c# open pdf file in adobe reader : Add or remove pages from pdf Library control component .net azure wpf mvc TPOL_book28-part1537

To encourage intellectual honesty, and to contribute to
education  on  plagiarism,  every  Athabasca  University  course
contains a notice like that shown in Figure 9-2, under the heading
“Intellectual Indebtedness and Plagiarism” (Athabasca University,
2002).
Pract
i
ca
l
Gu
i
de
li
nes
Co
ll
ect
i
ve 
Li
cens
i
ng
Collective licenses, such as those administered by Access Copyright
in Canada and the Copyright Clearance Center in the U.S., have
been helpful to post-secondary educational institutions. Collective
249
Copyright Issues in Online Courses: A Moment in Time
Figure 9-2. 
Intellectual
indebtedness 
and plagiarism
statement.
Students enrolled in an Athabasca University course such as
[course name] are considered to be responsible scholars, and
are therefore expected to adhere rigorously to the principles of
intellectual honesty. Plagiarism is a form of intellectual
dishonesty in which another’s work is presented as one’s own,
and, as is the case with any form of academic misconduct,
plagiarism will be severely penalized. Depending on the
circumstances, penalties may involve rejection of the submitted
work; expulsion from the examination, the course, or the
program; or legal action.
Students sometimes commit plagiarism inadvertently. To avoid
doing so, make certain that you acknowledge all your sources,
both primary and secondary, in a full and consistent manner.
All direct quotes (quotations from an original work) and indirect
quotes (paraphrases of ideas presented in an original work)
must be acknowledged either through in-text citations,
footnotes, or endnotes.
Whatever system of documentation you use, you must provide
the author’s name, the title of the work, the place of
publication, the publisher, the year of publication, and the page
number from which the quote or information was taken. Full
bibliographic information on each source cited must also be
given in the bibliography at the end of your essay.
9
The Web site of the
Canadian copyright
licensing agency, Access
Copyright, is given below.
Retrieved October 9,
2003. 
http://www.access
copyright.ca
Add or remove pages from pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages out of a pdf; delete pages pdf
Add or remove pages from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
cut pages from pdf reader; acrobat remove pages from pdf
licensing agencies work with creators to administer rights payments
for reproduction of creators’ work.
9
Users of collective licensing
agencies benefit from the “rights clearinghouse” effect of collective
licenses. That is, where certain rights are allowed, users pay per-
student  and  per-page  fees  to  reproduce  creators’  works.  The
collective then distributes collected funds to the copyright holders.
Collective licenses are only beginning to work for users wanting to
reproduce materials electronically, and such licensing arrangements
are not nearly as efficient as they have been for print reproduction.
At Athabasca  University,  more  than  two-thirds  of  print-based
reproduction occurs under a collective license, whereas nearly all
electronic  reproduction  rights are  negotiated  directly with  the
copyright holder. 
T
i
me
li
nes
Twenty  years  ago,  the  Athabasca  University  copyright  office
cleared rights to reprint third-party copyright holders’ material by
using the telephone, fax machine, and Canada Post. In a best-case
scenario, rights would be granted in about two weeks. The worst
case scenario occurred when the suspected copyright holder, who
could only be reached by regular mail, turned out not to be the
actual copyright holder, and other contacts had to be tried and
negotiated with. This process could and often did take a year.
Recently, for online courses and electronic reproduction, copyright
clearance turnaround timelines are similar to the print-based ranges
of the early 1980s (six months to a year), but current collective
licensing arrangements can make rights permission for print-based
reproduction instantaneous. With cooperating individual copyright
holders, print and some electronic-based permissions have been
hastened by the use of e-mail and online forms. For examples, see
the Web sites listed below.
• Thomson  Learning’s  site  at  http://www.thomsonrights.com/
permissions/action/begin
• Pearson  Education  Canada’s  online  form  at  http://www
.pearsoned.ca/highered/permission.html 
250
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
manipulations. Open password protected PDF. Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password. Remove password from PDF. Set PDF security level. VB
delete blank page in pdf; delete pages in pdf
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; // Remove the password. doc.Save(outputFilePath); C# Sample Code: Add Password to Plain PDF
delete pdf pages; delete a page from a pdf
• Public Works and Government Services Canada provides their
preferred  form  online  at  http://cgp-egc.gc.ca/copyright/
application-e.pdf 
• Ivey  School  of  Business  forms  can  be  found  under
“Permission/Order Forms” at http://www.ivey.uwo.ca/cases/cps
.asp?pvar=Main 
• Prentice Hall (Pearson U.S.) forms are at http://www.prenhall
.com/mischtm/permissions.html 
The (American) Copyright Clearance Center will grant electronic
rights to  Canadian  requesters on  behalf of  affiliated copyright
holders, and Canada’s Access Copyright is also now trying this
strategy as well.
Pub
li
c Doma
i
n
With the lack of an efficient mechanism for collective licensing for
electronic use of materials, the public domain becomes much more
important to online course creation and delivery. Materials in the
public domain are not subject to copyright restrictions. In Canada,
textual  material  automatically  enters  the  public  domain  on 
January 1 of the 51st year after the creator’s death. The situation is
different in the United States, which is currently debating the length
of  time  required  before  materials  enter  the  public  domain.
According to John Bloom (2002), the original term of copyright in
the U.S. was 14 years, with an added 14 years if the author were
still alive. Bloom goes on to note that
we have gradually lengthened that 14-year limit on copyrights.
At one time it was as much as 99 years, then scaled back to 75
years, then—in one of the most anti-American acts of the last
century—suspended entirely in 1998. The Sonny Bono
Copyright Term Extension Act of that year says simply that there
will be no copyright expirations for 20 years, meaning that
everything published between 1923 and 1943 will notbe
released into the public domain. (2002)
251
Copyright Issues in Online Courses: A Moment in Time
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing
delete page from pdf file online; delete page from pdf file
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing
delete blank page in pdf online; delete pages from a pdf reader
The maximum term of copyright in the United Kingdom is
currently  life  plus  70  years.  Canadian  federal  and  provincial
documents are also protected by copyright, with the 50-year rule
applying from the date of creation. 
Some online creators now place their work in the public domain
on creation. Using public domain material means that negotiating
rights is not necessary—material can be used as-is and immediately,
an attractive combination in online courses, where production time
is minimized (no printing, binding, collating, and shipping) and the
temptation is toward just-in-time creation. Note, however, that
materials in the public domain still require appropriate citation;
using them without acknowledgement constitutes plagiarism.
Scenar
i
os: On
li
ne Course Product
i
on
Case A:Professor Rush is working on a course that she expects will
be entirely online. Her course start date is in two months, and she
has just decided to add some online readings. Best practice dictates
that she check the online journal databases for these readings first.
Most university libraries now register with many online journal
database providers. Copyright on articles within the databases has
already been licensed for the university user community. A link to
the proper reading can be embedded in the course, and when
students are ready for the reading, clicking the link will take them
there directly. Course creators can also link to a search term,
journal database search page, or library general search page. If
Professor  Rush’s  requested  readings are  not  available  through
online journal databases, it may take several months for clearances.
Professor Rush must then decide if she wants to  wait to  get
permission to reproduce these readings or choose other applicable
readings from those available in journal databases.
Case B:Professor Allbusiness has written a business administration
course  centering  on  several  business  cases.  This  professor  is
continually on the cutting edge of business practice and requires the
most recent cases. Two of the largest creators of business cases,
however, still do not allow certain of their materials (such as new
cases) to be converted to electronic files and delivered to students,
no matter what the format (e.g., password-protected site, 
CD-
252
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
C# PDF bookmark Library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.
Help to add or insert bookmark and outline into PDF file in .NET framework. Ability to remove and delete bookmark and outline from PDF document.
copy pages from pdf to word; delete page in pdf file
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Add metadata to PDF document in C# .NET framework program. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file. Also a PDF metadata extraction control.
delete page pdf file reader; delete pages from pdf without acrobat
ROM
, in pdf format on their own Web site). In this situation, it is
simplest to get permission to reproduce these materials in print
format, and mail them to the student in a printed reading file. 
Case C: Professor Tacitus has worked in distance education for 30
years, and has several established and comprehensive humanities
courses in print form, some with accompanying music cassette
tapes. Professor Tacitus is interested in new technologies and now
wants all of his material to be available online. In this case, much
of the third-party material may already be in the public domain,
and therefore can be used in the alternate format of online publi-
cation. Other materials, for which permissions have been obtained
for print use, will require new  permissions for  electronic  use.
Clearing the rights for the music requires more research. Some
tunes will be in the public domain, but their performances and the
production of the songs will not be. In this case, performers’ and
producers’ rights must be considered. It may take up to a year to
secure permissions to reproduce all of this material for a Web site
that may be technically ready in only days.
Processes
The Athabasca University Copyright Office uses a collection of
form letters to initiate and maintain contact with copyright holders.
An initial contact letter is shown in Figure 9-3. Prior to making any
contact, searches are made to identify a copyright or permissions
administrator to whom the letter should be addressed. Often, e-
mail will be the easiest primary method of contact. A sample e-mail
response to a standard faxed request is shown in Figure 9-4.
Trad
i
t
i
ona
l
K
now
l
edge
Although not directly related to issues of copyright for online
materials  in Canada or systems for  negotiating copyright  per-
missions, traditional knowledge is another issue that online course
developers must be aware of. Before using stories, ideas, images, or
sounds from an Indigenous group, consideration must be given to
253
Copyright Issues in Online Courses: A Moment in Time
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing
add and remove pages from pdf file online; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in
Add permanent metadata to PDF document in VB .NET framework program. Remove and delete metadata content from PDF file in Visual Basic .NET application.
delete page pdf; acrobat extract pages from pdf
254
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
Figure 9-3.
Sample initial 
contact letter.
Our File # XXXX XXX RF/X
October XX, 20XX
J
ournal Title
Copyright and Permissions
Address
Address
Fax:  XXX-XXX-XXXX
Dear Xxxx Xxxx:
RE: Author’s Surname, First Name or Initial. “Article title” as
found in: 
J
ournal Title at www.xxxxxxxxx.xxx. Date of posting.
Location:  Copyright Holder, page range. 
On the understanding that you own copyright, this letter is to
request permission to reproduce the above material. We have
designed a course titled Course Number: Course Title, and
would like to use this material in our course package. This
course package will be in electronic format, stored on a server
owned and maintained by Athabasca University. This server is
key and password protected, accessible only to registered
students. We are requesting non-exclusive world rights.
Athabasca University is a public, government-supported, non-
profit distance education institution. Enrolled students may
choose from two basic delivery modes: individualized study
(print-based or online-enhanced) or grouped study (classroom
or e-Class). Each delivery mode implements different learning
methods, including online and online-enhanced courses,
classroom instruction, e-Class, tele- and video-conferencing,
telecourses, home labs, and computer mediated instruction.
We look forward to your faxed reply. Thank you.
Sincerely,
Lori-Ann Claerhout 
Copyright Officer
Permission granted for reproduction as
described above:
Credit Statement:______________________
Name_________________ Position_______ 
______________________ ______________
Signature
Date
traditional forms of intellectual property transmission and credit.
In practice, Canadian Indigenous Elders’ knowledge has been held
by the community. Who owns these rights within the community is
not always clear. 
Athabasca University’s Centre for World Indigenous Knowledge
and Research (
CWIKR
) works within a larger community of world
Indigenous  leaders. 
CWIKR
consults  with four decision-making
groups. Three of them are 
CWIKR
’s consensus-based Nehiyiwak
Caucus, an Internal Advisory Committee, and an External Advisory
255
Copyright Issues in Online Courses: A Moment in Time
Figure 9-4. 
Sample e-mail 
response.
Source: Adapted and reproduced with permission from copyright holder.
Hello 
XXXXX
,
Thank you, I have received your fax requesting permission to
use the electronic copy of 
XXXXX
, for the above course which
begins in September. A PDF copy of the case is now posted for
you on our private case pick-up site. To access this file please
go to our site at:
xxxxxxx 
Enter your email address as above and the password 
XXXX
####.
You have access to the file until August 7th.
Your authorization to use the case will be sent to you by fax. An
invoice for the 
PDF
master and the permission will follow by
regular mail 60 days from the start date of the course. Please let
me know before then if the number of copies used changes.
Please be sure to contact me if you have any questions.
Kind Regards,
Xxxxxx
Xxxxx Xxxxx, 
Account Representative,
Xxxxxxxxxxx Publishing, Xxxxxxxxx
Committees, which primarily make planning decisions and identify
key  issues  for  the  program.  The  fourth  group  is  an  Elder’s
Committee, which provides guidance on all issues, and sits on all
other committees. These committees consider issues of appropria-
tion,  knowledge ownership, and usage; and must be consulted
before traditional knowledges are used.
10
Conc
l
us
i
on
Everyone who can access a computer is a potential creator and user
of  copyright-protected  material.  The  establishment  of  new
technologies demands that new creators learn about copyright laws
and best practices for use of materials presented electronically. To
maintain the balance between creators’ and users’ rights, the gov-
ernments of Canada and other countries must adapt their copyright
laws. Until laws find a way both to protect creators’ rights and to
allow easy use of electronic materials, the potentials of new tech-
nologies in online education will not be realized. 
R
e
f
erences
Athabasca  University.  (2002).  Intellectual  indebtedness  and
plagiarism. Master of Arts—Integrated Studies 656. Datascapes:
Information  aesthetics  and  networ
k
culture  course  guide.
Athabasca, 
AB
: Author. 
Bloom, J. (2002, November 22). Right and wrong: The copy-right
infringement. National Review Online. Retrieved October 9,
2003, from http://www.nationalreview.com/comment/comment-
bloom112202.asp 
Contreras, J., Breuer, C., 
&
Penfold, L. (2002, October 3). The
tangled web of global deep-linking rules. Retrieved November
15, 2003, from the Hale and Dorr 
LLP
Web site: http://www
.haledorr.com/publications/pubsdetail.asp?ID=133761032002
Delio,  M.  (2002a,  July  8).  Deep  link  foes  get  another  win.
Wired.com.Retrieved October 9, 2003, from http://www.wired
.com/news/politics/0,1283,53697,00.html 
256
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
10
Athabasca University’s
Centre for World Indige-
nous Knowledge and
Research provides more
information online.
Retrieved November 16,
2003 from http://www
.athabascau.ca/indigenous
Delio,  M.  (2002b,  April  18).  Deep  links  return  to  surface.
Wired.com.
Retrieved  October  9,  2003,  from
http://www.wired.com/news/politics/0,1283,51887,00.html 
Geist, M. (2002, October 17). Net copyright reform: It’s deep in
policy  agenda.  [Electronic  version]. The Globe and Mail.
Retrieved October 9, 2003, from http://www.globeandmail.com
/servlet/ArticleNews/printarticle/gam/20021017/
TWGEIS
Industry  Canada.  (2002,  October  3). Supporting culture and
innovation: Report  on  the  provisions  and  operation of  the
Copyright Act.Retrieved October 9, 2003, from http://strategis
.ic.gc.ca/epic/internet/incrp-prda.nsf/vwGeneratedInterE/
h_rp01106e.html
Ivey School of Business. (N.d.). Quick search. Retrieved October 9,
2003, from http://www.ivey.uwo.ca/cases/cps.asp?pvar=Main 
Kelly v. Arriba, No.00-55521, D.C. No. CV-99-00560-GLT. (2001,
2002).  Retrieved  October  9,  2003,  from  http://www.ca9
.uscourts.gov/ca9/newopinions.nsf/C38AD9E9A70DB1518825
6B5700813AD7/$file/0055521.pdf?openelement 
Murray, C. (2002, June 11). “Deep-linking” flap could deep-six
direct links to relevant content for students. eSchool News.
Retrieved  July  4,  2002,  from  http://www.eschoolnews.com/
news/showStory.cfm?ArticleID=3789
Pearson  Education  Canada.  (2003).  Copyright  permission.
Retrieved  October  9,  2003,  from  http://www.pearsoned.ca/
highered/permission.html
Prentice Hall. (2000). Permissions. Retrieved October 9, 2003,
from http://www.prenhall.com/mischtm/permissions.html
Public Works and Government Services Canada. (N.d.). Application
for  copyright  clearance  on  Government  of  Canada  works.
Retrieved October 9, 2003, from http://cgp-egc.gc.ca/copyright/
application-e.pdf
Simonson, M., Smaldino, S., Albright, M., 
&
Zvacek, S. (2003).
Teaching and learning at a distance: Foundations of distance
education (2d ed.). Upper Saddle River, 
NJ
: Pearson Education.
Thomson Learning. (2004). Permissions form. Retrieved January
27,  2004,  from  http://www.thomsonrights.com/permissions
/action/begin
257
Copyright Issues in Online Courses: A Moment in Time
University of Alberta. (2002). Why students plagiarize. Retrieved
October  9,  2003,  from  http://www.library.ualberta.ca/guides/
plagiarism/why/index.cfm
World  Intellectual  Property  Organization. (2001).  Home  page.
Retrieved October 9, 2003, from http://www.wipo.org 
258
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested