c# open pdf file in adobe reader : Delete pages pdf preview Library SDK class asp.net wpf windows ajax TPOL_book25-part1534

learning and the functioning of the teams. Finally, developing a
supportive culture through instilling beliefs, values, and processes
that facilitate open communication, support, and trust is important
in realizing learning and teaming in this environment. Each of these
themes is briefly explored in closing.
Techno
l
ogy as 
E
nab
l
er
Technology plays two important roles in the online learning or
teaming experience.
1. Apprehension  and  preconceived  notions  about  technology-
mediated discussion caused problems in getting teams started, as
evidenced in the team module and reaffirmed in every run of the
MBA
courses.
2. Technology failure in online teams could be 
a. a convenient excuse: “I didn’t get that note”; “I couldn’t partici-
pate in the teamwork because my computer hard drive crashed.”
b. a significant frustration. In an eight-week course, having your
hard drive go can take you down for a significant portion of the
course, and make it very difficult to carry your end of the team
commitment.
The 
R
o
l
e o
f
Trust
With respect to trust, there is one further distinction that we would
like to raise between online and traditional teams. This distinction
lies in the nature of the situational awareness. It has been suggested
that online teams function on an intentional awareness, because
only specific characteristics of suitable resources or providers may
be known (Chen, 1997). Situational awareness for online teams is
contrasted to the extensional awareness more likely in face-to-face
teams, where the specific resources or providers are known. This
different kind of awareness of the resources plays a big role in how
the team becomes an entity, as well as in how it will weave together
its skills sets, and in the process build trust.
It is our view that the level of trust among participants (perhaps
from having members who had worked on other teams together, or
219
Developing Team S
k
ills and Accomplishing Team Projects Online 
Delete pages pdf preview - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page numbers in pdf; acrobat export pages from pdf
Delete pages pdf preview - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page on pdf document; cut pages out of pdf
from a shared level of trust in the experience through the culture of
the program, or as a result of trust in the coach) determines how
well people work together and how seriously the charter is taken.
It is clear to the team members of the online research team that they
would have been hard pressed to continue working together if they
did not have a strong desire to do so, and trust in the other team
member’s  abilities.  Thus  trust  in  competence,  contract,
commitment (Reina 
&
Reina, 1999), and character (Marshall,
2000) all play a significant role in the initial stages of online team
development.
Weick (1996) suggests that people organize cooperatively on
teams in order to  learn  and complete their  work.  There  is a
continuous mix of agency and communion that creates a shared
reciprocity between individuals and that benefits both learning and
team function. However, as highlighted in this chapter, trust is
required for meaningful cooperation, and is often missing in the
early stages of relationship building. 
The development of trust in online teams is not nor can it be a
quick and easy task. There is a need to look behind apprehension
and fear to listen to and capture an individual’s heart before trust
can follow. There is an interesting paradox when considering trust.
On the one hand, we see that a team must be productive quickly,
and that individuals need to trust and to be trusted within the team.
But on the other hand, few people on teams or in any relationship
will trust immediately. Team members thrown together will more
likely distrust the motives of others at the outset. This human truth
has  implications  for  development,  early  sharing  of  personal
information, and hence, charter development, as found in our three
cases. The cases also highlight the distance people will go when
they do trust, and how reluctant they are to let go of team members
once a trusting relationship is in place. Social interaction and trust
therefore are key in any team and learning process. Once team
members trust, they are more likely to make their tacit knowledge
explicit, transform explicit knowledge into tacit knowledge, and in
the process, enlarge overall understanding.
We obviously need to know more about how to discern trust
levels early, and about what we can do to build them rapidly.
Examples of factors that heavily weight our decisions to trust other
people include the degree of leeway or freedom to act without
controls  in  place,  the  level  of  benevolence,  the  evidence  of
220
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net.
delete page in pdf reader; cut pages from pdf online
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net.
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; delete pdf pages in reader
openness, and the degree of risk taking. When a high level of trust
exists, fewer rules or controls appear necessary. Obviously, trust is
a tricky concept and a necessary consideration in online teaming. If
we can invoke a culture and process that encourages rapid develop-
ment of such assessments, we should be able to encourage rapid
trust building which can only facilitate our learning and teaming
processes.
The 
I
mportance o
fL
earn
i
ng and Team
i
ng Cu
l
ture
Another point highlighted by our discussion of trust, trust building,
and implications for team performance is how we might create or
transform a culture to allow meaningful, trusting relationships to
develop. Marshall (2000, p. 66) states that 
to create a truly customer-driven, team-based, and trust-
centered organization . . . would require a fundamental change 
in the organization system . . . new technologies would not fix
it . . . training programs [alone] could not make it happen . . . 
restructuring into teams by itself would not meet the need. 
Instead, transforming a business requires that we transform the
way work is accomplished and the culture within which it occurs.
A new approach would be relationship based, and would support
an  agreement  or  covenant  between  management  and  others,
spelling out understandings of trade-offs between risk, skill, labor,
and rewards, and delineating the way people will treat each other.
The covenant would frame character, quality, and integrity in the
work  relationship,  and would  reflect underlying  beliefs  about
human nature, drivers of the business, and how management and
other actors in the workplace will change.
Project management practices may provide tools for developing
a culture of trust, accountability, and transparency conducive to
rapid trust development. The importance of establishing a team
charter early on to focus the team is only one example of the
importance of engineering the culture of teams. The establishment
of the team charter and acknowledgement of culture was shown to
be important in our three cases, as in each case, team members
ignored this fact until faced with situations of conflict.
221
Developing Team S
k
ills and Accomplishing Team Projects Online 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
a preview component enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Delete unimportant contents:
delete page from pdf file online; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Erase PDF images. • Erase PDF pages. Miscellaneous. • Select PDF text on viewer. • Search PDF text in preview. • View PDF outlines. Related Resources.
delete page from pdf online; delete page from pdf acrobat
Conc
l
us
i
on
This chapter sheds light on some of the controversies associated
with  teaching  teaming  and  using  online  teaming  in  distance
education programs by providing some insights into the operations
of a team-building distance simulation, a successful online project
team, and the use of teams in a distance-based 
MBA
program. Our
experience in these and other online team teaching and working
situations  convince  us  that  these  skills  are  teachable  and
transferable in a online world.
In multiple runs of the team-learning module, we have found the
virtual reality simulation to be a very effective way to introduce the
concepts of teamwork. Followed up with teamwork in an online
facilitated setting, it appears to be developing understanding and
soft skills in this new online environment. 
Over the nearly ten-year history of the distance
MBA 
programs
at  Athabasca  University,  and  particularly  within  the  project
management  course,  we  have  witnessed  similar  results.  Our
students develop not only an explicit understanding of online team
dynamics, but also tacit skills in making it happen. One of the
primary  skills  developed  in  traditional 
MBA
programs  is
networking and oral presentation of information. In our program,
we work on these skills too, but the main skills our students
develop as a result of the program are the ability to share infor-
mation, insights, and criticism over the Web, and to build and work
very effectively on online teams. 
The biggest problem in any team undertaking is the assumption
that you can put people together to work on a task, and they will
automatically become a team and know how to work together.
This assumption is equally false in both the face-to-face and the
online team contexts. In the online world, it may be even easier to
ignore the human process side of team work in the absence of
physical clues revealing the psychic health (or lack of) of the team.
The trick is to put the effort into the process side of teaming and
teaching, even  when  it is less  visible than  in  the face-to-face
environment. We reiterate, however, that it can and must be done.
Project team learning in an online world has become a fact of
life at work and in our education settings. The experience from the
three  cases  presented  provides  some  suggestions  for  how  to
approach this activity in a learning or work setting.
222
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pages from pdf in reader; delete pdf page acrobat
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Excel. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Excel file in C#.net.
best pdf editor delete pages; delete pages from pdf acrobat reader
R
ecommendat
i
ons
Effective teamwork requires continual monitoring and assessment.
Effective  teaching does  the  same.  The recommendations  given
below may facilitate online teaming and learning endeavors.
• Work hard in the beginning to develop a trusting environment.
Without it nothing will work. Trust builds as relationships build
in online teaming, and therefore must be present in online team
development. 
• Expect shifting of roles and leadership. Sometimes the teacher
will be the taught and the leader must learn to follow.
• Employ as many forms of interaction as possible in the initial
phases of the collaboration. If possible, face-to-face is probably
the ideal way to kick off. However, most of us do not have this
luxury, and there is growing evidence about and experience with
online kick-offs, such as the learning module discussed above. 
• Open  communication  is  critical  to  any  team  endeavor.
Determining how to encourage it in your particular online world
is your most critical task.
• Employ good project management practices. Agree how you will
work together. Plan the work. Assign responsibility. Monitor
progress. Celebrate success.
R
e
f
erences
Aranda, E. K., Aranda, L., & Conlon, K. (1998). Teams: Structure,
process, culture and politics. Upper Saddle River, 
NJ
: Prentice
Hall.
Bennett, C. (2000, Winter). Capturing the teachable moment: In-
house staff development. Oregon Library Association Quarterly,
5(4). Retrieved October 18, 2003, from http://www.olaweb.org/
quarterly/quar5-4/bennett.shtml
Burt, R. (Ed.). (1993). The social structure of competition in
networ
k
s and organizations. Boston, 
MA
: Harvard Business
School Press.
223
Developing Team S
k
ills and Accomplishing Team Projects Online 
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
add and remove pages from a pdf; delete pages from pdf online
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
delete blank pages in pdf; delete pages from pdf acrobat
Canadian Professional Logistics Institute (2000). Team dynamics
and communications module. Toronto, 
ON
: Author. 
Chen, L. L.-J. (1997). Modeling the Internet as cyberorganism: A
living systems framewor
k
and investigative methodologies for
online  cooperative  interaction. Unpublished doctoral disser-
tation. University of Calgary.
Delisle, C., Thomas, J., Jugdev, K., 
&
Buckle, P. (2001, November).
Virtual project teaming to bridge the distance: A case study.
Paper  presented  at  the  32nd  annual  Project  Management
Institute Seminars 
&
Symposium, Nashville, Tennessee.
Eccles, R. G., 
&
Crane, D. B. (1987). Managing through networks
in investment banking. California Management Review 30(1),
176-195.
Glaser, R., 
&
Glaser, C. (1992). Team effectiveness profile. King of
Prussia,
PA
: Organizational Design and Development, Inc.
Gristock, J. (1997). Communications and organizational virtuality.
E-Jov. The Electronic Journal of Organization Virtualness, 2(2),
9-14.
Hartman, F. (2000). Don’t par
k
your brain outside. Philadelphia:
PMI
Publications.
Hogan, C., 
&
Champagne, D. (1980). Personal style inventory: 
PSI
instrument. King of Prussia, 
PA
: Organizational Design and
Development, Inc. 
Hurst,  D., 
&
Follows,  S.  (2003).  Virtual  team  development:
building intellectual capital and cultural value change. In 
M. Beyerlein (Ed.), The collaborative wor
k
systems fieldboo
k
.
(pp. 543-560). Denton, 
TX
: University of North Texas.
Katzenbach, J. R., 
&
Smith, D. K. (1999). The wisdom of teams:
Creating the high-performance organization. New York: Harper
Collins. 
Lipnack, J., 
&
Stamps, J. (1997). Virtual teams: Reaching across
space, time, and organizations with technology(2nd ed.). New
York: Wiley.
Marshall, E. M. (2000). Building trust at the speed of change: The
power of the relationship-based corporation.New York: Amer-
ican Management Association.
Miller, P., Pons, J. M., 
&
Naude, P. (1996, June 14). Global teams.
Financial Times,12
224
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in ASP.NET. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
delete blank page in pdf online; delete page from pdf file
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from PowerPoint in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
delete pages from pdf in reader; delete page in pdf preview
Palmer, J. W., 
&
Johnston, J. S. (1996, December). Business-to-
business connectivity on the Internet: 
EDI
, intermediaries, and
interorganizational dimensions. In A. Rainer, B. F. Schmid, 
D. Selz, 
&
S. Zbornik. 
EM
—Interorganizational Systems. 
EM
Electronic Mar
k
ets, 6(2). Retrieved December 22, 2003, from
http://www.informationobjects.ch:8080/NetAcademy/naservice/
publications.nsf/all_pk/74
Ribble Libove, L., 
&
Russo, E. M. (1997). Trust—the ultimate test.
King of Prussia, 
PA
: Organizational Design and Development, Inc.
Reina D. S., 
&
Reina, M. L. (1999). Trust and betrayal in the
wor
k
place: Building effective relationships in your organization.
San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler.
Schank, R. (1997). Online learning: A revolutionary approach to
building a highly s
k
illed wor
k
force.New York: McGraw-Hill.
Stewart, A. (2001). The wealth of 
k
nowledge: Intellectual capital
and the twenty-first century organization.New York: Currency.
Walther,  B.  J.  (1996).  Computer-mediated  communication:
Impersonal,  interpersonal  and  hyperpersonal  interaction.
Communication Research, 23(1), 3-43.
Weick, K. E. (1982). Management of organizational change among
loosely coupled elements. In P. S. Goodman (Ed.), Change in
organizations:  New  perspectives  on  theory,  research  and
practice (pp. 375-408). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
Weick,  K.  (1996).  Enactment  and  the  boundaryless  career:
Organizing as we work. In M. B. Arthur & D. M. Rousseau
(Eds.), The boundaryless career: A new employment principle
for a new organizational era (pp. 40-57). New York: Oxford
University Press.
White, H. C., Boorman, S. A., 
&
Breiger, R. L. (1976). Social
structure from multiple networks I—block models of roles and
positions. American Journal of Sociology, 81(4), 730-780. 
225
Developing Team S
k
ills and Accomplishing Team Projects Online 
Append
i
x 8A: 
E
xamp
l
e o
f
CP
LI
Student Team Charter 
Model adapted from 
Aranda, E. K., Aranda, L. & Conlon, K. (1998) and
Katzenbach, J. R., & Smith, D. K. (1999) 
T
E
AM CHA
R
T
ER
Team Dynamics & Communication
Canadian Professional Logistics Institute Module
October 2003
Structure
Membership
• For the purpose of voting the team membership should consist
of an odd number of members (suggest 5 or 7 members).
• Members should be chosen from the various key departments
within the company (Upper Management, Logistics, Finance,
Information Technology, Engineering, Research and Develop-
ment, Sales and Marketing, etc.).
• Members  should  have  unique  roles  on  the  team  to  avoid
duplication of effort and responsibility.
Skill Mix
• Members should represent experts in their field from the various
key  departments  within  the  company  (Upper Management,
Logistics,  Finance,  Information  Technology,  Engineering,
Research and Development, Sales and Marketing, etc.).
• Members should have the skills, experience, and authority to
make necessary decisions, supply answers and provide direction
in time of crisis.
• All team members should have excellent leadership, communi-
cation, and listening skills. 
226
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
• Outside skilled support people and/or agencies should be added
and included as needed during the crisis/disaster. Examples of
support people  and  agencies  are Fire  Department,  Forestry
Department, Medical Agencies, Police, Military, Environmental
Agencies, others as required. 
Purpose
• Provide emergency services in the event of all natural disasters.
• Function analytically and provide alternative options for all
emergencies.
• Provide support to those on the front line, execute thoroughly,
safely, and quickly.
Assumptions
• Do not assume roles of responsibility. Define a roadmap of the
team’s  objectives  and  goals  and  each  team  member’s  role/
responsibility. 
• Clearly set guidelines on how we will conduct and display our
disagreements and that no decision is made unless the team
agrees (consensus of course).
• Clarify assumptions about teamwork—how they might interfere
and why it is important to clarify in a team’s structure. I.e. 
Dept. “X” contact Police, Fire, and Ambulance. Dept. “Y” 
contacts . . . Dept. “W” coordinates . . . 
• Recognize people will panic and thinking irrationally. Have
panic plan in place for various disasters.
• Assume the worst scenario and develop an action plan for the
most obvious change. I.e. Weather conditions.
Key Success Measures
• Take the necessary time to respond to tasks. Do not rush a
decision.
• Take measures to avoid a disaster.
• Establish a reaction time based on nature of disaster.
• Ensure teams know what, when, who, where and why in a
disaster. They know their place.
227
Developing Team S
k
ills and Accomplishing Team Projects Online 
• Ensure all teams prioritize their time and are available to react
to a disaster.
• Regular progress assessments should be maintained by the lead
for that disaster.
• A follow-up meeting or meetings will be established by the lead
for that disaster as required.
• During disaster situation try to avoid causing any disruption to
day-to-day operations as much as possible. Avoidance of down
time.
• There should always be a focus on avoiding any unnecessary
risk of injury or casualties.
• A situational report and structure shall be established by the
lead for that disaster.
• A measurable reaction time to a disaster should be established.
• A monthly report will include test scenarios by activity and
specific disaster.
• A monthly communication shall be distributed to each team for
up to date information and events.
• Ultimately no casualties.
KPI
’s (Key Performance Indicators)
• Reaction time
• Teams in place
• Available for action
• No down time
R & D Process
• Emergency Response Training for all areas to better understand
the nature of each disaster and action steps.
• Team leads will be established according to the nature of the
disaster.
• A measurable response time to each disaster shall be established.
• A  disaster  may  require  the  use  of  more  than  one  leader
depending on the nature of the disaster.
228
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested