while at the same time integrating the course’s functionality into the
common institutional template. The use of these common elements
provides familiarity for online students and makes it possible for
them to take several courses, but to learn how to learn online only
once. The graphic designer also ensures that faculty will have
190
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete page from pdf; delete pages pdf online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
delete a page from a pdf in preview; delete page from pdf preview
continuing support in designing consistent graphical elements when
courses are being updated or revised. 
For graphic designers, Adobe Photoshop
®
has been the “must-
have” software tool for years. For those developing specifically for
online delivery, Photoshop has added an adjunct application, called
ImageReady
®
, that formats images for the Web. Other applications
that are becoming more important in the visual designer’s stable are
those that create vector-based images (as opposed to bitmaps);
examples include Adobe Illustrator
®
and Macromedia Freehand
®
.
Programmer and Mu
l
t
i
med
i
a Author
The  programmer is  responsible for program functionality.  The
programmer uses specialized software tools to enable the inter-
activity that is suggested and desired in online courses. In the most
productive teams, programming is treated as a highly specialized
and separate discipline. 
There are many software applications available to programmers,
and each  programmer  seems  to have  a  favorite  working  tool.
Programmers  should  endeavor  to  provide  development  team
members with a basic understanding of the classes of programming
tools and their capabilities. Generally, there are two classes of these
tools:  code-based  programming  languages,  and  graphical-user-
interfaced (
GUI
) authoring programs. The code-based languages
require that programmers use a proprietary computer language to
create applications that can then be delivered over the Internet. For
example, these languages enable the processing of information users
supply on Web-based forms. 
GUI
authoring programs may enable
similar processes, but they also offer some automated generation of
computer code. This chapter is not meant to be a comparison of
these tools—there are hundreds of articles about that—but currently
there does seem to be a clear line between the followers of code-
based programming techniques and those who prefer 
GUI
appli-
cations. One clear advantage of code-based programming is that
these tools are often open source; that is, they are created from
freely available, stable code that encourages collaborative develop-
ment. Commercial 
GUI 
software often requires less technical exper-
tise to use than code programming, but it can be expensive, and the
191
The Development of Online Courses
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Professional .NET PDF control for inserting PDF page in Visual Basic .NET class application.
delete pages in pdf; delete page pdf file reader
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
add and remove pages from pdf file online; add and delete pages in pdf online
companies who publish these proprietary software programs update
them  often,  rendering  earlier  versions  obsolete  and  constantly
forcing developers who rely on them to purchase new versions.
Below is a partial list of the types of applications that program-
mers typically work with in a Web-based course.
Open-source code-based programming languages include 
• Hypertext markup language (
HTML
)
• Java
• Javascript
• Perl
• Extensible markup language (
XML
)
PHP
MySQL
Proprietary 
GUI
Web-development software packages include
• Macromedia Dreamweaver
®
, Flash
®
, Director
®
, Authorware
®
• Microsoft 
.NET
®
, Visual Basic
®
• Adobe GoLive
®
, Photoshop
®
, Illustrator
®
Conc
l
us
i
on
Developing effective instructional materials depends on a great deal
of planning and collaboration, and concerted efforts from many
people skilled at using the right tools. These requirements are even
more crucial in online multimedia and course development, which
is highly dependent on ever-changing computer technologies. 
Pedagogical standards must not be compromised, regardless of
the instructional medium employed. Employing the principles and
guidelines offered in this chapter will help all stakeholders involved
in online instructional development to ensure that their efforts are
rewarded, ultimately, with satisfied learners. 
192
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; Delete image objects in selected PDF page in ASPX webpage.
delete page in pdf document; copy page from pdf
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET: Delete a Character in PDF Page. It demonstrates how to delete a character in the first page of sample PDF file with the location of (123F, 187F).
delete pages from a pdf online; delete pdf pages online
R
e
f
erences
Athabasca University (2002a). 
MKTG
406 demo. Athabasca, 
AB
:
Athabasca  University. Retrieved July  15,  2003,  from  http://
eclass.athabascau.ca/eclass/Demoec.nsf
Athabasca  University  (2002b). Visual design.  Athabasca, 
AB
:
Athabasca University. Retrieved July 15, 2003, from http://emd
.athabascau.ca/html/visualdesign.html
British  Broadcasting  Corporation.  (2002-2003). History
multimedia zone. London: British Broadcasting Corporation.
Retrieved  July  15, 2003,  from  http://www.bbc.co.uk/history
/multimedia_zone
Chickering, A., 
&
Ehrmann, S. (1996). Implementing the seven
principles:  Technology  as  lever. American Association for
Higher Education Bulletin 49(2), 3-6. Retrieved July 15, 2003,
from http://www.tltgroup.org/programs/seven.html
Chickering, A., 
&
Gamson, Z. (1987). Seven principles for good
practice in undergraduate education. American Association for
Higher Education Bulletin, 39(7), 3-7 Retrieved July 15, 2003,
from  http://www.aahebulletin.com/public/archive/sevenprinci
ples1987.asp
Elliott, M., 
&
McGreal, R. (2002). Learning on the Web, 2002
edition.Fredericton, 
NB
: TeleEducation 
NB
. Retrieved July 16,
2003,  from  http://teleeducation.nb.ca/content/pdf/english/lotw
2002.pdf
Fox, M., 
&
Helford,  P. (1999).  Northern  Arizona  University:
Advancing the boundaries of higher education in Arizona using
the World Wide Web. Interactive Learning Environments, 7(2-
3), 155-174.
Graham, C., Cagiltay, K., Lim, B., Craner, J., 
&
Duffy, T. (2001,
March/April). Seven principles of effective teaching: A practical
lens for evaluating online courses. Technology Source. Retrieved
July  16,  2003, from http://sln.suny.edu/sln/public/original.nsf
/dd93a8da0b7ccce0852567b00054e2b6/b495223246cabd6b85
256a090058ab98?OpenDocument
Longmire,  W.  (2000,  March).  A  primer  on  learning  objects.
Learning Circuits. Retrieved July 16, 2003, from http://www
.learningcircuits.org/mar2000/primer.html
193
The Development of Online Courses
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
C#.NET Sample Code: Delete Text from Specified PDF Page. The following demo code will show how to delete text in specified PDF page. // Open a document.
delete pages on pdf online; delete pages on pdf file
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
document. If you find certain page in your PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page directly. Moreover, when
reader extract pages from pdf; delete pages out of a pdf
National Geographic Society. (1996-2003). National Geographic
Kids.com. Washington, 
DC
 National  Geographic  Society.
Retrieved July 15, 2003, from http://www.nationalgeographic
.com/kids
Russell, T. (1999). The no significant difference phenomenon.
Raleigh, 
NC
 Office  of  Instructional  Telecommunications,
North Carolina State University.
Seels, B., 
&
Glasgow,  Z.  (1998). Ma
k
ing  instructional design
decisions(2d ed.). Upper Saddle River, 
NJ
: Merrill.
TeleEducation 
NB
. (1997-2003). TeleEducation 
NB
Online Course
Template. Fredericton, 
NB
NB
Distance  Education  Inc.
Retrieved July 16, 2003, from http://teleeducation.nb.ca/content
/eastwest/template
Western  Interstate  Commission  for  Higher  Education  (1999).
Principles of good practice for electronically offered academic
degree and certificate programs. [Online]. Retrieved July 16,
2003,  from  http://www.wcet.info/projects/balancing/principles
.htm
194
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
C H A P T E R   8
D
E
V
EL
OP
I
NG T
E
AM S
KILL
S AND
ACCOMP
LI
SH
I
NG T
E
AM P
R
OJ
E
CTS ON
LI
N
E
Deborah C. Hurst & Janice Thomas
Centre for Innovative Management
Athabasca University
I
ntroduct
i
on
Traditionally,  the  primary  weakness  attributed  to  distance
education at the 
MBA
or professional education level has been in
the teaching of team or leadership aspects of the curriculum. Some
academics question the suitability of a topic such as team dynamics
and communications as a candidate for online learning, believing
that this aspect of the curriculum cannot be adequately taught
through distance means. Clearly, a lot of what occurs in typical
team  training  programs involves experiential  forms  of  human
interaction, conflict resolution, goal setting, and so on. Questions
remain regarding the ability to develop “soft” skills online.
In this chapter,  we  present our  experience in teaching and
encouraging the exercise of soft team skills in a online environ-
ment. Three examples of online team training and team skills
practice are illustrated. These case examples exemplify what is
possible with respect to developing knowledge of team dynamics
and communications, and accomplishing team project work in an
online environment. The paper begins with an online application of
teaching team concepts at a distance to mid-career professionals. In
describing aspects of the team dynamics module, we highlight the
unique value and capabilities of an online learning environment. 
The  second part  of the paper elaborates  ideas about  online
learning and working introduced in the first case example through
two  additional  examples.  Case  2  examines  the  operation  and
characteristics of a highly successful online project team, and Case 3
presents some collected experiences from 
MBA
-level online learning
teams. We then synthesize lessons learned from all three cases. We
highlight  key  benefits  gained  through  structured  interaction
195
incorporating  solid  project  management and  team development
practices—specifically, gaining agreement  on  how  members  will
work together, assign  accountability,  manage flexibility, monitor
progress, and incorporate social interaction. These, we believe, are
the key ingredients for successful online teaming in learning (or any
other) environments. 
Two key ingredients emphasized throughout the discussion of
successful online and distance teaming are technology and trust.
We make some summary comments on the impact and role of these
two concepts, and conclude with some practical recommendations
about managing online learning teams. 
Ultimately, we are interested in challenging perceived barriers
surrounding the ability of online learning to contribute to soft skill
and competency development. It is our view that this method of
team development is not only effective in developing competency in
soft skills and social interaction, but that online learning may in
fact be the superior method. We hope that our evidence of what is
possible in an online learning environment provides some specific
practical  guidance  on  what  it  takes  to  accomplish  team
development and project work online.
Deve
l
op
i
ng Team Sk
ill
s On
li
ne
In this section of the chapter, we describe an example of a leading-
edge team development training program delivered online and at a
distance. Our purpose in emphasizing this module is to provide
concrete evidence of how one institution provides soft skill training
online.
The  module  described herein is part of an overall package
owned by the Canadian Professional Logistics Institute (
CPLI
),
created  in  response  to  increasing  development  needs  of  the
emerging professionals within the logistics field.
1
The 
CPLI 
decided
to combine face-to-face with online learning methods within their
program. Modules delivered  online include the topics  of team
dynamics,  integrated  logistics  networks,  and  logistics  process
diagnosis. Modules delivered in a face-to-face format include the
topics of leading and managing change, supply chain strategies,
ethics, and  leadership. The 
CPLI
program blends the different
learning methods  in  a  unique way  to  develop  soft  and hard
196
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
1
Dr. Hurst worked with a
team invited by the 
CPLI 
to
develop learning modules
for their “millennium
project,” a professional
learning program. The
invitation was based on
her research interests and
previous experience in the
logistics field. The team
dynamics and communi-
cations module was
developed as a two-part
learning program, the first
part an individual experi-
ence of a virtual reality
simulation intended to
allow the participant to
“learn about” concepts in
a simulated team, and the
second part an online
learning environment via
the Internet allowing the
participant to “learn how
to” participate in a online
team with other real
participants. The real 
team sessions are facili-
tated while students work
through and apply
concepts. This module is
facilitated, evaluated, and
revised on an ongoing
basis by Dr. Hurst. The
experiences described
here are used with the
permission of the
Canadian Professional
Logistics Institute.
practical skills and understanding (with a heavier emphasis on soft
skills than is typically provided in this field), as well as tacit insight,
competence, trust, and confidence in a online collaborative process
for learning and working. 
We  refer  here  to  the  team  dynamics  and  communications
module that is delivered online. The module materials are quite like
those delivered in a face-to-face context. Learners build on insights
and ideas taken from Katzenbach and Smith (1999), among others,
to develop key success indicators of teams. However, the online
delivery method is very different, in that people connect only
through  information  technology  and  do  not  meet face-to-face
during the module. They do however, meet face-to-face in other
modules, usually after they have completed the team dynamics
module.  The online  learning  environment  allows  users to  get
beyond the significant challenges of cost, time, and risk imposed by
more  traditional  forms  of  corporate  training  and  university
teaching designed to provide experiential learning to employees or
students.
This particular module uses technology in two ways to support
learning. The  module is six weeks in  duration, split into  two
phases. Phase 1 is made up of a stand-alone 
CD
-based virtual
reality simulation that each student completes independently. The
second  phase  involves  student  interaction  that  is  facilitated
technologically, through asynchronous and synchronous tools. A
human facilitator also working from a distance guides participant
interactions  by  asking  questions  and  making  suggestions
throughout the module. We explore the value of both the virtual
reality  simulation  and  the  online  team  work  that  follows  in
providing “teachable moments” from which learning—both tacit
and explicit—is derived.
The Team Dynam
i
cs and Commun
i
cat
i
ons 
(
TDC
)
Modu
l
e—Phase 1
The  first  part  of  the 
TDC
module  has  learners  engage  in
experiential individual learning though a simulation containing
scenarios of typical team challenges. The learner is expected to
interact with simulated team members (filmed scenarios and pre-
recorded graphics) on a time-sensitive, critical mission, to gather
197
Developing Team S
k
ills and Accomplishing Team Projects Online 
information, and to experience team and team-relevant issues as
they progress through the various scenarios. Overall, the 
TDC
simulation focuses on skills needed for effective team dynamics and
“online  teaming”:  team  process  discussions,  role  assignments,
leadership, conflict resolution, decision making, and planning for
goal success. Many of the scenarios crafted were taken from real
experiences  that  highlighted  the  most  salient  issues  of  team
development.  Information  on  how  different  people  store
information and label organizational stories was used to construct
the decision paths in each scene of the scenarios. Cultural ideas
around probable failures and interpretations of these failures were
used to inform the scripting. The resulting scenarios were dramatic
and interesting, and encouraged participation.
The setting for the virtual reality simulation is a remote area
where  lightning  has  started  a  forest  fire  and  damaged  a
telecommunications tower. The learner enters the online space and
becomes part of an emergency response team that has been given
the responsibility of repairing the tower. To ensure some team
struggle at this stage of learning, participants are required to deal
online  with  the  challenges  of  travel  by  canoe,  arriving,  and
completing the mission within a set period of time. If the team
functions poorly on the tasks and arrives late, the consequence
presented is that telecommunications in the area will go down, and
firefighters  will  not  be  able  to  prevent  the  forest  fire  from
approaching a small nearby town. Every decision that learners
make  is  shown  to  have  immediate  consequences  within  the
simulated world, and collectively they convey the risk of failure. 
Teachab
l
e Moments
Although a  learner’s poor  decision or mistake may have only
caused the team to lose time on the trip, mistakes create important
“teachable moments.”
2
Failure on any task is considered to be an
opportunity to learn by determining  “what  went  wrong.” To
facilitate  learning at  these moments,  an online coach  pops up
within the simulated environment to provide just-in-time positive
and negative feedback, depending on the learner’s decisions. The
learner therefore immediately faces their mistakes, and is able to
learn from them in a private and safe environment. 
198
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
2
“Teachable moment” 
is defined as the precise
point at which a learner
makes a mistake and
wants to correct it, or to
learn alternative infor-
mation with which to
interpret questions or
responses. It is a brief
window where the learner
is most receptive to new
information that is
focused, personalized, 
and in context. Schank
(1997) adds to our
understanding of the
teachable moment by
suggesting that, once a
learner makes a mistake,
they are emotionally
aroused. If the error 
occurs publicly, the
individual will close off, 
as a result of embar-
rassment; however, if 
such failure is private, the
learner at that moment is
most receptive to new
information and learning.
The teachable moment
often begins with a
question and has much 
to do with an individual’s
personal curiosity (see
Bennett, 2000).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested