C H H A A P T ER  1 1 3
SUPPO
R
T
I
NG AS
Y
NCH
R
ONOUS 
D
I
SCUSS
I
ONS AMONG ON
LI
N
E
LE
A
R
N
ER
S
Joram Ngwenya, David Annand, & Eric Wang
Athabasca University
I
ntroduct
i
on
Many  universities  now  offer  Internet-based  education.  Most
research  studies  have  determined  that   the  Web  is  an  effective
teaching  medium,  with  student  learning  outcomes  at  least
equivalent to those of classroom-based students (see, for example,
Gerhing, 1994; Golberg, 1997; McCollum, 1997).
Web-based  courses  generally  reflect  many  features  of  the
traditional academy: they generally have specified start and end
dates  and  limited  entry  points,  and  they  consist  of  cohorts of
students who proceed through each course at about the same pace.
This cohort model lends itself to a group-based, online learning
experience.  Commercial  online  learning  management  systems
(
LMS
s),  usually  assume  an  underlying  cohort-based  learning
model, and attempt to replicate many desirable features and activ-
ities derived from classroom-based learning contexts. This strategy,
in turn, enables increased interaction and knowledge construction
among learners. Not surprisingly, most research about online edu-
cation is informed by these cohort-based learning experiences (see,
for example, Arbaugh, 2001; Burke, 2001; McEwen, 2001; Rourke
&
Anderson, 2002). 
However, there is also a long tradition of open education that
addresses the needs of learners who for one reason or another do
not fit the classic mould of higher education. In large open and
distance education institutions, such as many of the “mega univer-
sities” described by Daniel (1997), or in smaller variants, like Atha-
basca University in Canada, the primary objective of the learning
model is to provide a greater degree of flexibility for students. In
the more flexible of these institutions, learners may enrol in courses
throughout the year (continuous enrolment) and proceed through
319
Delete pages from pdf without acrobat - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page on pdf file; delete pages pdf document
Delete pages from pdf without acrobat - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
cut pages from pdf; acrobat extract pages from pdf
these courses at their own pace. Assignments and examinations can
often be completed at any time and in any order. The relatively
unpaced nature of this “individualized” model appeals to learners
who have significant other responsibilities, such as full-time jobs
and families, or who, for some reason, require flexible alternatives
to acquire course credits to transfer into other external programs. 
These  two,  somewhat  divergent  views  of  higher  education
appear to  have  resulted in differing conceptions of the  relative
importance of mediated, two-way communication in the distance
education process, as discussed in the following section.
The 
I
nteract
i
on Debate
Holmberg (1983) conceptualized distance learning as essentially an
individual act of internalization. Thus, he saw instructional design
that supported learner autonomy and independence as important
for learners  at  a  distance.  He  asserted  that  distance  education
institutions needed to provide open access and unpaced courses,
and should not require group learning activities (pp. 64-65).
Keegan  (1990)  characterized  effective  distance  education
processes as “reintegrating” the teaching and learning acts; that is,
replicating as many of the attributes of face-to-face communication
as  possible,  yet  maintaining  learner  autonomy.  Interpersonal
communication at a distance did not need to be limited to more
direct forms of instructor-student interaction, such  as telephone
conversations  or  teleconferencing,  but  could  also  be  recreated
through appropriate design and use of printed instructional mate-
rials. In this instance, reintegration occurred when printed learning
materials  were  easily  understood,  anticipated  potential  learner
problems,  provided  carefully  constructed  course  objectives  and
content, and contained ample practice questions and related feed-
back.  Like  Holmberg  (1983),  Keegan  considered  the  more
important characteristics of adult distance education to be learner
independence and personal responsibility for educational outcomes
and processes. 
However,  not  all  writers  agree  that  learner  autonomy  and
independence continued to be the chief hallmarks of adult learning
after  the  advent  of  various  forms  of  online  communication.
320
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
delete pages from a pdf file; add and delete pages in pdf
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
delete blank pages in pdf; delete pdf pages in preview
Garrison  (1988)  expressed  the  need  for  a  balanced  approach
between  teacher-centered  relationships  found  in  face-to-face
education, and to a lesser extent, traditional distance education,
and  the  tendency  to  stress  learner-centered  relationships in  the
emerging electronic learning environment. The ability of instruc-
tors and learners to communicate openly and collaboratively, and
to determine the appropriate, delicate balance between the needs,
values, and perspectives of both parties were particularly strong
and  promising  features  of  the  advent  of  interactive  electronic
communication technologies (pp. 125-126).
Garrison (1989) argued that dialogue and debate were essential
for  learning,  because  these  forms  of  two-way  communication
allowed learners to negotiate and structure personally meaningful
knowledge. Teaching necessarily transmitted societal knowledge,
but a rounded learning experience needed to foster critical analysis
processes in order to bring personal perspectives to bear and create
new understanding for both the teacher and student (pp. 7, 19). 
Holmberg (1990) took exception to these assertions. He argued
that the vast majority of distance education continued to be based
on  a  correspondence  model,  characterized  by  student  indepen-
dence, separation in space and time, and the use of printed material
as the primary  means of  instruction. This model could be sup-
ported with various means of two-way communication, depending
in part on financial considerations, and in part on instructor and
student preferences. Mediated communication had always been a
primary characteristic of distance education, he maintained, but
merely supplemented the traditional correspondence-based model
of distance education. As a result, the nature of distance education
may have evolved,  but it had  not been  revolutionized with the
introduction of online communication technologies. 
Garrison  and  Shale  (1990)  responded  that  Holmberg’s
conception of distance education was deficient, because it relied on
enabling technologies to define the phenomenon. Correspondence
study, they argued, had arisen as a result of technological inno-
vations—the mail and telephone systems. These systems were being
replaced by newer, more effective,  mediated two-way electronic
communication  systems.  A  more  integrative,  technologically
independent view of distance education, one that focused on the
321
Supporting Asynchronous Discussions among Online Learners
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
delete page in pdf file; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
delete pdf pages; delete pages from pdf acrobat
essential educational feature of learning, was needed. Garrison and
Shale defined this feature to be sustained, two-way communication
between instructor and learner. 
Various  writers,  including  Jonassen,  Davidson,  Collins,
Campbell, and Banaan-Haag (1995), developed this conception of
online  learning  even  further.  To  them,  sustained  two-way
asynchronous communication not only enables greater instructor-
learner communication, but most importantly, enables the social
construction  of  knowledge  among  learners  at  a  distance.  This
constructive  effect  occurs  when  online  learning  environments
require, among others, “negotiation of meaning and reflection on
what has been learned” (p. 21).
This relatively distinct divide between theorists appears to be
essentially unresolved at present. One view (represented by both
Holmberg  and  Keegan)  conceptualizes  the  process  of  distance
education as  involving  primarily flexible, unpaced learning that
facilitates  learner independence  and  autonomy. Others (such as
Garrison) conceive the distance education process as now being
transformed into one of sustained two-way communication, where
significant, frequent interaction between instructor and learner and
among learners  is the  essential,  enabling  learning  feature.  It  is
noteworthy that, in practice, this dichotomy appears to manifest
itself in the degree of pacing incorporated into course and program
structures. This factor is discussed further in the next section.
Techno
l
ogy and Types o
fI
nteract
i
ons 
i
n On
li
ne 
L
earn
i
ng 
E
nv
i
ronments
The means of interaction among two or more people depends on
their relative locations in time and space, as illustrated in Table 13-1.
Using this schema, and by definition, distance learning can only
take place in quadrants 2 and 4. It is in these areas that teaching
and learning  activities occur  in  different places, requiring  some
form  of  technological  mediation.  Technologies  that  facilitate
synchronous  online  learning  (e.g.,  desktop  video  conferencing,
chat, and audioconferencing) fall into quadrant 2 (different place,
same  time).  Asynchronous  technologies  (e.g.,  computer  confer-
encing, e-mail) fall into quadrant 4 (different place, different time). 
322
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
delete pdf pages in reader; delete page from pdf online
323
Supporting Asynchronous Discussions among Online Learners
Table 13-1. 
Types of interaction in
learning environments.
Table 13-2.
Types of interactions 
in online learning
environments.
Same
place
Same
time
1
4
Different
place
Different
time
3
2
Same
pace
Same
time
1
4
Different
pace
Different
time
3
2
However,  this representation  does  not take into account  the
relatively paced or unpaced nature of online courses. “Place” is
extraneous to the analysis if only forms of communication that
must  be  used  among  physically  dispersed  individuals  are
considered. As a result, this variable can be replaced with “Pace,”
to gives us the more descriptive schema of online learning shown in
Table 13-2.
For  instance,  synchronous  forms  of  technology-mediated
communication,  such  as  desktop  video  conferencing,  generally
occur in quadrant 1 (same pace, same time). Asynchronous forms
of  communication,  such  as  computer  conferencing,  occur  in
quadrant 3 (same pace, different time). 
In  both  paced  and  unpaced  online  learning  environments,
various types of interpersonal, mediated communications are pos-
sible: student to student, student to class, instructor to class, and
student  to  instructor.  However,  Table  13-3  illustrates  that,  in
practice, there are relatively few forms of electronic technology that
are both supportable by the learning institution and suitable for the
unpaced online learning environment.
Tables  13-2  and  13-3  illustrate  that  technologies  exist  to
facilitate all forms of synchronous and asynchronous interaction in
paced,  online  learning  environments—the  type  of  interaction
envisioned by Garrison (1989, 1990) and Jonassen et al. (1995).
However,  facilitating  interaction  among learners  in  an  unpaced
online setting is still problematic, despite rapid advances in techn-
ology  and  online  learning  management  systems,  because  most
online  learning  systems  have  evolved  from  classroom-based
educational models  and group-based support systems. Although
online  technologies  can be  adapted  to  facilitate some forms of
interaction—for  instance  e-mail  to  allow  learner-learner  com-
munication—organizational and systems problems engendered by
the rolling nature of student registrations may make these practices
difficult to implement. 
Presumably, other means, such as the use of carefully structured
instructional material (whether online or printed) must be used at
present  to  provide  meaningful  unpaced  learning  experiences  to
students at a distance. These strategies are very similar to those
promoted  by  Holmberg  (1983,  1990)  and  Keegan  (1990).  The
failure to distinguish among relative degrees of pacing in distance
education courses or programs, and the organizational and learning
system  differences that  result,  may account for  varying  concep-
tualization of the appropriate means to achieve “interaction” in the
distance education literature.
As a result of this analysis, it also seems clear that unpaced
online learning must address some important practical challenges.
The balance of this chapter describes the development of an online
learning system prototype designed to facilitate learner-instructor
interaction, and a limited form of learner-learner interaction, in an
unpaced  online  environment.  The  system  appears  to  provide
learners  with  maximal  amounts  of  flexibility,  yet  to  rectify  an
324
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
Student 
to student
Paced
e-mail
telephone/pager/
voice mail
online chat
CMC
325
Supporting Asynchronous Discussions among Online Learners
Student 
to instructor
Instructor 
to class
Student 
to class
online chat
telephone/pager/
voice mail
e-mail
teleconference
videoconference
class e-mail
discussion board
computer
conferencing
teleconference
desktop audio/
video conferencing
class e-mail
discussion boards
computer
conferencing
telephone/pager/
voice mail
course Web site
notices
class e-mail
2
none
Unpaced
none
1
1.  Such technologies are not available, unless students are apprised by the
institution of the means to contact other students; for example, given e-mail
addresses and telephone numbers. In practice, this is difficult.
2.  It is difficult in practice to determine the e-mail addresses of all active
students in unpaced online learning environments.
E
nabling online technology
Interaction 
type
Table 13-3.
Technologies that
facilitate interactions 
in online learning
environments.
important practical gap in unpaced online learning: the means to
communicate effectively with peers and instructors, and thereby
facilitate group-based learning. However, many of the features of
this  system  can  also  be  applied  to  paced  online  learning
environments,  thereby  addressing  some  needs  of  learners  and
instructors that are common across all online learning models.
The 
AS
K
S
System
Collaboration  among  students  in  an  unpaced  online  learning
environment is difficult because, by definition, they do not belong
to a cohort, and their courses are designed to be self-paced. As a
result, even two students who begin a course on the same day can
quickly be at different points within it. Interactions among learners
cannot be easily facilitated, monitored, or evaluated. Furthermore,
increased  interaction  in  unpaced  online  environments  can
significantly increase costs to the institution (Annand, 1999).
The 
ASKS
(asynchronous 
k
nowledge sharing)  prototype  is
designed to overcome these difficulties. It uses discussion boards
with  capabilities  characteristic  of  most  group  decision  support
systems (Nunamaker, Dennis, Valacich, Vogel, 
&
George, 1991).
Learners and instructors access the system directly via the Web. The
main  student  screen  is  divided  into  three  areas,  as  shown  in 
Figure 13-1: knowledge sharing topics in the left-hand pane, the
326
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
Figure 13-1.
Student main screen.
main menu in the top part of the right-hand pane, and the topic
headings just below the main menu. 
Each knowledge sharing topic has four parts: a closed or open
file folder icon just to the left of the topic, the topic itself, the
number of entries created by a student for the related topic (shown
in parentheses), and a trash can icon showing the number of entries
that have been deleted. Each knowledge sharing topic is described
briefly, in a phrase similar to the subject line in an e-mail message. 
When the file folder icon for an applicable topic is opened, the
individual student’s entries related to the topic are displayed in the
right-hand pane. In this case, six entries have been made by the
student related to the topic, “System Advantages.” Each response
to the knowledge sharing topic is accompanied by the date an entry
was entered or last modified, the size (in kilobytes) of the response,
a short description of  the entry,  and a link to a more detailed
explanation. 
Topic submissions can be created by clicking the “Compose”
button.  This  action  brings  up  the  editing  screen  shown  in 
Figure 13-2. 
This screen has the look and feel of most e-mail  systems. A
subject  line  provides  a  brief  description  of  the  response.  The
“Explanation”  area  is  similar  to  the  main  body  of  an  e-mail.
Students may compose their detailed responses to the given topic
here, if they wish. If no explanation is entered, the system default
reports “No explanation, point self-explanatory.”
327
Supporting Asynchronous Discussions among Online Learners
Figure 13-2.
Topic editing screen.
A student cannot view others’ responses to a knowledge topic
until they have made and submitted their own. When entries are
submitted, they are accessible to the instructor for reviewing, and
unavailable to the originating student for further editing. Other
students  cannot view these  submissions  until the  instructor has
reviewed them. 
The last item in the right-hand pane of the student main screen
(Figure 13-1) is the “Instructor’s Comments” section. If the instruc-
tor has evaluated an entry, a “new mail” icon and the date of the
evaluation appear in this section of the originating student’s screen.
Entries that have been rejected by the instructor appear with a red
X
” icon. Other possible instructor comments are “Not sent to
instructor yet,” for entries that have not yet been submitted for
evaluation, and “Awaiting evaluation,” for entries that have been
submitted but not reviewed by the instructor.
Clicking the date in the “Instructor’s Comments” column opens
the screen shown in Figure 13-3.
This screen provides each student with the instructor’s feedback
on their submissions in a private workspace. If the instructor is not
satisfied with the overall quality of submissions from a particular
student, they can provide hints to the student. The “Hints” button
is hidden until the instructor has commented on all entries made by
the  student.  Clicking  on  this  button  brings  up  an  instructor
feedback screen like that shown in Figure 13-4. 
328
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
Figure 13-3.
Instructor’s comments
on an individual entry.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested