c# open pdf file in adobe reader : Delete pages of pdf online control SDK platform web page winforms .net web browser TPOL_book32-part1542

annotations of the scholarly work of others, including reviews of
articles, textbooks, or Web sites.
Finally, the teacher may be asked to provide direct instruction
on  technical  questions  about  access  to  Net-based  resources,
manipulation of the networking software, operation of other tools
or resources, and other technical concerns related to effective use of
subject related resources.
The Process o
fB
u
il
d
i
ng Teach
i
ng Presence
Salmon  (2000)  has  developed  a  model  for  e-moderators  that
demarcates the progression of tasks that the online teacher moves
through in the process of effectively moderating an online course.
The  process  begins  with  providing  students  with  access  and
motivation. In this stage, any technical or social issues that inhibit
participation are addressed, and students are encouraged to share
information  about  themselves  to  create  a  virtual  presence,  as
described above. In the second stage, Salmon suggests that the e-
moderator continues to develop online socialization by “building
bridges between cultural, social and learning environments” (p. 26).
In the third stage, referred as “information exchange,” Salmon
suggests that the teaching task moves to facilitating learning tasks,
moderating content-based discussions, and bringing to light student
misconceptions and misunderstandings. In the fourth stage, that of
“knowledge construction,” students focus on creating knowledge
artifacts and projects that collaboratively and individually illustrate
their understanding of course content and approaches. In the final
“development” stage, learners become responsible for their own
learning and that of their group by creating final projects, working
on  summative  assignments,  and  demonstrating  achievement  of
learning outcomes.
Salmon’s model provides a useful guide and planning tool for
online  learning teachers,  however it  should  not be considered
prescriptive. For example, students may be entering the online class
with a great deal of technical and social experience of the online
learning environment. In such cases, technical and social issues may
have been resolved some time ago. Alternatively, a heterogeneous
group may have some very sophisticated and experienced students,
289
Teaching in an Online Learning Conte
x
Delete pages of pdf online - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages pdf online; cut pages out of pdf online
Delete pages of pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
add and remove pages from pdf file online; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
and some novices new to the online learning environment. Busy
adult  students  may  be  anxious  to  avoid  what  they  see  as
unproductive “ice breakers” associated with Stages 1 and 2, and to
proceed to more content rich and potentially more meaningful
learning activities  associated  with later stages.  Thus, Salmon’s
model must be customized to the unique needs of each online
learning community. 
Qua
li
t
i
es o
f
the e
-
Teacher
This  chapter  concludes  with  a  discussion  of the  three sets of
qualities that define an excellent e-teacher. First and primarily, an
excellent e-teacher is an excellent teacher. They like dealing with
learners; they have sufficient knowledge of their subject domain;
they can convey enthusiasm both for the subject and for their task
as a learning motivator; and they are equipped with a pedagogical
(or androgogical) understanding of the learning process, and have
a set of learning activities at their disposal by which to orchestrate,
motivate, and assess effective learning. 
Beyond these generic teaching skills is a second set of technical
skills. One does not have to be a technical expert to be an effective
online teacher. However, one must have sufficient technical skill to
navigate  and  contribute  effectively  within  the  online  learning
context,  access  to  necessary  hardware,  and  sufficient  internet
efficacy (Eastin 
&
LaRose, 2000) to function within the inevitable
technical challenges of these new environments. Internet efficacy is
a personal sense of competence and comfort in the environment,
such that the need for basic troubleshooting skills does not send the
teacher into terror-filled incapacity. 
Finally, during this early period of creation and adoption of this
new learning context, an effective online learning teacher must
have the type of resilience, innovativeness, and perseverance typical
of all pioneers in unfamiliar terrain. 
Conc
l
us
i
on
This chapter has outlined the three major components of teacher
presence, and provided suggestions and guidelines for maximizing
290
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; reader extract pages from pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pages in pdf online; delete page from pdf file online
the effectiveness of the teaching function in online learning. I have
not provided a lengthy list of do’s and don’ts for online teaching in
a cookbook fashion; rather, I have attempted to provide a broad
theoretical model focusing on the three main tasks of the online
teacher. 
The context of online learning is still very much in a fluid and
changing state. The Web itself and the technologies that underlie it
are evolving rapidly to create a second Web—the “Semantic Web”
(Berners-Lee,  1999).  The  development  of  teacher  and  student
agents, the structuring of  content into learning objects (Wiley,
2000), and the formal expression of learning interactions (Koper,
2001), are creating a new educational Semantic Web that will
provide new capabilities and challenges for online teachers and
learners. As yet, we are at early stages in the technological and
pedagogical development of online learning. But the fundamental
characteristics  of  teaching  and  learning  and  the  three  critical
components  of  teaching  presence—design  and  organization,
facilitating discourse, and direct instruction—will continue to be
critical  components  of  teaching  effectiveness  in  both  online
learning and classroom instruction. 
R
e
f
erences 
American Heritage Dictionary(4th ed.). (2000). Boston: Houghton
Mifflin.
Anderson, T.  (2002). Getting  the mix right: An updated and
theoretical  rationale  for interaction. 
ITFORUM,
Paper  #63.
Retrieved October 13, 2003, from http://it.coe.uga.edu/itforum
/paper63/paper63.htm
Anderson, T., Garrison,  R., Archer, W., 
&
Rourke,  L. (N.d.).
Critical  thin
k
ing  in  a  te
x
 based  environment:  Computer
conferencing in higher education. Retrieved October 21, 2003,
from  the  University  of  Alberta  Academic  Technologies  for
Learning Web site: http://www.atl.ualberta.ca/cmc
Anderson, T., Rourke, L., Archer, W., & Garrison, R. (2001).
Assessing teaching  presence  in  computer  conferencing  tran-
scripts. Journal of the Asynchronous Learning Networ
k
, 5(2)
Retrieved  October  13,  2003,  from  http://www.aln.org
/publications/jaln/v5n2/v5n2_anderson.asp
291
Teaching in an Online Learning Conte
x
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET
delete pages from a pdf file; delete pages pdf file
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
cut pages from pdf; delete a page in a pdf file
Berners-Lee, T. (1999).Weaving the Web: The original design and
ultimate destiny of the World Wide Web by its inventor. San
Francisco: Harper.
Burge, E. J. (1994). Learning in computer conferenced contexts:
The learners’ perspective. Journal of Distance Education, 9(1),
19-43.
Campbell, K. (2002). Power, voice and democratization: Feminist
pedagogy and assessment in 
CMC
Educational Technology and
Society, 5(3) Retrieved Oct 13, 2003, from http://ifets.ieee.org
/periodical/vol_3_2002/campbell.html
CAREO
(Campus  Alberta Repository  of Educational Objects).
(2002). Retrieved October 12, 2003, from http://www.careo.org
Collins, A., Brown, J. S., 
&
Newman, S. E. (1989). Cognitive
apprenticeship:  Teaching the crafts  of reading, writing, and
mathematics. In L. B. Resnick (Ed.), Knowing, learning, and
instruction: Essays in honor of Robert Glaser (pp. 453-494).
Hillsdale, 
NJ
: Lawrence Erlbaum.
Dabbagh, N. (2000). Online-protocols. Retrieved October  13,
2003,  from  http://mason.gmu.edu/~ndabbagh/wblg/online-
protocol.html
Daniel, J., 
&
Marquis, C. (1988). Interaction and independence:
Getting the mix right. In D. Sewart, D. Keegan, 
&
B. Holmberg
(Eds.), Distance education: International perspectives(pp. 339-
359). London: Routledge.
Davie, L. (1989). Facilitation techniques for the online tutor. In 
R. Mason 
&
A. Kaye (Eds.), Mindweave: Communication, com-
puters, and distance education(pp. 74-85). Oxford: Pergamon
Press.
Eastin, M., 
&
LaRose, R. (2000). Internet self-efficacy and the
psychology of the digital divide. Journal of Computer Mediated
Communications, 6(1), Retrieved October 13, 2003, from http:
//www.ascusc.org/jcmc/vol6/issue1/eastin.html
Garrison, D. R. (1991). Critical thinking in adult education: A
conceptual  model  for  developing  critical  thinking  in  adult
learners. International Journal of Lifelong Education, 10(4),
287-303.
Garrison, D. R. (1998). Andragogy, learner-centeredness, and the
educational  transaction  at  a  distance. Journal of Distance
Education, 3(2), 123-127.
292
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
delete pages of pdf reader; delete page in pdf file
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pages pdf; delete page on pdf file
Garrison, D. R., 
&
Anderson, T. (2003). E-Learning in the 21st
century.London: Routledge.
Garrison, D. R., Anderson, T., 
&
Archer, W. (2000). Critical thinking
in text-based  environment:  Computer  conferencing  in  higher
education. The Internet and Higher Education, 2(2), 87-105. 
Garrison, D. R., 
&
Baynton, M. (1987). Beyond independence in
distance education: The concept of control. American Journal of
Distance Education, 1(3), 3-15.
Holmberg, B. (1989). Theory and practice of distance education.
London: Routledge.
Jiang,  M., 
&
Ting,  E. (2000).  A  study  of factors influencing
students’ perceived learning in a Web-based course environment.
International Journal of Educational Telecommunications, 6(4),
317-338.
Koper, R. (2001). Modeling units of study from a pedgagogical
perspective: The pedagogical meta-model behind 
EML.
Heerlen,
Netherlands: Open University of the Netherlands. Retrieved
October 13, 2003, from http://eml.ou.nl/introduction/docs/ped-
metamodel.pdf 
Laurillard,  D.  (1997). Rethin
k
ing  university  teaching:  A
framewor
k
for  the  effective  use  of  educational  technology.
London: Routledge.
Levine, S., (2002). Replacement myth. Retrieved October 13, 2003,
from http://www.listserv.uga.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0208&L=it
forum&D=0&P=12778
Mason, R., 
&
Romiszowski, A. J.  (1996). Computer-mediated
communication. In D. Jonassen (Ed.), The handboo
k
of research
for educational communications and technology (pp. 438-456).
New York: Simon 
&
Schuster Macmillan.
McPeck,  J.  (1990). Teaching critical thin
k
ing. New York:
Routledge.
MERLOT
(Multimedia Educational Resource for Learning and
Online Teaching). (N.d.). Retrieved October 12, 2003, from
http://www.merlot.org
Palloff, R., 
&
Pratt, K. (1999). Building learning communities in
cyberspace. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
293
Teaching in an Online Learning Conte
x
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. Explanation about transparency. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online. This
delete page numbers in pdf; delete pages from pdf in reader
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete page in pdf preview; delete pdf pages android
Paulsen,  M.  (1995).  Moderating  educational  computer  confer-
ences. In Z. Berge 
&
M. Collins (Eds.), Computer mediated
communication and the online classroom (pp. 81-90). Cresskill,
NJ
: Hampton Press. 
Prensky,  M.  (2000). Digital game-based learning. New  York:
McGraw-Hill.
Rekkedal T. (1983). The written assignments in correspondence
education.  Effects  of  reducing  turn-around  time. Distance
Education, 4,231-250.
Rogoff, B. (1990). Apprenticeship in thin
k
ing: Cognitive develop-
ment in social conte
x
t.New York: Oxford University Press.
Rourke, L., 
&
Anderson, T. (2002). Using peer teams to lead online
discussions. Journal of Interactive Media in Education, 1.
Retrieved October 13, 2003, from http://www-jime.open.ac.uk
/2002/1/rourke-anderson-02-1.pdf
Salmon, G. (2000). E-Moderating: The 
k
ey to teaching and learning
online. London: Kogan Page. 
Vygotsky, L. S. (1978). Mind in society, the development of higher
psychological processes. Cambridge, 
MA
: Harvard University
Press.
Wiley, D. (2000). Connecting learning objects to instructional design
theory:  A  definition,  a  metaphor,  and  a  taxonomy.  In 
D.  A. Wiley (Ed.), The instructional use of learning objects:
Online  version. Retrieved October 13, 2003, from http://
reusability.org/read/chapters/wiley.doc 
294
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
C H A P T E R   1 2
CA
LL
C
E
NT
ER
I
N D
I
STANC
E
E
DUCAT
I
ON
Andrew Woudstra, Colleen Huber, & Kerri Michalczuk
Athabasca University
I
ntroduct
i
on
In the past decade, call centers and contact centers have evolved to
become the front line for customer interaction in many types of
organizations. As such, they have a critical importance in the
implementation of organizational strategy (Evanson, Harker, 
&
Frei, 1998). Call centers have application in many industries of-
fering customer service, as they can provide customers a single ac-
cess point to diverse services. Many organizations use call centers
to solicit clients or customers for new sales or donations and contri-
butions. They can also be used to accomplish surveys of customer
satisfaction or public opinion. Call centers can be divided into
groups: those that focus on outgoing calling; those that focus on
incoming calls, such as customer information and help areas; and
those that are established to accomplish multiple tasks. 
In education,  call centers  can  be  useful  to  the educational
institution in many ways, ranging from simple provision of infor-
mation to prospective students, to fundraising, collection of survey
data,  and  even  provision  of  instructional  services  (Hitch 
&
MacBrayne, 2003). In distance education in particular, the call
center concept can be an effective communication tool, enabling
the institution to provide and improve service to students in many
areas, including instruction (Adria
&
Woudstra, 2001; Annand,
Huber, 
&
Michalczuk, 2002).
At Athabasca University, call centers are used in a number of
contexts, and show a good deal of potential for expansion and
consolidation,  to  take  advantage  of  economies  of  scale  in
technology. After a brief introduction to the place of call centers in
business  theory  and  practice,  this  chapter  uses  Athabasca
295
University’s practice and potential as an example in its exploration
of call centers and distance education.
Ca
ll
Centers 
i
n Organ
i
zat
i
ons
Call centers have particular significance in three areas: in customer
service  and  retention,  in  direct  marketing,  and  as  sources  of
management  information  and  customer  feedback  (Friedman,
2001). 
• Customer service and retention: In business operations, call
centers have become the primary contact point with customers,
and serve as the means by which the organization creates a long-
term  relationship  with  individual  customers  and  maintains
customer satisfaction. Customer satisfaction will generally lead
to  retention  and  to  word-of-mouth  recommendations.  In
distance education, call centers can help create the same type of
relationship. In the context of a university’s service standards for
processing  applications,  marking  assignments,  or  answering
calls and messages, call center staff are the consistent point of
contact with the student, and become their advocate. 
• Direct mar
k
eting opportunities:The support provided by a call
center is increasingly seen as a service that customers expect to
find integrated with product offerings, and to be available by
phone and on the Internet. This contact with the customer (who,
in the case of online or distance education, is a student) may
result in opportunities to help the student choose additional
products  (programs or  courses) and services (e.g., advising,
counseling, tutorial). 
• Source of management information and student or customer
feedbac
k
:A call center with good software accumulates a great
deal of information about customers or students. This infor-
mation is collected by analyzing call documentation data, or by
directly presenting questions to the customer or student. Dis-
tance education institutions should make the collection and
analysis of information a major call center goal.
296
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
Organ
i
zat
i
ona
l
Strategy and Ca
ll
Centers
Strategy and strategic decision-making have long been areas of
active academic and practitioner inquiry. Chandler (1962) studied
the development of American corporations in the early twentieth
century, and postulated that corporate structure was designed to
implement  strategy;  in  other  words,  that  structure  followed
strategy. Many other scholars followed with theories of their own.
Mintzberg and Lampel (1999) identify ten “schools” of theory
about strategy, and note that recent work has begun to cut across
these  schools  or  historical  perspectives.  Much  recent  work
(Eisenhardt,  1999;  Markides,  1999;  Pascale,  1999;  Kim 
&
Mauborgne, 1999) studies strategy as a dynamic that emerges from
the competitive environment, evaluates that environment in an
ongoing manner, and flexibly adjusts the corporate course when
necessary.  Organizations  compete on  the  edge,  adjusting their
deployment of employees and other resources as necessary strategic
changes are made (Hamel 
&
Prahalad, 1994). 
Over the past 20 to 25 years, experience has shown that infor-
mation technology is an increasingly important potential contri-
butor to an organization’s productivity, and that organizations
experience maximum value when information technology invest-
ments are strategically driven. Davenport and Short (1990), who
studied  the  relationship  between  information  technology  and
business process redesign, postulated an enabling link between, on
the one hand, the development of strategic vision and process
objectives, and on the other, successful, 
IT
-driven process redesign. 
Call centers provide an example of the application of these
concepts. Call center design has been enabled by the use of telecom-
munications technology and its ongoing integration with infor-
mation technology. Call center concepts are becoming integral to
the  redesign  of  business  processes  (particularly  informational
processes as distinguished from those focused on physical objects),
and where call center implementations are strategically driven and
aligned, their value to the organization is the greater.
It is important that objectives established for a call center sup-
port and further the organization’s strategic direction. For example,
a call center focused on routing telephone calls to the appropriate
staff member or department has a relatively narrow task; it will be
297
Call Centers in Distance Education
suited to an organization that needs to be able to give short, concise
answers to a high call volume. An inbound telemarketing call
center  focused  on  sales  will  allow  longer  calls,  focusing  on
minimizing waiting times and maximizing sales impact. However,
if the organization as a whole were strategically focused on the
creation of customer loyalty, the call center would be a primary
means to achieve that goal, and both of the examples above would
fall short in contributing to this corporate strategy (Holt, 2000).
Many call center managers are looking for ways to build cost-
effective,  competitive  operations  using  industry  benchmark
information. 
We’ve become obsessed in this industry with mass comparison.
We survey and benchmark and publish averages, quartiles and
percentages. These numbers get proclaimed as “industry
standards” that your call center should aspire to match.
(Cleveland 
&
Hopton, 2002). 
However, as these authors go on to note, surveys reveal that
“customers  are,  overall,  not  happy  with  service.”  Given  the
diversity of mission and function of call centers, it is likely that
what fits one will not fit all. It is much better to examine what the
organization  is trying to achieve,  and  to  build  processes and
systems that help achieve these goals in effective and efficient ways. 
Call centers can very well be a strategic asset for organizations,
as they can be used to strengthen customer relationships, and can
enable the organization to learn more about customers, so as to
serve them better. Adria and Chowdhury (2002) make a strong case
for using call centers to improve an organization’s ability to serve
its customers. They argue for empowerment of call center managers
and employees to enhance customer service, and they note that the
main responsibility for workers in a call center operation is to
maintain and enhance the reputation of the organization. That is,
the organization’s carefully developed customer service culture is at
risk during each customer interaction.
298
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested