c# open pdf file in browser : Delete blank pages in pdf Library application class asp.net azure wpf ajax TPOL_book8-part1559

Learners can of course interact directly with content that they find
in multiple formats, and especially on the Web; however, many
choose to have their learning sequenced, directed, and evaluated
with the assistance of a teacher. This interaction can take place
within a community of inquiry, using a variety of Net-based syn-
chronous  and  asynchronous activities  (video,  audio,  computer
conferencing, chats, or virtual world interaction). These environ-
ments are particularly rich, and allow for the learning of social
skills, the collaborative learning of content, and the development of
personal  relationships  among  participants.  However,  the
49
Toward a Theory of Online Learning
Figure 2-4. 
A model of online
learning showing types
of interaction.
Delete blank pages in pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages pdf online; delete page in pdf document
Delete blank pages in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from a pdf; delete pages from a pdf online
community binds learners in time, forcing regular sessions or at
least group-paced learning. Community models are also, generally,
more expensive, as they suffer from an inability to scale to large
numbers of learners. The second model of learning (on the right)
illustrates the structured learning tools associated with independent
learning.  Common tools  used  in  this  mode include computer-
assisted tutorials, drills, and simulations. Virtual labs, in which
students  complete simulations of lab experiments, and sophis-
ticated  search  and retrieval  tools  are  also  becoming  common
instruments  for  individual  learning.  Printed  texts  (now  often
distributed and read online) have long been used to convey teacher
interpretations and insights  in  independent  study.  However,  it
should also be emphasized that, although engaged in independent
study, the student is not alone. Often colleagues in the work place,
peers located locally (or distributed, perhaps across the Net), and
family members have  been shown to be significant sources of
support  and  assistance  to  independent  study  learners  (Potter,
1998).
Using  the  online  model,  then,  requires  that  teachers  and
designers make crucial decisions at various points. A key decision
factor is based on the nature of the learning that is prescribed.
Marc Prensky (2000) argues that different learning outcomes are
best learned through particular types of learning activities. Prensky
asks not, “How do students learn?” but more specifically, “How
do they learn what?”
Prensky (2000, p. 156) postulates that, in general, we all learn:
• behaviors through imitation, feedback, and practice;
• creativity through playing;
• facts through association, drill, memory, and questions;
• judgment through reviewing cases, asking questions, making
choices, and receiving feedback and coaching;
• language through imitation, practice, and immersion;
• observation through viewing examples and receiving feedback;
• procedures through imitation and practice;
• processes through system analysis, deconstruction, and practice;
50
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in
delete pages on pdf file; delete pages pdf file
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online
delete blank pages in pdf; delete page from pdf file online
• systems  through  discovering  principles  and  undertaking
graduated tasks;
• reasoning through puzzles, problems, and examples;
• skills  (physical  or  mental)  through  imitation,  feedback,
continuous practice, and increasing challenge;
• speeches or performance roles through memorization, practice,
and coaching;
• theories through logic, explanation, and questioning. 
Prensky also argues that there are forms and styles of games that
can be used, online or offline, to facilitate the learning of each of
these skills. 
I would argue that each of these activities can be accomplished
through e-learning, using some combination of online community
activities and computer-supported independent-study activities. By
tracing the interactions expected and provided for learners through
the model, one can plan for and ensure that an appropriate mix of
student,  teacher,  and  content interaction is  designed  for  each
learning outcome.
On
li
ne 
L
earn
i
ng and the Semant
i
c Web
We are entering an era in which the Web is changing from a
medium to display content, to one in which content is endowed
with semantic meaning (Berners-Lee, 1999). If the format and
structure  of  content  is  described  in  formalized  and  machine-
readable languages, then it can be searched and acted upon, not
only by humans but also by computer programs commonly known
as autonomous agents. This new capacity has been most prom-
inently championed by  the original designer  of the Web,  Tim
Berners-Lee, and is named by him the “Semantic Web.”
The Semantic Web will be populated by a variety of autonomous
agents—small computer programs designed to navigate the Web,
searching  for  particular  information  and  then  acting  on  that
information in support of their assigned task. In education, student
agents will be used for intelligent searching of relevant content, and
as secretaries for booking and arranging for collaborative meetings,
for reminding students of deadlines, and for negotiating with the
51
Toward a Theory of Online Learning
C# Word - Insert Blank Word Page in C#.NET
Users to Insert (Empty) Word Page or Pages from a to specify where they want to insert (blank) Word document rotate Word document page, how to delete Word page
delete blank pages in pdf files; delete a page from a pdf file
C# PowerPoint - Insert Blank PowerPoint Page in C#.NET
to Insert (Empty) PowerPoint Page or Pages from a where they want to insert (blank) PowerPoint document PowerPoint document page, how to delete PowerPoint page
delete page from pdf online; delete pdf pages android
agents  of  other  students  for  assistance,  collaboration,  or
socialization. Teacher agents will be used to  provide  remedial
tuition, and to assist with record keeping, with monitoring student
progress,  and  even  with  marking  and  responding  to  student
communications. Content itself can be augmented with agents that
control rights to its use, automatically update it, and track the
means by which the content is used by students (Thaiupathump,
Bourne, 
&
Campbell, 1999; Shaw, Johnson, 
&
Ganeshan, 1999).
The Semantic Web also supports the reuse and adaptation of
content by supporting the construction, distribution, and dissem-
ination  of  digitized  content  that  is  formatted  and  formally
described (Wiley, 2000; Downes, 2000). The recent emergence of
educational modeling languages (Koper, 2001) allows educators to
describe, in a language accessible on the Web, not only the content
but also the activities and context or environment of learning
experiences. Together these capabilities afforded by the Semantic
Web allow us to envision an e-learning environment that is rich
with student-student, student-content, and student-teacher inter-
actions  that  are affordable,  reusable,  and  facilitated by active
agents (see Figure 2-5, below).
Toward a Theory o
f
On
li
ne 
L
earn
i
ng
The Web offers a host of very powerful affordances to educators.
Existing and older education provisions have been defined by the
techniques and tools designed to overcome the limitations and
exploit the capacities of earlier media. For example, the earliest
universities were constructed around medieval libraries that af-
forded access to rare hand-written books and manuscripts. Early
forms of distance education were constructed using text and the
delayed forms of asynchronous communications afforded by mail
services. Campus-based education systems are constructed around
physical  buildings  that  afford  meeting  and  lecture  spaces  for
teachers and groups of students. The Web provides nearly ubiqui-
tous access to quantities of content that are many orders of magni-
tude larger than those provided in any other medium.
From our earlier discussion, we see that the Web affords a vast
potential for education delivery that generally subsumes almost all
the modes and means of education delivery previously used, with
52
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
String outputFile = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; // Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages PDFDocument doc = PDFDocument.Create(2
delete pages from a pdf in preview; delete blank page from pdf
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page is the programmatic representation of a PDF document instance may consist of newly created blank pages or image
delete page from pdf reader; delete page from pdf document
perhaps the exception of the rich face-to-face interaction of the
classroom. We have also seen that the most critical component of
formal  education  consists  of  interaction  between  and  among
multiple actors, humans and agents included.
Thus, I conclude this chapter with an overview of a theory of
online learning interaction that suggests that the various forms of
student interaction can be substituted for each other, depending on
costs, content, learning objectives, convenience, technology, and
available time. The substitutions do not result in decreases in the
quality of the learning that results. More formally:
53
Toward a Theory of Online Learning
Figure 2-5. 
Educational
interactions on the
Semantic Web.
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Dim outputFile As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" ' Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages Dim doc As PDFDocument = PDFDocument
delete page on pdf reader; delete page on pdf document
How to C#: Cleanup Images
returned. Delete Blank Pages. Set property BlankPageDelete to true , blank pages in the document will be deleted. Remove Edges or Borders.
reader extract pages from pdf; cut pages from pdf online
Sufficient levels of deep and meaningful learning can be
developed, as long as one of the three forms of interaction
(student-teacher; student-student; student-content) is at 
very high levels. The other two may be offered at minimal 
levels or even eliminated without degrading the educational
experience. (Anderson, 2002)
The challenge for teachers and course developers working in an
online learning context is to construct a learning environment that
is simultaneously learning centered, content centered, community
centered, and assessment centered. There is no single, right medium
of online learning, nor a formulaic specification that dictates the
kind of interaction most conducive to learning in all domains with
all learners. Rather, teachers must learn to develop their skills so
that  they  can  respond  to  student  and  curriculum  needs  by
developing a set of online learning activities that are adaptable to
diverse student needs. Table 2-1 illustrates how the affordances of
these emerging technologies can be directed so as to create the
environment that is most supportive of “how people learn.”
54
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
Table 2-1. 
Affordances of the
network environment 
and the attributes of
“How people learn.” 
“How people 
learn” framework 
(Bransford et al.)
Affordances 
of the current 
Web 
Affordances 
of the Semantic 
Web
Learner 
centered
Knowledge 
centered
Community 
centered
Capacity to support 
individualized and 
community centered 
learning activities
Direct access to vast 
libraries of content 
and learning activities 
organized from a variety 
of discipline perspectives
Asynchronous and 
synchronous; 
collaborative and 
individual interactions 
in many formats
Agents for translating, 
reformatting, time shifting,
monitoring, and sum-
marizing community 
interactions
Assessment 
centered
Multiple time- and place-
shifted opportunities for 
formative and summative 
assessment by self, peers, 
and teachers
Agents for assessing, 
critiquing, and 
providing “just in 
time feedback”
Content that changes 
in response to 
individualized and 
group learner models
Agents for selecting, 
personalizing, and 
reusing content
VB.NET PDF: Get Started with PDF Library
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" ' Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages Dim doc
cut pages from pdf file; pdf delete page
Conc
l
us
i
on
This discussion highlights the wide and diverse forms of teaching
and learning that can be supported on the Web today, and the
realization that the educational Semantic Web will further enhance
the possibilities and affordances of the Web, making it premature
to define a particular theory of online learning. However, we can
expect that online learning, like all forms of quality learning, will
be  knowledge,  community,  assessment,  and  learner  centered.
Online learning will enhance the critical function of interaction in
education in multiple formats and styles among all the participants.
These  interactions  will  be  supported  by  autonomous  agents
working on behalf of all participants. The task of the online course
designer and teacher is to choose, adapt, and perfect (through
feedback, assessment, and reflection) educational activities that
maximize the affordances of the Web. In doing so, they create
learning-,  knowledge-,  assessment-,  and  community-centered
educational experiences that result in high levels of learning by all
participants. Integration of the new tools and affordances of the
Semantic  Web  further  enhances  the  quality,  accessibility,  and
affordability of online learning experiences.
Our challenge as theory builders and online practitioners is to
delineate which modes, methods, activities, and actors are most
effective, in terms of cost and learning, in creating and distributing
quality e-learning programs. The creation of a model is often the
first step toward the development of a theory. The model presented
illustrates most of the key variables that interact to create online
educational experiences and contexts. The next step is to theorize
and measure the direction and magnitude of the effect of each of
these variables on relevant outcome variables, including learning,
cost, completion, and satisfaction. The models presented in this
chapter and other chapters in this book do not yet constitute a
theory of online learning, but it is hoped that they will help us to
deepen our understanding of this complex educational context and
lead  us  to  hypotheses,  predictions,  and  most  importantly
improvements in our professional practice. It is hoped that the
model and discussion in this and other chapters in this book lead
us toward a theory of online learning.
55
Toward a Theory of Online Learning
R
e
f
erences
Anderson, T.  (2002). Getting  the mix right: An updated and
theoretical  rationale  for interaction. 
ITFORUM
 Paper #63.
Retrieved  June  6,  2003,  from  http://it.coe.uga.edu/itforum/
paper63/paper63.htm
Anderson, T. (2003). Modes of interaction in distance education:
Recent developments and research questions. In M. Moore 
&
G. Anderson (Eds.), Handboo
k
of distance education (pp. 129-
144). Mahwah, 
NJ
: Erlbaum.
Anderson,  T.  (in  press).  A  second  look  at  learning  sciences,
classrooms and technology. In T. Duffy 
&
J. Kirkley (Eds.)
Learner centered theory and practice in distance education.
Mahwah, 
NJ
: Erlbaum.
Anderson, T., 
&
Garrison, D. R. (1998). Learning in a networked
world:  New  roles  and  responsibilities.  In  C.  Gibson (Ed.),
Distance learners in higher education(pp. 97-112). Madison,
WI
: Atwood Publishing.
Anderson, T., 
&
Kanuka, H. (2002). E-research: Issues, strategies
and methods.Boston: Allyn and Bacon.
Annand, D. (1999). The problem of computer conferencing for
distance-based universities.Open Learning, 14(3), 47-52.
Bates, A. (1991). Interactivity as a criterion for media selection in
distance education. Never Too Far, 16,5-9. 
Baxter, G. P., Elder, A. D., 
&
Glaser, R. (1996). Knowledge-based
cognition and performance assessment in the science classroom.
Educational Psychologist, 31(2), 133-140.
Benedikt, M. (1992). Cyberspace: Some proposals. In M. Benedikt
(Ed.), Cyberspace: First steps (pp. 119-224). Cambridge, 
MA
:
MIT
Press.
Berners-Lee, T. (1999). Weaving the Web: The original design and
ultimate destiny of the World Wide Web by its inventor. San
Francisco: Harper.
Bransford, J., Brown, A., 
&
Cocking, R. (1999). How people learn:
Brain, mind e
x
perience and school. Retrieved June 6, 2003,
from  the  National  Academy  of  Sciences  Web  site:  http://
www.nap.edu/html/howpeople1
56
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
Damon,  W.  (1984).  Peer  interaction:  The  untapped  potential.
Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 5,331-343.
Dewey,  J.  (1916). Democracy and education. New  York:
Macmillan.  Retrieved  June  6,  2003,  from  the  Institute  for
Learning Technologies Web site: http://www.ilt.columbia.edu/
publications/dewey.html
Downes, S. (2000). Learning objects. Retrieved June 6, 2003, from
http://www.atl.ualberta.ca/downes/naweb/column000523.htm
Eastin, M., 
&
LaRose, R. (2000). Internet self-efficacy and the
psychology of the digital divide. Journal of Computer Mediated
Communications, 6(1).
Eklund, J. (1995). Cognitive models for structuring hypermedia
and  implications  for  learning  from  the  World  Wide  Web.
Proceedings of Aus
WEB
95. Retrieved June 6, 2003, from 
http://ausweb.scu.edu.au/aw95/hypertext/eklund
Feenberg, A. (1989). The written world: On the theory and practice
of computer conferencing. In  R. Mason 
&
A. Kaye  (Eds.),
Mindweave: Communication, computers, and distance education
(pp. 22-39). Toronto: Pergamon Press.
Garrison,  D.  R., 
&
Shale,  D. (1990). A  new framework and
perspective. In D. R. Garrison 
&
D. Shale (Eds.), Education at a
distance: From issues to practice (pp. 123-133). Malabar, 
FL
:
Robert E. Krieger.
Google, Inc. (1998-2003). Google search engine. Retrieved July 19,
2003, from http://www.google.ca
Harasim, L. (1989). On-line education: A new domain. In R. Mason
&
A. Kaye (Eds.), Mindweave: Communication, computers, and
distance education(pp. 50-62). Toronto: Pergamon Press.
Harasim, L., Hiltz, S., Teles, L., 
&
Turoff, M. (1995). Learning
networ
k
s: A field guide to teaching and learning online.London:
MIT
Press.
Hine, C. (2000). Virtual ethnography.London: Sage.
Holmberg, B. (1989). Theory and practice of distance education.
London: Routledge.
Jaffee,  D.  (1998).  Institutionalized  resistance  to  asynchronous
learning networks. Journal of Asynchronous Learning Net-
wor
k
s, 2(2) Retrieved June 6, 2003, from http://www.aln.org/
publications/jaln/v2n2/pdf/v2n2_jaffee.pdf
57
Toward a Theory of Online Learning
Jonassen, D. (1991). Evaluating constructivistic learning. Educa-
tional Technology, 31(10), 28-33.
Jonassen, D. (1992). Designing hypertext for learning. In E. Scanlon
&
T. O’Shea (Eds.), New directions in educational technology
(pp. 123-130). Berlin: Springer-Verlag.
Koper, R. (2001). Modelling units of study from a pedgagogical
perspective:  The  pedagogical  meta-model  behind 
EML
.
Retrieved  June  6,  2003  from  the  Open  University  of  the
Netherlands  Web  site:  http://eml.ou.nl/introduction/docs/ped-
metamodel.pdf
Kovacs Consulting. (2002). Directory of scholarly and professional
e-conferences. Retrieved July 17, 2003, from http://www.
kovacs.com/directory
Langer, E. (1989). Mindfulness. Reading, 
MA
: Addison-Wesley.
Laurillard, D. (1997). Rethin
k
ing university teaching: A framewor
k
for  the  effective  use  of  educational  technology. London:
Routledge.
Lipman, M. (1991). Thin
k
ing in education.Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press.
Mason, J., 
&
Hart, G.  (1997). Effective use of asynchronous
virtual  learning  communities. Retrieved June 6, 2003 from
http://www.arch.usyd.edu.au/kcdc/conferences/
VC
97/papers/ma
son.html
McPeck, J. (1990). Teaching critical thin
k
ing.New York: Routledge.
MERLOT
(Multimedia Educational Resource for Learning and
Online Teaching). (1997-2003). Home page.Retrieved July 17,
2003, from http://www.merlot.org/Home.po
Moore, M. (1989). Three types of interaction. American Journal of
Distance Education, 3(2), 1-6.
Norman,  D.  (1999).  Affordance,  conventions  and  design.
Interactions, 6(3), 38-43. Retrieved June 6, 2003, from http://
www.jnd.org/dn.mss/affordances-interactions.html
Notess, G. (2002). The Blog realm: News sources, searching with
Daypop, and content management. Online, 26(5). Retrieved June
6, 2003, from http://www.onlinemag.net/sep02/OnTheNet.htm
58
Theory and Practice of Online Learning
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested