c# open pdf file in adobe reader : Delete pages in pdf online Library control component .net web page asp.net mvc TPOL_book30-part1540

Swales, C. (2000). Knowledge series: Editing distance education
materials. Vancouver, 
BC
: Commonwealth of Learning.
Thompson, D. (Ed.). (1995). The concise O
x
ford dictionary (9th
ed.). Oxford: Clarendon Press. 
269
Value Added—The Editor in Design and Development of Online Courses
Delete pages in pdf online - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete blank pages in pdf; delete pages pdf file
Delete pages in pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
copy pages from pdf into new pdf; delete page on pdf document
270
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete a page from a pdf online; delete pdf pages acrobat
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete a page from a pdf file; delete pages from pdf online
PA
R
 4
De
li
very,
Qua
li
ty
Contro
l
and Student
Support 
o
f
On
li
ne
Courses
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET
delete blank page from pdf; acrobat remove pages from pdf
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pages on pdf file; add and delete pages in pdf
272
Volume 1–Theory and Practice of Online Learning
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
delete pages from a pdf in preview; delete pages on pdf online
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete page pdf online; add remove pages from pdf
C H A P T E R   1 1
T
E
ACH
I
NG 
I
N AN ON
LI
N
E
LE
A
R
N
I
NG
CONT
EX
T
Terry Anderson
Athabasca University
I
ntroduct
i
on
This chapter focuses on the role of the teacher or tutor in an online
learning  context.  It  uses  the  theoretical  model  developed  by
Garrison, Anderson, and Archer (2000) that views the creation of
an effective online educational community as involving three critical
components:  cognitive  presence,  social  presence,  and  teaching
presence. This model was developed and verified through content
analysis and by other qualitative and quantitative measures in recent
research work at the University of Alberta (for papers resulting from
this  work  see  Anderson,  Garrison,  Archer  &  Rourke,  N.d.)
(http://www.atl.ualberta.ca/cmc). 
Learning and teaching in an online environment are, in many
ways,  much  like  teaching  and  learning  in  any  other  formal
educational context: learners’ needs are assessed; content is nego-
tiated  or  prescribed;  learning  activities  are  orchestrated;  and
learning is assessed. However, the pervasive effect of the online
medium creates a unique environment for teaching and learning.
The most compelling feature of this context is the capacity for
shifting the time and place of the educational interaction. Next
comes the ability to support content encapsulated in many formats,
including  multimedia,  video,  and  text,  which  gives  access  to
learning content  that  exploits all media  attributes.  Third,  the
capacity of the Net to access huge repositories of content on every
conceivable subject—including content created by the teacher and
fellow students—creates learning and study resources previously
available only in the largest research libraries, but now accessible in
every home and workplace. Finally, the capacity to support human
and machine interaction in a variety of formats (text, speech, video,
273
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. Explanation about transparency. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online. This
acrobat extract pages from pdf; delete pages pdf files
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pdf page acrobat; delete a page from a pdf
etc.) in both asynchronous and synchronous modalities creates a
communications-rich learning context. 
To provide a mental schema for thinking about learning and
teaching in this context, Garrison, Anderson, and Archer (2000)
developed a conceptual model of online learning that they referred to
as a “community of learning” model. This model (see Figure 11-1)
postulates that deep and meaningful learning results when there are
sufficient levels of  three component “presences.” The first  is a
sufficient degree of cognitive presence,such that serious learning can
take place in an environment that supports the development and
growth of critical thinking skills. Cognitive presence is grounded in
and defined by study of a particular content; thus, it works within the
epistemological, cultural, and social expression of the content in an
approach that supports the development of critical thinking skills
(McPeck, 1990; Garrison, 1991). The second, social presence,relates
to the establishment of a supportive environment such that students
feel the necessary degree of comfort and safety to express their ideas
in a collaborative context. The absence of social presence leads to an
inability  to  express  disagreements,  share  viewpoints,  explore
differences, and accept support and confirmation from peers and
teacher.  Finally,  in  formal  education,  as  opposed  to  infor-mal
learning opportunities, teaching presence is critical for a variety of
reasons discussed in this chapter. 
In a work on teaching presence, Anderson, Rourke, Archer, and
Garrison  (2001)  delineated  three  critical  roles  that  a  teacher
performs in the process of creating an effective teaching presence.
The first of these roles is the design and organization of the learning
experience that takes place both before the establishment of the
learning community  and during its operation. Second, teaching
involves devising and implementing activities to encourage discourse
between and among students, between the teacher and the student,
and between individual students and groups of students and content
resources (Anderson, 2002). Third, the teaching role goes beyond
that of moderating the learning experiences when the teacher adds
subject matter expertise through a variety of forms of direct instruc-
tion. The creation of teaching presence is not always the sole task of
the formal teacher. In many contexts, especially when teaching at
senior university level, teaching presence is delegated to or assumed
by students as they contribute their own skills and knowledge to the
developing learning community. 
274
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
In addition to these tasks, in formal education, the institution
and  its  teacher  employees  are  usually  fulfilling  a  critical
credentialing role that involves the assessment and certification of
student learning. This chapter focuses on these component parts of
teaching presence, defining and illustrating techniques to enhance
this  presence,  and  providing  suggestions  for  effective  teacher
practice in an online learning context.
275
Teaching in an Online Learning Conte
x
E
ducational
experience
Social 
presence
Supporting
discourse
Teaching presence
(structure/process)
Selecting
content
Setting
climate
Cognitive
presence
Figure 11-1.
Community of inquiry.
Des
i
gn
i
ng and Organ
i
z
i
ng the On
li
ne 
L
earn
i
ng Context 
The design and construction of the course content, learning acti-
vities, and assessment framework constitute the first opportunity for
teachers to develop their “teacher presence.” The role the teacher
plays in creating and maintaining the course contents varies from
that of a tutor working with materials and an instructional design
created by others, to that of “lone ranger,” in which the teacher
creates all of the content. Regardless of the formal role of the
teacher, online learning creates an opportunity for flexibility and
revision of content in situ that was not provided by older forms of
mediated teaching and learning. The vast educational and content
resources of the Net, and its capacity to support many different
forms of interaction, allow for negotiation of content and activity,
and a corresponding increase in autonomy and control (Garrison 
&
Baynton, 1987). Teachers are no longer confined to the construction
of monolithic packages that are not easily modified in response to
student  need.  Rather, the  design and  organization  of activities
within the learning community can proceed while the course is in
progress. Of course, such flexibility is not without cost, as custom-
ization of any product is more expensive than mass production of a
standardized product. Thus, the effective online learning teacher
makes provision for negotiation of activities, or even content, to
satisfy unique learning needs. However, within this flexibility, the
need to stimulate, guide, and support learning remains. These tasks
include the design of a series of learning activities that encourage
independent study and community building, that deeply explore
content knowledge, that provide frequent and diverse forms of
formative assessment, and that respond to common and unique
student needs and aspirations (see Chapter 2, this volume).
The design of e-learning courses is covered in greater detail in
earlier chapters of this book, but this design process provides
opportunities for teachers to instil their own teaching presence by
establishing a personalized tone within the course content. This is
done by allowing students to see the personal excitement and
appeal that inspires the teacher’s interest in the subject. Borge
Holmberg (1989) first wrote about a style of expression, referred
to as “guided didactic interaction,” that presents content in a
conversational (as opposed to academic) style. This writing style
276
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
helps the learner identify, in a personalized way, with the teacher.
Techniques such as illustration of content issues with personal
reflections,  anecdotes,  and  discussions  of  the  teacher’s  own
struggles and successes as they have gained mastery of the content
have been found to be inspirational and motivating to students. 
Activities in this category of teaching presence include building
curriculum materials. The cost of creating high quality, interactive
learning resources has led to renewed interest in reusing content
encapsulated  and  formally  described  through  metadata  as
“learning objects” (Wiley, 2000). These objects are then made
accessible in repositories such as Multimedia Educational Resource
for Learning and Online Teaching (http://www.merlot.org) or the
Campus Alberta Repository of Educational Objects (http://www
.careo.org). Creating or repurposing materials, such as lecture
notes,  to  provide  online  teacher  commentaries,  mini-lectures,
personal insights, and other customized views of course content, is
another common activity that we assign to the category of teaching
presence. We anticipate that work on educational standards for
describing, storing, and sequencing of educational content, and for
formally  modeling  the  way  in  which  learning  activities  are
designed, will significantly change the design role of many teachers
from one of content creation, to one of customization, application
and contextualization of learning sequences (Koper, 2001). Finally,
this design category of teaching presence also includes the processes
through  which  the  instructor  negotiates  time  lines  for  group
activities and student project work, a critical coordinating and
motivating function of formal online course design and develop-
ment, and a primary means of setting and maintaining teaching
presence.
Gett
i
ng the M
i
Ri
ght
The modern Web supports a number of media, each of which can
be  incorporated  into  the  design  of  an online  learning  course.
However, getting the mix right between opportunities for synchro-
nous and asynchronous interaction, and group and independent
study activities remains a  challenge (Daniel 
Marquis, 1988;
Anderson,  2002).  There  are  two  competing  models  of  online
learning, each of which has strong adherents and a growing body of
277
Teaching in an Online Learning Conte
x
research and theoretical rationales for its effective application. The
first, the community of learning model, uses real-time synchronous
or  asynchronous  communication  technologies  to  create  virtual
classrooms  that  are  often  modeled,  both  pedagogically  and
structurally, on the campus classroom. This model evolved from
telephone-based audio (and later video) conferencing. Its evolution
to the Net has allowed for delivery directly to the learner’s office and
home, thereby bypassing expensive remote learning centres that
were a feature of older virtual classroom models. More recently,
popular  Web-based  computer  conferencing  systems  allow  for
asynchronous  collaboration  among  and  between  student  and
teachers. The synchronous virtual classroom model has advantages,
in that it is a familiar educational model with a great deal of simi-
larity to  teaching and learning in campus-based classrooms. It
provides increased access by spanning geographic distance; however,
it constrains participants in terms of a single time that they must be
present. This problem is compounded when a class spans many time
zones. The asynchronous version of the virtual classroom over-
comes the temporal limitations, but can result in a shortage of
coordination and reduce opportunities for students to feel “in sync”
with the class (Burge, 1994). Designing effective online courses will
increasingly involve judicious selection of combinations of media
and format that balance the differential capacities of media  to
support the creation of social and cognitive presence, with the
educational  need  for  variety,  the  special  communications
characteristics demanded of particular content, and the cost, access,
and training requirements of the media.
The  second  model  of  online  learning  involves  independent
learners who work by themselves and at their own pace through
the course of instruction. This model maximizes flexibility, but it
challenges the institution’s capacity to facilitate group social or
collaborative learning activities. The “independent study model” is
almost always selected in online learning models that allow for
continuous  enrolment  or  “just-in-time”  access  to  educational
content. It is very challenging to create collaborative learning or
social activities when students are at very different places in the
curriculum. 
Fortunately, it is possible to combine synchronous, asynchro-
nous, and independent study activities in a single course. In my
278
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested