c# open pdf file in adobe reader : Delete pdf pages in preview SDK Library service wpf .net azure dnn TPOL_book5-part1556

learners to apply the information in a practical situation is an
active  process,  and  facilitates  personal  interpretation  and
relevance.
2. Learners should construct their own knowledge rather than
accepting that given by the instructor. Knowledge construction
is facilitated by good interactive online instruction, since the
students have to take the initiative to learn and to interact with
other  students and  the instructor,  and  because the learning
agenda  is  controlled  by  the student  (Murphy 
&
Cifuentes,
2001). In the online environment, students experience the infor-
mation at first-hand, rather than receiving filtered information
from an instructor whose style or background may differ from
theirs. In a traditional lecture, the instructor contextualizes and
personalizes the information to meet their own needs, which
may not be appropriate for all learners. In online instruction,
learners experience the information first-hand, which gives them
the opportunity to contextualize and personalize the informa-
tion themselves.
3. Collaborative and cooperative learning should be encouraged to
facilitate constructivist learning (Hooper 
&
Hannafin, 1991;
Johnson 
&
Johnson, 1996; Palloff 
&
Pratt, 1999). Working with
other learners gives learners real-life experience of working in a
group,  and  allows  them  to  use  their  metacognitive  skills.
Learners will also be able to use the strengths of other learners,
and to learn from others. When assigning learners for group
work, membership should be based on the expertise level and
learning style of individual group members, so that individual
team members can benefit from one another’s strengths.
4. Learners should be given control of the learning process. There
should be a form of guided discovery where learners are allowed
to make decision on learning goals, but with some guidance
from the instructor.
5. Learners should be given time and opportunity to reflect. When
learning online, students need the time to reflect and internalize
the information. Embedded questions on the content can be
used throughout the lesson to encourage learners to reflect on
and  process  the  information  in  a  relevant  and  meaningful
19
Foundations of Educational Theory for Online Learning
Delete pdf pages in preview - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pdf page acrobat; best pdf editor delete pages
Delete pdf pages in preview - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from pdf acrobat reader; delete page pdf acrobat reader
manner; or learners can be asked to generate a learning journal
during  the  learning  process  to  encourage  reflection  and
processing.
6. Learning should be made meaningful for learners. The learning
materials should include examples that relate to students, so that
they  can make  sense  of  the  information.  Assignments  and
projects should allow learners to choose meaningful activities to
help them apply and personalize the information.
7. Learning should be interactive to promote higher-level learning
and social presence, and to help develop personal meaning.
According to Heinich et al. (2002), learning is the development
of new knowledge, skills, and attitudes as the learner interacts
with  information  and  the  environment.  Interaction  is  also
critical to creating a sense of presence and a sense of community
for online learners, and to promoting transformational learning
(Murphy 
&
Cifuentes, 2001).  Learners receive the learning
materials through the technology, process the information, and
then personalize and contextualize the information. In the trans-
formation process, learners interact with the content, with other
learners, and with the instructors to test and confirm ideas and
to apply what they learn. Garrison (1999) claimed that it is the
design of the educational experience that includes the trans-
actional nature of the relationship between instructor, learners,
and content that is of significance to the learning experience. 
Different kinds of interaction will promote learning at different
levels. Figure 1-5 shows interactive strategies to promote higher
level learning (Berge, 1999; Gilbert 
&
Moore, 1998; Schwier 
&
Misanchuk,  1993).  Hirumi  (2002)  proposed  a  framework  of
interaction in online learning that consists of three levels. Level one
is learner-self interaction, which occurs within the learner to help
the learner monitor and regulate their own learning. Level two
interaction is learner-human and learner-non-human interactions,
where the learner interacts with human and non-human resources.
Level three is learner-instruction  interaction,  which consists of
activities to achieve a learning outcome. This paper will go one step
further and propose interactions that go from lower-level to higher-
level  interactions  based  on  behaviorist,  cognitivist,  and
constructivist schools of learning. 
20
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net.
delete pdf pages android; delete a page from a pdf file
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net.
delete pages on pdf; add remove pages from pdf
At the lowest level of interaction, there must be learner-interface
interaction to allow the learner to access and sense the information.
The  interface  is  where  learners use  the senses  to  register  the
information in sensory storage. In online learning, the interface is
with the computer to access the content and to interact with others.
Once learners access the online materials, there must be learner-
content interaction to process the information. Learners navigate
through the content to access the components of the lesson, which
could take the form of pre-learning, learning, and post-learning
activities. These activities could access reusable learning objects
from a repository (McGreal, 2002; Wiley, 2002), or they could use
content that has been custom created by the designer or instructor.
Students should be given the ability to choose their own sequence
of learning, or should be given one or more suggested sequences. As
online  learners  interact  with  the  content,  they  should  be
encouraged to apply, assess,  analyze, synthesize, evaluate, and
reflect on what they learn (Berge, 2002). It is during the learner-
21
Foundations of Educational Theory for Online Learning
Learner-interface
interaction
Learner-content
interaction
Learner-support
interaction
Learner-instructor
Learner-instructor
Learner-instructor
Learner-context
interaction
Figure 1-5. 
Levels of interaction in
online learning.
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection. • Sign PDF document with signature. • Erase PDF text. • Erase PDF images. • Erase PDF pages.
delete page on pdf; delete pdf pages ipad
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Erase PDF images. • Erase PDF pages. Miscellaneous. • Select PDF text on viewer. • Search PDF text in preview. • View PDF outlines. Related Resources.
delete pages out of a pdf file; delete page from pdf
content  interaction  that  learners  process  the  information  to
transform it from short-term to long-term memory. The higher the
level of processing, the more associations are made in long-term
memory, which results in higher-level learning. 
As learners work through the content, they will find the need for
learner support, which could take the form of learner-to-learner,
learner-to-instructor,  instructor-to-learner,  and  learner-to-expert
interactions (Moore, 1989; Rourke et al., 2001; Thiessen, 2001).
There should be strategies to promote learner-context interaction
to allow learners to apply what they learn in real life so that they
can  contextualize  the  information.  Learner-context  interaction
allows  learners  to  develop  personal  knowledge  and  construct
personal meaning from the information.
Conc
l
us
i
on
This paper concludes by proposing a model, based on educational
theory, that shows important learning components that should be
used when designing online materials. Neither placing information
on the Web nor linking to other digital resources on the Web
constitutes  online  instruction.  Online  instruction  occurs  when
learners use the Web to go through the sequence of instruction, to
complete the learning activities, and to achieve learning outcomes
and objectives (Ally, 2002; Ritchie 
&
Hoffman, 1997). A variety of
learning activities should be used to accommodate the different
learning styles. Learners will choose the appropriate strategy to
meet their learning needs. Refer to Figure 1-6 for key components
that  should  be  considered  when  designing  online  learning
materials.
L
earner Preparat
i
on
A variety of pre-learning activities can be used to prepare learners for
the details of the lesson, and to get them connected and motivated to
learn the online lesson. A rationale should be provided to inform
learners of the importance of taking the online lesson and to show
how it will benefit them. A concept map is provided to establish the
existing cognitive structure, to incorporate the details of the online
22
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pages from a pdf file; delete page in pdf reader
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
a preview component enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Delete unimportant contents:
cut pages out of pdf online; delete pages in pdf reader
lesson, and to activate learners’ existing structures to help them learn
the details in the lesson. The lesson concept map also gives learners
the “big picture.” 
Learners should be informed of the learning outcomes of the
lesson, so that they know what is expected of them and will be able
to gauge when they have achieved the lesson outcomes. An advance
organizer should be provided to establish a structure to organize
the details in the online lesson or to bridge what learners already
know and what they need to know. 
Learners must be told the prerequisite requirements so that they
can check whether they are ready for the lesson. Providing the
prerequisites  to  learners  also  activates  the  required  cognitive
structure to help them learn the materials. A self-assessment should
be provided at the start of the lesson to allow learners to check
whether they already have the knowledge and skills taught in the
online lesson. If learners think they have the knowledge and skills,
they should be allowed to take the lesson final test. The self-
assessment also helps learners to organize the lesson materials and
to recognize the important materials in the lesson. Once learners
are prepared for the  details of the lesson, they can  go on to
complete the online learning activities to learn the details of the
lesson. 
L
earner Act
i
v
i
t
i
es
Online learners should be provided with a variety of learning
activities to achieve the lesson learning outcome and to accom-
modate learners’ individual needs. Examples of learning activities
include reading textual materials, listening to audio materials, or
viewing visuals or video materials. Learners can conduct research
on the Internet and link to online information and libraries to
acquire further information. The preparation of a learning journal
will allow  learners  to reflect on  what they learn and provide
personal  meaning  to  the  information.  Appropriate application
exercises should be embedded throughout the online lesson to
establish the relevance of the materials. Practice activities, with
feedback, should be included to allow learners to monitor how they
are performing, so that they can adjust their learning method if
23
Foundations of Educational Theory for Online Learning
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Excel. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Excel file in C#.net.
delete page from pdf preview; delete pages from pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
add and delete pages from pdf; delete pages of pdf reader
necessary. A summary should be provided, or learners should be
required to generate a lesson summary, to promote higher-level
processing and to bring closure to the lesson. 
L
earner 
I
nteract
i
on
As learners complete the learning activities, they will be involved
with a variety of interactions. Learners need to interact with the
interface to access the online materials. The interface should not
overload learners, and should make it as easy as possible for
learners to sense the information for transfer to sensory store and
then into short-term memory for processing. Learners must interact
with the content to acquire the information needed to form the
knowledge base. There should be interaction between the learner
and other learners, between the learner and the instructor, and
between  the learner  and  experts  to  collaborate, participate in
shared  cognition,  form  social  networks,  and  establish  social
presence. Learners should be able to interact within their context to
personalize information and construct their own meaning.
L
earner Trans
f
er
Opportunities should be provided for learners to transfer what they
learn to real-life applications, so that they can be creative and go
beyond what was presented in the online lesson.
L
ook
i
ng Ahead
Behaviorist, cognitivist, and constructivist theories have contri-
buted in different ways to the design of online materials, and they
will continue to be used to develop learning materials for online
learning.  Behaviorist strategies can  be used to  teach the facts
(what); cognitivist strategies to teach the principles and processes
(how);  and  constructivist  strategies  to  teach  the  real-life  and
personal applications and  contextual learning. There is a shift
toward  constructive  learning,  in  which  learners are  given  the
opportunity to construct their own meaning from the information
presented during the online sessions. The use of learning objects to
24
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
delete blank pages in pdf files; delete pages of pdf online
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from PowerPoint in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
delete pages in pdf online; delete pages on pdf online
25
Foundations of Educational Theory for Online Learning
Figure 1-6. 
Components 
of effective online
learning.
Learning outcomes
Advanced organizer
Content map
Prerequisites
Content map
Prerequisites
J
ournalizing
Apply
Research
Practise
Read, listen,
and view
Summarize
Real-life
application
Personal
meaning
Learner-interface
Learner-content
Learner-context
Learner-support
Learner
preparation
Learner
activities
Learner
transfer
Learner
interaction
promote flexibility and reuse of online materials to meet the needs
of individual learners will become more common in the future.
Online  learning  materials  will  be  designed  in  small  coherent
segments, so that they can be redesigned for different learners and
different contexts. Finally,  online learning will  be  increasingly
diverse  to  respond  to  different  learning  cultures,  styles,  and
motivations. 
R
e
f
erences
Ally, M. (1980). An investigation of the relative effectiveness of
prose and pictorial advance organizers on reading from prose.
Unpublished master’s thesis, Concordia University, Montreal,
Canada.
Ally, M. (2002, August). Designing and managing successful online
distance education courses. Workshop presented at the 2002
World Computer Congress, Montreal, Canada.
Ally, M., & Fahy, P. (2002, August). Using students’ learning styles
to provide support in distance education. Proceedings of the
Eighteenth  Annual  Conference  on  Distance  Teaching  and
Learning, Madison, 
WI
.
Ausubel,  D.  P.  (1960). The use  of  advance  organizers  in  the
learning and retention of meaningful verbal material.Journal of
Educational Psychology, 51,267-272.
Ausubel, D. P. (1974). Educational psychology: A cognitive view.
New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.
Berge,  Z.  L.  (1999).  Interaction in  post-secondary  Web-based
learning. Educational Technology, 39(1), 5-11.
Berge, Z. L. (2002). Active, interactive, and reflective learning.The
Quarterly Review of Distance Education, 3(2), 181-190.
Bonk, C. J., & Reynolds, T. H. (1997). Learner-centered Web
instruction  for  higher-order  thinking,  teamwork,  and
apprenticeship. In B. H. Khan (Ed.), Web-based instruction (pp.
167-178).  Englewood  Cliffs, 
NJ
 Educational  Technology
Publications.
Carliner, S. (1999). Overview of online learning. Amherst, 
MA
:
Human Resource Development Press.
26
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
Clark, R. E. (1983). Reconsidering research  on learning from
media.Review of Educational Research, 53(4), 445-459.
Clark, R. E. (2001). A summary of disagreements with the “mere
vehicles” argument. In R. E. Clark (Ed.), Learning from media:
Arguments, analysis, and evidence (pp. 125-136). Greenwich,
CT
: Information Age Publishing Inc.
Cole,  R.  A.  (2000). Issues in Web-based pedagogy: A critical
primer.Westport, 
CT
: Greenwood Press.
Cooper, P. A. (1993). Paradigm shifts in designing instruction:
From behaviorism to cognitivism to constructivism. Educational
Technology, 33(5), 12-19.
Craik, F. I. M., & Lockhart, R. S. (1972). Levels of processing: A
framework for memory research. Journal of Verbal Learning and
Verbal Behavior, 11,671-684.
Craik, F. I. M., & Tulving, E. (1975). Depth of processing and the
retention of words in episodic memory. Journal of E
x
perimental
Psychology: General, 104, 268-294.
Duffy,  T.  M.,  &  Cunningham,  D.  J.  (1996).  Constructivism:
Implications for the design and delivery of instruction. In D. H.
Jonassen (Ed.), Handboo
k
of research for educational commun-
ications and technology (pp. 170-198). New York: Simon 
&
Schuster Macmillan.
Ertmer, P. A.,& Newby, T. J. (1993). Behaviorism, cognitivism, con-
structivism: Comparing critical features from an instructional
design perspective. Performance Improvement Quarterly, 6(4),
50-70.
Garrison, D. R. (1999). Will distance disappear in distance studies?
A reaction. Journal of Distance Education, 13(2), 10-13.
Gilbert, L., & Moore, D. L. (1998). Building interactivity into Web
courses:  Tools  for  social  and  instructional  interaction.
Educational Technology, 38(3), 29-35.
Good, T. L., & Brophy, J. E. (1990). Educational psychology: A
realistic approach (4th ed.).White Plains, 
NY
: Longman.
Heinich, R., Molenda, M., Russell, J. D., 
&
Smaldino, S. E. (2002).
Instructional media and technologies for learning.Upper Saddle
River, 
NJ
: Pearson Education.
27
Foundations of Educational Theory for Online Learning
Hirumi, A. (2002). A framework for analyzing, designing, and
sequencing  planned  e-learning  interactions. The Quarterly
Review of Distance Education, 3(2), 141-160.
Holley, C. D., Dansereau, D. F., McDonald, B. A., Garland, J. C.,
&
Collins, K. W. (1979). Evaluation of a hierarchical mapping
technique as an aid to prose processing. Contemporary Edu-
cational Psychology, 4, 227-237.
Hooper, S., 
&
Hannafin, M. J. (1991). The effects of group com-
position on achievement, interaction, and learning efficiency
during  computer-based  cooperative  instruction. Educational
Technology Research and Development, 39(3), 27-40.
Janicki, T., 
&
Liegle, J. O. (2001). Development and evaluation of
 framework  for  creating  Web-based  learning  modules:  A
pedagogical and systems approach. Journal of Asynchronous
Learning Networ
k
s, 5(1). Retrieved August 29, 2003, from
http://www.sloan-c.org/publications/jaln/v5n1/pdf/
v5n1_janicki.pdf 
Johnson, D. W., & Johnson, R. T. (1996). Cooperation and the use
of technology. In D. H. Jonassen (Ed.), Handboo
k
of research
for educational communications and technology (pp. 170-198).
New York: Simon 
&
Schuster Macmillan.
Kalat, J. W. (2002). Introduction to psychology. Pacific Grove, 
CA
:
Wadsworth-Thompson Learning.
Keller, J. M. (1983). Motivational design of instruction. In C. M.
Reigeluth (Ed.), Instructional design theories and instruction:
An overview of their current status(pp. 383-429). Hillsdale, 
NJ
:
Lawrence Erlbaum. 
Keller, J. M., & Suzuki, K. (1988). Use of the 
ARCS
motivation
model in courseware design. In D. H. Jonassen (Ed.), Instruc-
tional  design  for microcomputer  courseware (pp. 401-434).
Hillsdale, 
NJ
: Lawrence Erlbaum. 
Khan, B. (1997). Web-based instruction: What is it and why is it?
In  B.  H.  Khan  (Ed.), Web-based instruction (pp.  5-18).
Englewood Cliffs, 
NJ
: Educational Technology Publications. 
Kolb, D. A. (1984). E
x
periential learning: E
x
perience as the source
of learning and development. Englewood Cliffs, 
NJ
: Prentice-
Hall.
28
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested