c# open pdf file in adobe reader : Delete pages of pdf application SDK cloud windows winforms html class TPOL_book38-part1548

C H H A A P T ER  1 1 4
LIBR
A
RY
SUPPO
R
T FO
R
ON
LI
N
E
LE
A
R
N
ER
S: 
E-RE
SOU
R
C
E
S, 
E-
S
ER
V
I
C
E
S AND
TH
E
HUMAN FACTO
R
Kay Johnson, Houda Trabelsi, & Tony Tin
Athabasca University
I
ntroduct
i
on
The growth in online learning or e-learning, in which education is
delivered and supported through computer networks such as the
Internet, has posed new challenges for library services. E-learners
and traditional learners now have access to a universe of digital
information through  the  information  superhighway.  New infor-
mation  and  communications  technologies, as well  as  new  edu-
cational  models,  require  librarians  to  re-evaluate  the  way  they
develop, manage and deliver resources and services.
Historically,  librarians  have  sought  to  provide  services  to
distance learners that are equivalent to those available to on-campus
learners (Slade & Kascus, 1998), and this aspiration is grounded in
the philosophical frameworks of the Canadian Library Association’s
Guidelines  for  Library  Support  of  Distance  and  Distributed
Learning in Canada (2000) (http://www.cla.ca/about/distance.htm)
and the Association of College and Research Libraries’Guidelines
for Distance Learning Library Services (2000) (http://www.ala.org/
Content/NavigationMenu/
ACRL
/Standards_and_Guidelines/Guidel
ines_for_Distance_Learning_Library_Services.htm). 
Both the Canadian and the American Guidelines recognize that
distance learners frequently do not have direct access to the full range
of library services and materials, and that in this situation, the goal
of equity makes it necessary that librarians services that are more
“personalized”  than  might  be  expected  on  campus.  The  library
literature provides a rich record of service models and best practices,
and there has been an explosion in publication as librarians consider
ways to support learners in a networked environment (Slade, 2000).
349
Delete pages of pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
add and remove pages from a pdf; delete page from pdf file
Delete pages of pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page on pdf; delete page in pdf preview
What do e-learners  need  from  librarians?  Suggestions  advo-
cating change in librarians’ roles in support of distance learning in
the information age appear throughout the literature:  librarians
“must  assert  themselves  as  key  players in  the learning  process
thereby  changing  their  roles  from  information  providers  to
educators”  (Cooper  &  Dempsey,  1998);  they  have  become
providers of technical support (Hulshof, 1999); and they have been
transformed  from  “information  gatekeepers”  to  “information
gateways”  (Haricombe,  1998).  Lippincott  (2002)  advocates
librarian involvement in learning communities: “The librarian can
shift the focus from explaining library resources to meeting the
ongoing  information  needs  of  the  students  in  the  broad infor-
mation environment” (p. 192).
In  responding  to the  need to provide  ongoing online  library
support, librarians have worked at translating what they do in a
traditional  library  into  virtual  or  digital  environments,  while
customizing their services and resources for e-learners. Traditionally,
libraries  offer  circulation  services,  interlibrary  loans,  course
reserves, an information desk, a reference desk, and library instruc-
tion.  To  serve  learners  connected  to  their  institutional  library
primarily  through a computer network, librarians are providing
remote access to, and electronic delivery of, library resources, and
are using communication technologies to deliver electronic reference
services and instructional support. 
When  we  speak  of  providing  support  to  e-learners,  we  are
referring to a wider community of learners than the term “student”
suggests.  An  academic  library’s  learners  may  include  students,
faculty, staff, researchers, and so on. The library is seen as a source
of training  and  guidance  to  a  community of learners  who  are
concerned with navigating the complexities of locating and using
digital  resources  and  services.  Moreover,  the  move  toward  an
online environment has resulted in a shift from the systematic one-
to-one information flow of the past to a new model in which the
users and the providers of information are able to relate in a many-
to-many,  dynamic  relationship.  For  example,  in  the  traditional
model, a librarian provides a bridge between learners and infor-
mation providers by selecting and cataloguing resources and by
providing assistance with these resources. In the new model, the
library serves as a facilitator by offering ongoing support enabling
learners  to  interact  and  exchange  knowledge  with  others,  to
350
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pages from a pdf reader; delete pages from pdf online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pages pdf online; delete pages of pdf
communicate  directly  with the  publishers and vendors of infor-
mation resources, and to participate in a collaborative endeavor to
make  available  rich  collections  of  online  scholarly  information
resources. 
This  chapter  examines  how  libraries  are  responding  to  the
challenges  of  delivering  core  services  to  e-learners.  We  look  at
library practices and technologies being applied in the construction
of virtual libraries. We also consider challenges and opportunities
virtual libraries bring to the support of e-learners, as well as the
importance of providing support within a collaborative environ-
ment, which stresses human factors, such as communication and
interaction.
De
fi
n
i
ng the V
i
rtua
l
Li
brary
Gapen (1993) defines the virtual library as 
the concept of remote access to the contents and services of
libraries and other information resources, combining an on-site
collection of current and heavily used materials in both print
and electronic form, with an electronic network which provides
access to, and delivery from, external worldwide library and
commercial information and knowledge sources. (p. 1) 
Additional  terms  for  the  virtual  library  include  the  “digital
library,” the “electronic library,” and the “library without walls.”
Many libraries are hybrids, providing virtual access to electronic
resources and services, while maintaining and supporting use of a
physical collection housed in a library building.
With the tremendous growth of the Internet, e-learners have
access to an overwhelming range of information sources available
at the click of a mouse: library resources; government information;
news  sites;  advertising;  even  whole  Web  sites  devoted to  Elvis
sightings, crop circles, and 
JFK
conspiracy theories. Librarians have
traditionally selected and organized resources with great care. In
building virtual libraries, librarians have the opportunity to provide
e-learners  with direction  and  to  rescue  them  from  information
overload. A virtual library can link e-learners to library catalogues,
licensed  journal  databases,  electronic  book  collections,  selected
351
Library Support for Online Learners
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete pages on pdf file; delete pdf pages ipad
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
C:\test1.pdf") Dim pdf2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\test2.pdf") Dim pageindexes = New Integer() {1, 2, 4} Dim pages = pdf.DuplicatePage(pageindexes
delete pdf pages reader; delete pages pdf
Internet resources, electronic course reserves, and tutorials, and to
forums for communication and interaction  with  librarians.  The
virtual library permits e-learners to access library and networked
resources  and  services  anytime  and  anywhere  that  an  Internet
connection and computing equipment are available.  
The 
L
andscape o
fLi
brary 
R
esources
Technology offers opportunities to be innovative, as the following
discussion of electronic resources and services demonstrates, but it
is important to bear in mind that not all e-learners are equal when
it comes to access to computing equipment; the availability, speed,
and stability of Internet connections; or the information skills that
are needed to make optimum use of virtual libraries. 
Access  to  print-based  library  materials  continues  to  be
important, because  not all of  the information  resources  that e-
learners need are available in electronic format: many of our most
valuable  research  materials  are  still  print-based.  The  Digital
Library Federation and the Council on Library and Information
Resources commissioned a survey of the use of print and electronic
scholarly information resources at institutions of higher education
across the United States. The survey found that, although almost
half of undergraduates report using electronic resources all or most
of the time for their coursework, this was the case for only 35.2%
of graduate students. Only 34.7% of faculty indicated that they use
electronic resources all or most of the time for their research, and
just 22.7% said this of their teaching (Friedlander, 2002, Tables 23,
17, 
&
20).
Although there has been a shift away from purchasing print
materials to be housed in a physical building and toward providing
access to licensed digital resources made available over a computer
network, librarians continue to work to resolve issues pertaining to
distance delivery of resources that are unavailable in digital format.
Online catalogues and indexing and abstracting systems provide e-
learners with convenient access to bibliographic information about
valuable  scholarly  documents.  When  those  documents  are  not
available  in  full-text  form  online,  a  demand  is  generated  for
delivery from a library’s print collection or from the collections of
other  libraries  through  interlibrary  loans.  Typical  solutions  for
352
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
delete a page from a pdf acrobat; reader extract pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET PDF - How to Delete Text from PDF File in VB.NET. VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
delete pages in pdf reader; delete pages from pdf document
delivery of non-digital formats include the use of mail and courier
services, the establishment of collections at designated sites, and the
negotiation of agreements with other libraries through consortia.
Given that a growing number of learners are accessing library
collections online, librarians are working to develop an integrated
approach to providing access to electronic resources that facilitates
retrieval and reduces confusion. A library Web site can function as
an  information  gateway,  an  entry  point  to  a  range  of  online
resources, with key components being the library catalogue and
journal databases. Most online catalogues permit the integration of
electronic books and electronic journals, enabling learners to locate
items from digital and physical collections with one search. User
services—such as the ability to check due dates, renew materials,
and request materials online—are also provided. Gateways may
also  organize  collections  and  incorporate  directories  like  that
provided by Athabasca University’s Journal Databases: List Data-
bases by Subject page (http://library.athabascau.ca/journals/subject
.htm).
Librarians have become increasingly creative in enhancing their
Web  sites.  Because  not  all  e-learners  have  physical  access  to
reference tools—the quick fact-finding tools that are the staple of
library  collections—libraries  can  perform  a  valuable  service  by
providing  pointers  to  online  versions.  Athabasca  University
Library’s  Digital  Reference  Centre  (http://library.athabascau.ca
/drc), for example, offers a digital version of an academic library’s
reference collection, including almanacs and directories, atlases and
maps,  data  and  statistics,  and  dictionaries  and  encyclopedias.
Librarians  select  quality  Internet  resources  to  help  e-learners
navigate  the  Web.  For  example,  the  British  Open  University
Library’s 
ROUTES
database  contains  quality-assessed,  course-
related  Internet  resources  “selected  by  course  teams  and  the
Library’s Information Specialists” (http://routes.open.ac.uk).
As  libraries  work to  enhance  their  presence  on  the  Web,  a
growing number are investigating the potential of electronic course
reserves  (e-reserves).  The traditional  course reserves  desk  of an
academic library, with its limited copies, short loan periods, and
high  late fines, can  be a considerable  source  of  frustration  for
students.  In  the  e-reserves  model,  the  library  makes  available,
through the World Wide Web, items that faculty have selected and
“placed on reserve” for students in a particular course.  San Diego
353
Library Support for Online Learners
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
delete page from pdf file online; acrobat remove pages from pdf
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
delete pages from a pdf online; delete blank pages in pdf online
State University (
SDSU
)  pioneered e-reserves in the  early  1990s
(http://ecr.sdsu.edu  ). 
SDSU
uses Docutek’s 
ER
es,  a  system  that
provides  access  to  course  readings,  chat  rooms,  and  bulletin
boards. 
Many  other  libraries  have  initiated  their  own  projects.
Electronic delivery of course reserve material has become a hot
topic in the library literature (Butler, 1996; Soete, 1996; Algenio,
2002; Wilson, 2002; Calvert, 2000; Lowe 
&
Rumery, 2000). The
Association of Research Libraries (
ARL
) maintains the Electronic
Reserves Listserv, and an archive of the discussion can be accessed
on the Web (http://www.cni.org/Hforums/arl-ereserve).
Most e-reserves operate on a password-protected model: one
must be affiliated with the institution, or even registered in the
course, to view course reserves. A typical e-reserve solution is to
employ  an  electronic  course  reserve  module  that  permits  full
integration  with  the  library’s  online  catalogue.  Content  in  e-
reserves  databases  varies.  Scanning  and  mounting  readings  in
portable document format (
PDF
) is time-consuming and requires
copyright  clearance.  Other  options  for  content  include  incor-
porating  institution-produced  materials  (e.g.,  lecture  notes  and
video or audio clips), using licensed digital resources through direct
linking  to  items  by  means  of  a  persistent 
URL
,  and  including
selected resources freely available through the World Wide Web.
Librarians can take a creative, pro-active approach to e-reserves.
Athabasca  University  Library  has  developed  a  platform  for  e-
reserves that operates on a somewhat different model than do other
e-reserves  systems.  The  Digital  Reading  Room  (http://library
.athabascau.ca/drr) offers a digital solution for course readings and
supplementary materials. An in-house storage and retrieval system
was developed for the 
DRR
using open source software. The model
operates along the principle of open access to collection creation
tools, thus permitting course content creators, educational media
developers,  and  librarians  to  develop  a  multidisciplinary
knowledge database. 
Each course in the Digital Reading Room has a Digital Reading
File (
DRF
). The licensed contents, such as journal database articles,
require  authentication  through  the  Library’s  proxy  server,
permitting only the Athabasca University community of users to
access them; non-licensed resources, such as Web sites, are freely
available to the public. A search engine permits e-learners to search
354
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
across the 
DRF
s, providing a  multidisciplinary aspect to  course
reserves  that  is  not  typically  encountered.  By  encouraging  the
inclusion  of  resources  in  a  variety  of  formats,  including  text,
graphics, video, audio, simulations, and games, the 
DRR
supports
 wide  range  of  learning  objectives  and  styles.  The 
DRR
accommodates the inclusion of non-digital resources by providing
e-learners with a means to request them from the Library. The 
DRR
is being developed using metatags that conform to the 
IEEE LOM
standards and use the CanCore implementation guidelines to insure
consistency and search capability across database collections such
as 
MERLOT
(http://www.merlot.org).
Managing the remote access and authentication issues involved
in making digital resources available has become a significant area
of  support  to  users  of  the  electronic  library  (Hulshof,  1999).
Librarians may be called upon to respond to questions concerning
log-in and password information, browser configuration, software
installation, and a range of troubleshooting needs. Access problems
are hugely frustrating for e-learners, and must be resolved quickly.
Ensuring  that  front-line  library  staff  are  adequately  trained,
providing  clear  instructions  on  the  library’s  Web  site,  and
coordinating support activities with computing services personnel
can contribute to effective technical support. E-learners also benefit
from having a variety of means of contacting the library, including
e-mail, Web forms, and a toll-free telephone number.
Li
brary Serv
i
ces: Cha
ll
enges and Opportun
i
t
i
es
R
e
f
erence
E-learners require more than access to e-resources. Traditionally, a
reference librarian acts as an additional type of resource, one who
can be counted upon to provide expertise in making sense of library
systems and research tools, and to offer a helping hand along that
often slippery path known as the research process. Virtual library
users face additional challenges in mining relevant information out
of  a  computer  system  that  “obstinately”  returns  zero  hits  in
response to a query that does not match the character strings in its
database files.
355
Library Support for Online Learners
The  most  common  means  of  providing  electronic  reference
services  to  remote  users  has  been  e-mail,  the  advantages  and
disadvantages of which have been well documented in the literature
(Slade,  2000).  The  around-the-clock  and  around-the-world
accessibility  of  e-mail  allows  users  to  connect  with  librarians
beyond the walls of library buildings and outside the usual hours
of operation.  E-mail provides a written  record  of requests and
responses, permits the electronic transmission of search results, and
allows librarians time  to reflect  on  requests.  One  of  the  most
serious concerns about e-mail reference services is their impact on
the  traditional  face-to-face  reference  interview,  particularly  the
absence of the verbal and non-verbal cues that typically assist a
librarian in effectively responding to a question.
Hulshof  (1999)  identifies  three  issues  related  to  the  use  of
electronic communication in serving virtual patrons (e-learners):
immediacy, intricacy, and interaction. Because it is so easy for a
learner to send a request electronically and have it arrive at the
library instantly, there is a perception that the librarian’s response
will  be  as  immediate. The learner  may  become  frustrated, not
realizing that the process of locating information and developing a
response takes the librarian just as long when the request is made
electronically as when it is made in person or in any other way. The
more intricate or complex the request, the longer it will take for the
librarian to clarify it and respond appropriately: a series of e-mail
messages may be required, which will further reduce the immediacy
of the e-mail request. Immediacy and intricacy relate to the lack of
interaction: the opportunity to discuss and clarify inquiries that
occurs in person or over the telephone is not so easily accommo-
dated by e-mail.
There  are  ways  to  deal  with  some  of  these  issues.  A  well-
designed reference Web form, such as that provided on the Ask 
AU
Library:  Ask  about  a  Research  Topic  Web  page  (http://library
.athabascau.ca/contacts/refinquiry.htm),  which  encourages  e-
learners  to  include  full  identifying  and  course  information,  to
describe clearly their research problem and search terminology, and
to state the parameters of the assignment, can clarify requests for
librarians and reduce the need to e-mail back and forth (Sloan,
1998).  Automated  replies,  which  are  sent  out  by  the  e-mail
program in response to the receipt of a message, can be used to
356
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
reassure e-learners that their messages are being received, and can
let them know what to expect in terms of service. 
E-mail reference service can be enhanced and supplemented with
additional technologies that raise the level of interaction with real-
time or live communication. Chat technology allows e-learners and
librarians to send text messages back and forth instantly, using a
form of communication  that  is  familiar  to most  Internet  users.
There have been a number of library experiments with Web contact
center software, which is modeled on the private sector’s online
solution  to  providing  customer  support.  Web  contact  center
software provides a higher level of interaction than does basic chat
software, allowing for queuing and routing of messages, as well as
enabling  librarians  to  “push”  Web  pages  to  users  (Kimmel  &
Heise, 2001; McGlamery & Coffman, 2000). Providing e-learners
with  a  toll-free  telephone  number  remains  an  effective  and
convenient  reference  services  strategy,  particularly  for  intricate
inquiries. The telephone reference interview works best when both
librarian  and  e-learner  are  working  in  front  of  computers
connected to the Internet.
I
nstruct
i
on
E-learners  are  frequently  silent  and  invisible  as  they  search  and
explore a library’s online resources, and they do not have the same
access that on-campus learners have to formal library instruction
sessions. With the array of digital resources available to them, the
multiplicity  of  interfaces  and  search  tools,  and  the  need  for
evaluation and critical thinking when using the Internet for research,
“information literacy” skills are a must-have for e-learners. Infor-
mation literacy refers to competencies with information sources in a
variety of  formats.  According to  the  Association  of College  and
Research Libraries (2001), 
an information literate individual is able to 
• Determine the extent of information needed
• Access the needed information effectively and efficiently
• Evaluate information and its sources critically
• Incorporate selected information into one’s knowledge base
• Use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose
357
Library Support for Online Learners
• Understand the economic, legal, and social issues
surrounding the use of information, and access and use
information ethically and legally
Supporting the integration of information literacy skills training
into  the  core  curriculum  has  become  an  important  issue  for
libraries (Slade, 2000). As an extension of their traditional role of
providing library instruction sessions and developing instructional
materials, librarians are designing online tutorials and courses that
promote  information  literacy  and  encourage  active  learning.
Particularly  fine  examples  are  the  University  of  Texas  System
Digital Library’s 
TILT
—Te
x
as Information Literacy Tutorial (http:
//tilt.lib.utsystem.edu); and Utah Academic Library Consortium’s
Internet  Navigator (http://medlib.med.utah.edu/navigator), a
multi-institutional online course developed by a team of librarians
and  Web  developers.  The  British  Open  University  Library  has
developed 
SAFARI
(http://www.open.ac.uk/safari), a freely avail-
able interactive tutorial, as well as an information literacy course
called MOSAIC (Ma
k
ing Sense of Information in the Connected
Age) (Needham, Parker, 
&
Baker, 2001).
Many  libraries  provide  instruction  to  e-learners  by  making
information  available  on  their  Web  pages,  including  frequently
asked questions, library glossaries, research guides, and “how-to”
pages.  Athabasca  University  Library’s  Digital  Reference  Centre
integrates resources with contextual instruction and provides links
to instructional resources, including a detailed guide to Internet
searching  that  encourages  e-learners  to  think  critically  about
Internet resources (http://library.athabascau.ca/drc/intro.htm), and
library  research  guides  such  as  the AU Library Guide to
Researching Topics in Women’s Studies(http://library.athabascau
.ca/help/wmst/intro_wmst.htm). 
Online tutorials usually operate on a  model  in which the e-
learner interacts in isolation with a computer. Their effectiveness
can  be enhanced by  the  addition  of  more interactive  forms of
instruction.  The  librarians  at  the  Florida  Distance  Learning
Reference and  Referral Center, for  example, have experimented
with chat software to simulate a virtual classroom and open up
“live”  group instruction to e-learners  (Viggiano 
&
Ault, 2001).
Librarians can also work with faculty to develop a library thread in
358
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested