c# open pdf file in adobe reader : Cut pages from pdf SDK control service wpf azure web page dnn TPOL_book29-part1538

C H H A A P T ER  1 1 0
VA
L
U
E
ADD
E
D—TH
E
E
D
I
TO
R
I
N D
E
S
I
GN AND
D
E
V
EL
OPM
E
NT OF ON
LI
N
E
COU
R
S
E
S
Jan Thiessen & Vince Ambrock
Athabasca University
I
ntroduct
i
on
The editor has traditionally played a key role in the design and
development of instructional and educational materials. As both
the  Web  and  the  technology  and  processes  for  delivering
instructional materials on it have evolved, so too has the editor’s
role in course design and delivery. The typical “Web editor” has a
broad and changing range  of  responsibilities,  from editing and
verifying  course  content  to  evaluating  the  efficacy  of  online
instructional tools, from unsnarling copyright issues to testing and
applying new multimedia applications. One aspect of the editor’s
role, however, has remained unchanged in the course development
process—the editor adds value to the course development value
chain by improving course material quality, enhancing students’
learning experiences, and ensuring that course quality standards
are set and maintained for the delivering institution.
Our model for defining and studying the online editor’s role in
the  course  development  process  is  the  School  of  Business  at
Athabasca  University.  The  School  of  Business  has  taken  a
leadership role in delivering distance education courses online (e-
Class
®
mode),  as  well  as  in  providing  online  enhancements  to
existing print-based courses, and converting these courses to online
formats  (online  individualized  study  mode).  The  multimedia
instructional design editor (
MIDE
) is a key member of the School’s
online course design, development, and production team. The job
title, 
MIDE
(and the particular configuration of skills and duties
associated with it), is unique to the School of Business, combining,
as it  suggests,  the  tasks  of  integrating multimedia  instructional
components  into online  course materials, applying  instructional
design principles, and editing course materials. However, although
259
Cut pages from pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
cut pages out of pdf online; delete pages on pdf
Cut pages from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete blank pages in pdf files; delete a page from a pdf reader
the 
MIDE
is unique to the School of Business, many of the duties
and responsibilities of the job are typical of other online course
development projects. 
The School of Business developed the job of 
MIDE
to achieve a
number of course  development objectives.  First,  to  ensure  that
standards  of  product and  pedagogical  quality  are achieved  (an
institutional objective), the 
MIDE
is responsible for editing course
materials  before  they  are  delivered  to  students.  Second,  many
School  of  Business  print-based  courses  make  use  of  online
enhancements or are adapted for online delivery, so the 
MIDE
is
charged with increasing the use of multimedia components and
online  interactivity  tools,  while  ensuring  that  they  accomplish
meaningful  instructional  purposes.  Finally,  the 
MIDE
has  been
given responsibility for applying instructional design principles and
strategies to online courses and course enhancements. Although
most  School  of  Business  courses  were  instructionally  designed
when written for print-based delivery, converting them for online
delivery raises further instructional design issues.
The 
MIDE
’s role adds value to the delivery of online courses to
School of Business students in three ways: first, by linking other
participants in the value chain, and so increasing the effectiveness
and efficiency of the entire process; second, by increasing the ability
of value  chain  participants  to  produce  effective online learning
experiences; and third, by providing a measure of quality control to
ensure  that  online  courses  are  consistent,  technologically
innovative, and pedagogically sound.
D
i
stance 
E
ducat
i
on and the 
On
li
ne 
I
nstruct
i
ona
l
E
nv
i
ronment
School  of  Business  courses  are delivered  at  a  distance.  Course
materials for distance education, whether online or print, “take a
learner-centred  approach,  rather  than  the  traditional  content-
centred approach of textbooks” (Swales, 2000, p. 1). According to
Swales, this learner-centered feature enables students “to become
involved and motivated by the materials and to take ownership of
the skills and knowledge that they acquire” (p. 1). That distance
education  course  materials  must  motivate,  engage,  direct,  and
support students means that the course editor makes an important
260
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
delete pages pdf files; cut pages from pdf online
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
C:\test1.pdf") Dim pdf2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\test2.pdf") Dim pageindexes = New Integer() {1, 2, 4} Dim pages = pdf.DuplicatePage(pageindexes
delete pages from pdf online; delete page on pdf
contribution.  The  hybrid  role  of  the 
MIDE
is particularly well
suited to enhancing distance delivery, especially when courses are
delivered online. 
In the case of online delivery, the learning environment becomes
a particular and important consideration. Kuboni notes that the
term  learning  environment  has  emerged  “as  one  of  the  key
metaphors associated with teaching and learning through the new
telecommunications  and  computer-networked  technologies”
(1999, p. 3). As a context in which learning takes place, the online
learning  environment  has  several  features;  for  example,  it
encourages a reduction in the emphasis on the didactic role of the
teacher, while emphasizing collaboration; it enables the develop-
ment  of  process  skills  and  knowledge  building,  rather  than
information and knowledge acquisition; and it supports collabo-
rative group activities (Kuboni, 1999).
If the online instructional and learning environment presents
challenges and opportunities not found in conventional face-to-face
or traditional distance delivery, so too do the multimedia tools used
within it.
Nunes and Gaible (2002) contend that multimedia is “the most
effective  and  egalitarian  of  computer-based  resources  available” 
(p.  95).  Multimedia,  and  the  online  learning  environment  that
delivers  and supports it, provide for  “artful  interaction between
learners  and  content”  (p.  95).  As  with  conventional  distance
delivery  practice,  it  is  possible  to  offer  “learning  in  different
locations . . . for students working at different rates and levels, [as
well as] repetition when repetition is warranted” (p. 95). Nunes and
Gaible state that multi-media is especially well suited to “dynamic
fields”  and  that  “Web-based  multimedia  contentware  is  itself
dynamic” (p. 95). That multimedia and the online environment are
dynamic seems an obvious conclusion when we imagine the myriad
ways  learners  can  interact  with  content  in  text,  visual,  audio,
animated, and other forms, through graphic and other interfaces.
This  conclusion  is  reinforced  by  the  online  environment’s
possibilities for learner interaction with teachers and other learners,
at any time, and from any place. 
As  defined  in The Concise O
x
ford  Dictionary, the word
dynamicmeans the opposite of static; it is the reverse of “station-
ary; not acting or changing; passive” (Thompson, 1995, p. 1361).
As dynamic entities, multimedia and the online environment offer
261
Value Added—The Editor in Design and Development of Online Courses
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in VB.NET. Copy, paste and cut PDF image while preview without adobe reader component installed.
delete pdf pages android; delete pages from a pdf
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
C#.NET PDF SDK - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in C#.NET. C#.NET Demo Code: Cut Image in PDF Page in C#.NET. PDF image cutting is similar to image deleting.
delete blank pages in pdf online; best pdf editor delete pages
opportunities for various kinds of interaction and active learning,
and for “the chance to work with current and even cutting-edge
knowledge” (Nunes & Gaible, 2002, p. 95). Rather than confine
the  design,  development,  and  delivery  of  learning  content  to
technical and production experts, it may be possible to “engage all
stakeholders in the education system . . . in the development of
multimedia learning resources” (p. 95).
However, the dynamic nature of the online environment also
presents unique challenges for course developers and editors. Web
content, links,  and  interactive  elements  are ever  changing,  and
require constant vigilance to maintain their currency. Moreover,
taking full advantage of the many multimedia and graphic enhance-
ments available in this dynamic environment comes at a price. A
simple-looking  but  effectively  designed  multimedia  tool  often
requires  many  resources  and  a  significant  amount  of  time  to
produce and test, and increases the workload and knowledge level
required  of  instructional,  technical,  and  production  staff  to
implement and maintain.
The online environment has the potentialfor fast and easy inter-
action among  diverse and distributed users, a fact that raises a
number of issues about how this interaction is accomplished, when
it is appropriate, and  how  it  is managed. Similarly,  although a
myriad  of  learning  experiences  and  opportunities  are  available
through the online environment, questions of how much diversity
to offer, what instructional purposes each tool serves, and how to
manage the tools selected also become important. In the School of
Business,  the 
MIDE
addresses  these  issues  from  a  learner’s
(student’s)  perspective  in  both the  multimedia and  instructional
design components of their role. However, course content experts
and the technical, production, and other learning support staff also
have needs that must be met as this interaction with learners takes
place. The 
MIDE
must consider these needs when determining the
effectiveness  of  online  learning  and  interactive  tools  and  tech-
nology.
These varied demands present great challenges for the 
MIDE
,
who must apply precise editorial and instructional design standards
across the various course components. Increasing the number of
people engaged in the development process, and the number of
times learning content is subject to revision or change, makes it
difficult  to  achieve  and  maintain  control  over  these standards.
262
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete page pdf acrobat reader; delete pdf pages online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
doc2.Save(outPutFilePath); Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using C#. Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in C#.NET.
delete page numbers in pdf; delete pages from pdf reader
Furthermore, the 
MIDE
requires an ever-growing range of skills, as
well as flexibility in defining the scope of their duties, in order to
check and evaluate the diverse components that make up an online
course, and faces a constant challenge in balancing the learning
needs  of  students  against  technological  and  course  production
constraints and requirements.
Course Deve
l
opment 
i
n an On
li
ne 
E
nv
i
ronment—the 
R
o
l
e o
f
the 
M
I
D
E
Mu
l
t
i
med
i
a
In their capacity as editors, School of Business 
MIDE
s develop an
intimate knowledge of the content of each course. They are one of
the final links in the content chain, and review all online course
components when they are ready to be integrated into the Web-
based delivery template. The 
MIDE
s occupy a unique position in
the design and development process, far enough along that they see
a course in its entirety and can clearly identify good locations for
using particular multimedia and interactive components, but still
early  enough that  there  is  time  to develop and integrate  those
components  and  explore  new  ideas  for  enhancing  educational
materials.
As a means of making course production more efficient, and in
keeping with a general trend toward collecting and reusing effective
multimedia tools, the 
MIDE
s play an important role in identifying
online components and tools that have widespread applicability
and can be used in several courses. The School of Business is still
exploring ways to store these components and simplify their use
across an array of course materials, and the trend at Athabasca
University, and in online learning in general, toward storing and
reusing multimedia applications, learning objects, and databases
presents many choices and opportunities for research. The 
MIDE
is
a vital link in this research, working as a liaison between School of
Business academics and production teams and other departments
throughout the university that are developing data and learning
object storage strategies (e.g., the Library, the Educational Media
Development department).
263
Value Added—The Editor in Design and Development of Online Courses
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
example, you may easily create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s
pdf delete page; add or remove pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
example, you may easily create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s
reader extract pages from pdf; add and remove pages from a pdf
I
nstruct
i
ona
l
Des
i
gn
All new or significantly revised online courses are submitted to
School of Business instructional staff for a preliminary assessment
of their design, content, and learning objectives. At this point, the
MIDE
performs a cursory instructional design (
ID
) assessment on
the  proposed course.  At  this  stage,  too, a dedicated  School of
Business instructional designer also reviews the proposal and offers
ideas for improving the course’s instructional efficacy to the course
author. However, as courses and their constituent elements often
undergo  a  significant  transformation  between  proposal  and
delivery, the bulk of the 
ID 
evaluation performed by the 
MIDE
is
necessarily done after the course has been written or revised, when
it is submitted for editing and production. Although this strategy
can shorten the amount of time available for evaluating and testing
new ideas for 
ID
and multimedia tools in a course, it is, overall, a
good use of limited resources. New courses are reviewed by the
School  of  Business  instructional  designer,  but  existing  courses
(often high enrolment courses) that are being revised or converted
for online delivery might or might not have had the benefit of 
ID
at
some  point  in  their  development  (the  School  has  only  one
instructional designer, and many new courses that require 
ID
). In
many cases, the content of a course has been revised regularly, but
issues  related  to  its  instructional  efficacy  have  not  been
systematically addressed in the revisions. This is where the 
ID
role
of the 
MIDE
, and its late application in the production process, is
especially useful in assessing and dealing with instructional quality
issues  without  returning  a  course  to  the  beginning  stages  of
development. 
As part of their instructional design role, 
MIDE
s also check and
evaluate  course  design  and  layout  for  instructional  efficacy,
providing input to authors and production staff. The 
MIDE
ensures
that all resources are relevant, linked, and coordinated. It is essen-
tial  that  course  components  intended  to  present  and  deliver
information are clearly differentiated from learning activities which
are  designed  for  application  or  practice.  The  purpose  of  the
learning activities must be clearly presented, and it must be obvious
to learners what action the learning activities require, as well as
how and where to obtain feedback. The 
MIDE
also determines if
the learning resources work, if they work as they are intended to,
264
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
and if  the  instructions for their use  are clear.  This  function is
particularly crucial with multimedia components.
While working with existing courses, and in the instructional
design role, the 
MIDE 
reviews course components at a number of
levels (Swales, 2000). At a course level, the 
MIDE
determines if the
course components support and conform to course objectives. At
the  unit level,  it is essential that  unit objectives support,  build
toward, and align with the larger course objectives. Each learning
objective in each unit or lesson is assessed to ensure that it is clear,
unambiguous, measurable, and related to the content in the lesson
or unit. The 
MIDE
determines whether or not the lesson and review
activities, as well as technical elements, such as multimedia com-
ponents and interactivity tools, contribute to the ability of learners
to meet the learning objectives of the course, and to see for them-
selves that they have done so. In online courses, as with traditional
distance delivery, this “seeing” must take place in the absence of
same-time and face-to-face interaction with a teacher.
E
d
i
t
i
ng
The 
MIDE
’s primary role in course development is as an editor. In
the online course development and production process, the 
MIDE
is situated at the same point as editors in more traditional course
development models. The 
MIDE
reviews all course materials and
components,  revising,  and  in consultation  with  course  authors,
clarifying  content,  and  ensuring  that  the  text  is  grammatically
correct, concise,  and online-ready. As  do all editors, the 
MIDE
ensures that the tone of the course materials is appropriate for the
audience, and for the purpose of helping learning to happen, and
that coauthored materials communicate either a consistent voice or
a clearly defined set of individual voices, as desired by the authors
and suitable for the content. Editors ensure that course materials
are not biased and do not contain plagiarism, and that all necessary
copyright  clearances  have  been  obtained.  Finally,  Web-ready
content  is  copy  edited to ensure that  all  i’s are  dotted  and  t’s
crossed, and that the rules of grammar and punctuation have been
correctly and consistently applied.
As editors, more so than in their other roles, 
MIDE
s serve as
proxies for the learners who will work through all components of
265
Value Added—The Editor in Design and Development of Online Courses
the  online  course.  The 
MIDE
ensures  that  information  about
assignments,  including  instructions  to  students,  assignment
questions,  guidelines  for assignment  marking,  and examination
guidelines, is correct, consistent, and readily available to students.
Well-edited  course  materials  anticipate  and  address  learner
concerns and needs for information, and so prevent work at the
“back-end” of the course delivery process (instructor and technical
support  assistance  calls),  and  build  student  confidence  in  and
satisfaction with School of Business online course materials. 
Add
i
ng Va
l
ue—The 
M
I
D
Ei
n the Des
i
gn 
and Deve
l
opment Process
The 
MIDE
, then, contributes to many aspects and levels of course
design  and  development,  and  at  each  level  affects  the  online
learning value chain. The effects of this contribution, however, are
difficult to measure empirically. The 
MIDE
works in the design and
development  component  of  the  online  learning  value  chain,
between upstream logistics (described in earlier chapters as infra-
structure for online learning, technology choice, and attributes of
various  media)  and  downstream  logistics  (to  be  discussed  in
subsequent  chapters,  and  including  learner  supports  such  as
tutoring,  call  centers,  and  electronic  library  and  other  digital
resources). Their interactions with the  other  participants in  the
value chain help to highlight the contribution that 
MIDE
s make to
the online delivery process (for a full discussion of the concept of
“value chain,” see the Chapter 3 of this volume).
In  each  role—instructional  design,  multimedia  development,
and  editing—the 
MIDE
is  concerned  with  facilitating  commu-
nication  between  the  author  and the  learner,  and  between  the
author and the technical staff who create the multimedia tools and
instructional  technology  used  in  course  delivery.  The 
MIDE
explores new resources and opens lines of communication between
the many participants in the design and development value chain,
and  looks  for  solutions  to  instructional  issues  that  will  satisfy
technical  staff,  academic  experts,  students,  and  upstream  and
downstream support resources. The 
MIDE
searches for and eval-
uates ways to enhance the overall instructional efficacy of each
266
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
course, and thus works constantly to bring the various elements of
the online delivery value chain together as efficiently and effectively
as possible. 
But just as the 
MIDE
brings together elements and participants in
the value chain, they also add  value to  the  course  development
process by enhancing the ability of other participants to produce
effective online learning experiences. Rowntree (1990) refers to this
role  in  course  development  as  the transformer, “a  skilled com-
municator who can liaise with any subject specialists whose writing
is obscure, winkling out their key ideas and re-expressing them in
ways learners will be able to understand” (p. 21). The 
MIDE
helps
authors to refine and distil the material they want learners to grasp,
and looks  for  the best tools  and  techniques  for  presenting  this
material concisely and effectively. 
MIDE
s review and evaluate each
element in the content and design of  a course, so they have an
opportunity to share their expertise and knowledge with the course
development team and to facilitate communication and knowledge
sharing among authors, production and support staff, and technical
personnel. This knowledge sharing benefits everyone in the process,
and enhances the ability of all value chain participants to make an
effective contribution to course development.
The 
MIDE
’s most important contribution to the course design
and development value chain is quality control. The quality control
function has become more critical as courses have come to contain
multimedia  components  and  to  move  into  the  online  learning
environment. McGovern (2002) points out that “trillions of words
are published on millions of websites [and] much of this publishing
is of appalling quality.” On the surface, online publishing, which
has eliminated the highly technical tasks of typesetting, printing,
and distribution, appears deceptively simple. In particular, revising
online material seems to be quick, simple, and straightforward.
And in many ways, it is. Open the source document, use a simple
text editor, save the changes to the server, and every course can
contain what Nunes and Gaible (2002) refer to as “cutting-edge
knowledge” (p. 95). If consistent presentation and appearance were
the only issues to address, this capacity for multiple participants to
revise courses “on the fly” would be a serious enough concern for
the 
MIDE
 But  “technology  is  founded  on  the  promise  of
automation [and] you simply can’t automate the creation of quality
267
Value Added—The Editor in Design and Development of Online Courses
content” (McGovern, 2002). Putting poor content into the online
learning  environment  can  have  especially  serious  consequences,
both for students and for the delivering institution.
As do editors in any course development project, 
MIDE
s ensure
that all course materials are complete and functional, and that they
meet instructional, aesthetic, and editorial standards as established
by  Athabasca  University  and  other  educational  and  publishing
institutions. With the course  learning goals in  mind, the 
MIDE
critically evaluates course materials from the learner’s perspective,
and  considers  the  learner’s  needs  and  likely  responses  to  the
information presented in the course. The 
MIDE
ensures that all the
pieces of a course work toward the same goal, and that the pieces
fit together in a unified whole that provides effective instruction for
students. By ensuring that the course materials delivered to students
are of consistently high quality, the 
MIDE
contributes to students’
confidence in School of Business courses, removes material-based
obstacles to their learning, and enhances Athabasca University’s
reputation  as  a  credible,  learning-centered  distance  education
institution.
R
e
f
erences
Kuboni, O. (1999). Designing learning environments to facilitate
reflection in professional practice: Some initial thoughts.Paper
presented at 
TEL
-isphere ’99, The Caribbean and technology-
enhanced  learning  [conference],  St.  Michael,  Barbados,
November 24-27, 1999. Retrieved July 22, 2003, from http://
www.col.org/tel99/acrobat/kuboni.pdf
McGovern,  G.  (2002,  Oct.  14).  Words  make  your  website  a
success. New Thin
k
ing. Retrieved July 22, 2003, from http://
www.gerrymcgovern.com/nt/2002/nt_2002_10_14_words.htm
Nunes, C. A. A., 
&
Gaible, E. (2002). Development of multimedia
materials. In W. D. Haddad 
&
A. Draxler (Eds.), Technologies
for education: Potentials, parameters,  and prospects (pp. 95-
117). Paris and Washington, 
DC: UNESCO
and Academy for
Educational Development.
Rowntree, D. (1990). Teaching through self-instruction: How to
develop open learning materials. London: Kogan Page.
268
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested