c# open pdf file in adobe reader : Delete pages pdf preview control application platform web page html winforms web browser TPOL_book31-part1541

own discussions with online students over the years, I have noticed
a deep division between those who yearn for the immediacy of real-
time communication, and those who are adamant that they have
chosen online learning alternatives to avoid the time constraints
imposed by synchronous or paced learning activities. Thus, many
institutions, including Athabasca University, are developing both
paced and unpaced models of delivery to accommodate student
learning preferences and needs. Within a single class, it is possible
to offer optional synchronous activities, and I usually build a real
time Net-based audio graphic session into the beginning section of
my classes. This session allows me to get to know the students from
both a personal and professional viewpoint, explore their aspira-
tions for the course, outline my own interests in the subject, discuss
assessment activities, and provide an opportunity for students to
ask any pressing questions. Synchronous activities are also useful
for guest interviews, for special activities such as debates and
presentations, and of course, for holding the end of class social
gathering—parties held in asynchronous time never seem to work!
These activities can be “canned” and streamed for viewing by
students in independent study mode.
Even if one’s course design or the available technology precludes
synchronous interaction, there are still opportunities to inject more
than text-based lectures and discussions into the course. Online
learning provides an opportunity for the teacher to build in video
or audio presentations of themselves to enhance their presence to
distributed learners. I have created two five-minute video pro-
ductions that I link to my courses. The first provides an introduc-
tion to myself, focusing on my professional growth within the
discipline that I teach. The second discusses my own research
agenda, and not only helps establish my academic credentials, but
also, I hope, conveys my excitement for the research process within
my discipline.
Thus, the challenge for teachers designing and organizing the
online learning context is to create a mix of learning activities that
are appropriate to student needs, teacher skills and style, and
institutional technical capacity. Doing so within the ever-present
financial constraints of formal education systems is a challenge that
will  direct  online  learning  design  and implementation  for  the
foreseeable future. 
279
Teaching in an Online Learning Conte
x
Delete pages pdf preview - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages out of a pdf; delete a page from a pdf acrobat
Delete pages pdf preview - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
cut pages from pdf file; delete pages from pdf
Fac
ili
tat
i
ng D
i
scourse
The second component of teacher presence is the critical task of
facilitating  discourse.  We  use  the  term  discourse  rather  than
discussion, as it conveys the meaning of relating to the “the process
or power of reasoning” (American Heritage Dictionary, 2000),
rather than the more social connotation of conversation. Discourse
not only facilitates the creation of the community of inquiry, but
also is the means by which learners develop their own thought
processes, through the necessity of articulating them to others.
Discourse also helps students uncover misconceptions in their own
thinking, or disagreements with the teacher or other students. Such
conflict provides opportunity for exposure of cognitive dissonance
that, from a Piagetian perspective, is critical to intellectual growth.
In fulfillment of this component of teaching presence, the teacher
regularly reads and responds to student contributions and con-
cerns, constantly searching for ways to support understanding in
the individual student and the development of the learning com-
munity as a whole.
The first task of the e-learning teacher is to develop a sense of
trust and safety within the electronic community. In the absence of
this  trust,  learners will feel  uncomfortable and constrained in
posting their thoughts and comments. We usually facilitate this
trust formation by having students post a series of introductory
comments about themselves. It is useful to request specific infor-
mation, and to model an answer to the response request yourself.
For example the e-teacher may request that students articulate their
reasons for enrolling in the course or their interest in the subject
matter. I have seen this technique very successfully extended at the
beginning of regular online synchronous sessions by asking each
student to respond spontaneously to a content-related “question of
the week” that sets the tone for growth of both social and cognitive
presence.
Many online courses rely extensively on a model of discourse
wherein the teacher posts question or discussion items relevant to
readings or other forms of content dissemination. I have found that
over-reliance on this form of discourse soon becomes boring, and
allows much of the learning to be focused on responding to teacher-
initiated items, rather than challenging students to formulate their
own questions and comments about course content. We have seen
280
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net.
delete page from pdf file; delete blank page in pdf online
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net.
delete pages of pdf online; delete blank pages from pdf file
much  greater  levels  of  participation,  motivation,  and  student
satisfaction  when  such  discussion  groups  are  led  by  student
moderators (Rourke 
&
Anderson, 2002). However, it cannot be
assumed  that  students  have  the  necessary  skills  to  undertake
successful moderation of class discussion, so role modeling by the
teacher for the initial discussions is usually helpful. 
Assessment 
i
n On
li
ne 
L
earn
i
ng
No element of course design concerns the student in a formal
educational context more than that related to assessment. Effective
teaching presence demands explicit and detailed discussion of the
criteria on which student learning will be assessed. A teacher who
cultivates a presence of flexibility, concern, and empathy will reflect
these characteristics in the style and format of assessment. In an
earlier work (Garrison 
&
Anderson, 2003), my colleague Randy
Garrison and I discussed assessment in online learning in greater
detail. Here I summarize the main features of assessment, and
provide two examples of frameworks for the challenging task of
assessing contribution to the online learning community.
We know, from research on assessment, that timely, detailed
feedback provided as near in time as possible to the performance of
the assessed behavior is most effective in providing motivation and
in  shaping  behavior  and  mental  constructs.  For  this  reason,
machine evaluations, such as those provided in online multiple-
choice  test  questions  or  in  simulations,  can  be  very  effective
learning devices (Prensky, 2000). However, most models of online
learning also stress the capacity for direct communication and
feedback from  teacher to the  student (Laurillard, 1997).  This
feedback is provided as an integral part of the discourse facilitation
function of the online teacher. 
A commonly used technique in formal online education is to
require students to post comments as a component of the student
assessment. This practice has been hotly debated on online learning
discussion lists. In their discussion of college students studying
online, Jiang and  Ting (2000)  report that  students’ perceived
learning was significantly correlated to the percentage of grade
weight assigned to participation, and their resulting participation in
discussion.  However,  for  some,  the  practice  of  marking  for
281
Teaching in an Online Learning Conte
x
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
a preview component enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Delete unimportant contents:
copy pages from pdf to new pdf; delete page pdf file reader
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Erase PDF images. • Erase PDF pages. Miscellaneous. • Select PDF text on viewer. • Search PDF text in preview. • View PDF outlines. Related Resources.
add and delete pages in pdf online; delete pages in pdf reader
participation  seems  only  to  recall  the  onerous  practice  of
attendance marking that rewards the quantity and not the quality
of participation  (Campbell,  2002). Others  counter  that  in  the
absence of incentive for participation, a community will not be
created. Palloff and Pratt (1999) argue that, given the emphasis on
the  process of  learning  in  a social  context  that defines much
constructivist-based learning design, participation in the process
must  be  evaluated  and  appropriately  rewarded.  Most  online
students are practical adults with much competition for their time;
thus  they  are  unlikely  to  participate  in  activities  that  are
marginalized or viewed as supplemental to the course goals and
assessment schema. Many courses I have reviewed have assessed
participation in online activities as a component of the final mark,
usually with a weighting of between 10% and 25%. 
Student assessment of any kind requires that the teacher be
explicit, fair, consistent, and as objective as possible. The following
examples illustrate how two experienced online learning teachers
assess  participation,  and  thereby  enhance  their  own  teaching
presence. 
Assessment Frameworks
Susan Levine (2002) has developed a very clear set of instructions
that  describes  her  expectations  for  student  contributions  to
asynchronous  online  learning  courses  that  she  has  used  in
graduate-level education courses. She posts the following message
to her students.
1. The instructor will start each discussion by posting one or
more questions at the beginning of each week (Sunday or
Monday). The discussion will continue until the following
Sunday night, at which time the discussion board will close
for that week.
2. Please focus on the questions posted. But—do bring in
related thoughts and material, other readings, or questions
that occur to you from the ongoing discussion.
3. You are expected to post at least two substantive messages
for each discussion question. Your postings should reflect an
understanding of the course material.
282
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pages from pdf file online; delete pdf pages ipad
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Excel. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Excel file in C#.net.
cut pages out of pdf; delete page pdf acrobat reader
4. Your postings should advance the group’s negotiation of
ideas and meanings about the material; that is, your
contributions should go beyond a “ditto.” Some ways you
can further the discussion include:
• expressing opinions or observations. These should be offered
in depth and supported by more than personal opinion.
• making a connection between the current discussion and
previous discussions, a personal experience, or concepts
from the readings,
• commenting on or asking for clarification of another
student’s statement,
• synthesizing other students’ responses, or
• posing a substantive question aimed at furthering the group’s
understanding. (Levine, 2002)
Notice  how  these  instructions  guide  students  on  both  the
quantity (“two substantive postings” per discussion question) and
the quality of contributions expected. Levine then goes onto to
describe qualitative aspects of a substantive posting. Notice also the
“teaching presence” that emerges from this posting of require-
ments.  Levine  reveals  her  teaching  presence  as structured and
explicit, yet appreciative of qualitative outcomes associated with
deep learning and critical thinking. 
Nada Dabbagh (2000), from George Mason University, offers a
slightly more prescriptive set of recommendations for posting.
• Postings should be evenly distributed during the discussion
period (not concentrated all on one day or at the beginning
and/or end of the period).
• Postings should be a minimum of one short paragraph and a
maximum of two paragraphs.
• Avoid postings that are limited to “I agree” or “great idea,”
etc. If you agree (or disagree) with a posting then say why
you agree by supporting your statement with concepts from
the readings or by bringing in a related example or
experience.
• Address the questions as much as possible (don’t let the
discussion stray).
283
Teaching in an Online Learning Conte
x
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
delete pages from pdf document; delete pages from pdf in preview
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
delete pages from a pdf; delete blank pages in pdf files
• Try to use quotes from the articles that support your postings.
Include page numbers when you do that.
• Build on others’ responses to create threads.
• Bring in related prior knowledge (work experience, prior
coursework, readings, etc.).
• Use proper etiquette (proper language, typing, etc.).
Table 11.1 shows Dabbagh’s sample framework for assessing
messages on a weekly basis. Note that one of the protocols is the
use of proper etiquette, including language, typing, and, I assume,
spelling. The imposition of a requirement to adhere to particular
protocols or standards is a hotly contested question among e-
learning teachers. Some suggest that new forms of expression,
grammar, and even spelling are arising in this medium, and that the
lack of common tools (such as spell checkers) that plague many
conferencing systems should allow for a much more relaxed form
of expression. Others argue that requiring high standard of written
communication helps students learn to communicate effectively in
the online learning academic context. Given my own problems with
spelling and the growing number of online learning students whose
first language is not the language of instruction, I tend to be much
284
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
Criterion 
Timely discussion 
contributions
Responsiveness to 
discussion and 
demonstration of 
knowledge and 
understanding 
gained from 
assigned reading
Adherence to 
online protocols
Points
E
xcellent
5-6 postings 
well distributed 
throughout 
the week
very clear that 
readings were 
understood 
and incorpo-
rated well into 
responses
all online 
protocols 
followed
9-10
Good
4-6 postings 
distributed 
throughout 
the week 
readings were 
understood and 
incorporated 
into responses
1 online protocol 
not adhered to 
8
Average
3-6 postings 
somewhat 
distributed
postings have 
questionable 
relationship to 
reading material
2-3 online 
protocols not 
adhered to 
6-7
Poor
2-6 not 
distributed 
throughout 
the week
not evident 
that readings 
were understood 
and/or not 
incorporated 
into discussion
4 or more online 
protocols not 
adhered to 
5 or less
Table 11-1.
Evaluation criteria 
for facilitating an
online/class discussion
(Dabbagh, 2000). 
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in ASP.NET. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
copy pages from pdf into new pdf; add or remove pages from pdf
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from PowerPoint in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
delete page in pdf document; delete pages from a pdf online
more tolerant of language informalities in postings than I do when
marking formal academic papers for term assignments.
Notice  how  Dabbagh  requires  more  frequent  posting  than
Levine, and further stipulates that the messages should be spread
through the week. The second set of criteria (responsiveness and
demonstration of understanding) illustrates the way the online
discussion is used to motivate students to complete the weekly
readings. Finally, the adherence to a list of online protocol cate-
gories links grading explicitly to quantitatively measurable student
behaviors. 
Both of the above instruction and marking schemes provide
extremely valuable guidance to learners and make clear and explicit
the requirements of the teacher. But what are the costs of such
evaluation? Assuming 20-30 students in an online learning class,
the weekly assessment proscribed by Dabbagh could be a very time
consuming activity. The amount of time required for assessment
depends, in part, on the tools available to the online teacher. A
good online learning system facilitates the display of the weekly
postings by each student. An exemplary system would incorporate
a number of active teacher agents that would
•  scan the postings for spelling and grammatical errors.
•  total the number of words.
•  allow the  display of preceding  or subsequent  postings and 
the  location  of  the  posting  in  its  thread  to  help  assess
“responsiveness.” 
•  graph the posting dates to allow quick visual identification of
the timeliness of each contribution.
•  present a grade book for easy entry of weekly scores.
•  when appropriate, provide assistance for the teacher to create
and automatically mark a variety of multiple choice, matching,
and fill-in-the-blank type questions for student self assessment.
•  automatically alert students when a grade has been posted or
altered.
Finally, it should be noted that creating a teaching presence is a
challenging and rewarding task, but cannot be a life-consuming
one. Research on assessment in distance education has shown that
285
Teaching in an Online Learning Conte
x
rapid feedback is important for both understanding and motivation
to complete courses (Rekkedal, 1983). However, the instantaneous
nature of online learning can lead to an unrealistic expectation by
learners that teachers will provide instant feedback and assessment
on submitted assignments. The virtual teacher has to lead a real
life, so setting and adhering to appropriate timelines helps students
hold realistic expectations and relieves the teacher of the unrealistic
expectation of providing instantaneous, 24-hour-a-day feedback.
In addition, online learning teachers must become ruthless time
managers, guarding against the tendency to check online activity
constantly, and to do everything to support the learners that can be
done,  rather  than  everything  that  can  be  done  within  the
constraints of a busy professional and personal life.
Some online teachers, especially those teaching at graduate levels,
may be uncomfortable with the prescriptive nature of the guidelines
presented above. These teachers are often more comfortable with
subjective  assessments  of  student  contributions  to  the  online
community and demonstration of their individual learning. This
type of assessment presents challenges to both students and teachers
as a result of the subjective nature of the assessment and the time
required to review all contributions made during a course in order
to assign a grade. For these reasons, a number of authors have
written about ways in which the student’s own postings can be used
as the basis for student assessment (Davie, 1989; Paulsen, 1995).
Typically, these self-reflective assessments require students at the end
of the course to illustrate both their contributions and evidence of
learning by composing a “reflection piece,” in which they quote
from their own posting to the course. They should be given guidance
to help them extract quotations that illustrate their contributions.
Obviously students who have not participated will not be able to
provide any transcript references from their own postings, and thus,
will  generally  receive  lower  evaluation  scores  on  this  project.
Alternatively, a vicariously participating student (i.e., a lurker) may
still be able to show learning by selective extraction of relevant
postings from other students.
In summary, giving directions for and modeling effective online
discourse is a critical component of creating effective teaching
presence. Assigning a portion of the assessment for the class to
participation is a common practice in online learning courses. If
286
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
participation is to be a formal and assessed requirement of the
course, then developing and implementing an explicit assessment
framework are essential, but potentially time-consuming, teacher
tasks. Some online learning teachers make this assessment into a
more reflective task by assigning students the task of using their
posting in the class conference as evidence of their understanding
of content concepts and intellectual growth during the class. This
type of assessed learning activity forces students to make quality
contributions, and then to reflect on them. This strategy moves the
locus of responsibility from the teacher to the student, a solution
that  can  save  teacher  time  while  contributing  to  student
understanding and metacognition.
Prov
i
s
i
on o
f
D
i
rect 
I
nstruct
i
on
In this final category, teachers provide intellectual and scholarly
leadership, and share their subject matter knowledge with students.
The  online  teacher must be able to  set  and communicate the
intellectual climate of the course, and model the qualities of a
scholar, including sensitivity, integrity, and commitment to the
unrelenting pursuit of truth. The students and the teacher often
have  expectations  that  the  teacher  will  communicate  content
knowledge. Ideally, this knowledge is enhanced by the teacher’s
personal interest, excitement, and in-depth understanding of the
content and its application in the context of formal study. The
cognitive apprenticeship model espoused by Collins, Brown, and
Newman  (1989),  Rogoff’s  (1990)  model  of  apprenticeship  in
thinking, and Vygotsky’s (1978) scaffolding analogies illustrate a
helping  role for teachers in providing instructional support to
students  from  their  position  of  greater  content  knowledge.
Although  many  authors  recommend  a  “guide  on  the  side”
approach  to  teaching  in  e-learning,  this  type  of  laissez  faire
approach diminishes a fundamental component of teaching and
learning in formal education. A key feature of social cognition and
constructivist learning models is the participation of an adult, or
expert, or more skilled peer who “scaffolds” a novice’s learning.
This role of the teacher involves direct instruction that makes use
of the subject matter and pedagogical expertise of the teacher. Some
theorists have argued that online teaching is unlike classroom-
287
Teaching in an Online Learning Conte
x
based  teaching,  in  that  “the  teacher  must  adopt  the  role  of
facilitator not content provider” (Mason 
&
Romiszowski, 1996, 
p. 447). This arbitrary distinction between facilitator and content
provider is troublesome. Garrison (1998), in a lively exchange,
focused on differentiating so-called teacher-centered and student-
centered  instruction,  makes  the  point  that  “the  self-directed
assumption of andragogy suggests a high degree of independence
that is often inappropriate from a support perspective and which
also ignores issues of what is worthwhile or what qualifies as an
educational experience
"
(p. 124). 
Gilly Salmon (2000) describes the role and functions of an “e-
moderator.” In this model, the teacher’s role in online conferencing
is that of facilitator of learning. Her description suggests that the e-
moderator does not require extensive subject matter expertise; she
writes “they need a qualification at least at the same level and in the
same topic as the course for which they are moderating” (p. 41).
Such minimal subject level competency seems to be less than that
expected  by  learners  and  peers  in  higher  education  settings.
Anderson et al. (2001) write 
we believe that there are many fields of knowledge, as well 
as attitudes and skills, that are best learned in forms of higher
education that require the active participation of a subject
matter expert in the critical discourse. This subject matter 
expert is expected to provide direct instruction by interjecting
comments, referring students to information resources, and
organizing activities that allow the students to construct the
content in their own minds and personal contexts. 
Often, students hold misconceptions that impair their capacity
to build more correct conceptions and mental schemata. The design
of effective learning activities leads to opportunities for students
themselves  to  uncover  these  misconceptions,  but  the  teacher’s
comments and questions as direct instruction are also invaluable.
Although teaching presence is most commonly set in synchro-
nous or asynchronous activities of the virtual classroom, it can also
be set through fixed formats such as access to “frequently asked
questions” databases or audio-, video-, or text-based presentations.
Direct instruction can also be provided through an instructor’s
288
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested