c# open pdf file in browser : Delete pages in pdf online SDK application service wpf azure winforms dnn smith_modern_optical_engineering57-part160

For plano surfaces:
No. per tool =
 
2
(15.1)
rounded downward to the nearest integer, where D
t
is the diameter of
the blocking  tool  and  d is  the  effective  diameter  of  the  piece  (and
should include an allowance for clearance between the elements).
For spherical surfaces:
No. per tool =
 
(15.2a)
where Ris the surface radius, d is the lens diameter (including a clear-
ance allowance), and SH is the sagittal height of the tool. For a tool
which subtends 180°, SH = R and this reduces to
No. per tool =
 =
(15.2b)
rounded downward to the nearest integer, where B is the half-angle
subtended by the lens diameter (plus spacing allowance) from the cen-
ter of curvature of the surface, as indicated in Fig. 15.2.
Where there are only a few lenses per tool, the following tabulation
for 180° tools is convenient and more accurate.
No. per tool
Maximum d/D
t
Maximum sin B
2B
2
0.500
0.707
90°
3
0.462
0.655
81.79°
4
0.412
0.577
70.53°
5
0.372
0.507
60.89°
6
0.500
60°
7
0.332
0.447
53.13°
8
0.301
0.398
46.91°
9
0.276
0.383
45°
10
0.369
43.24°
11
0.253
0.358
41.88°
12
0.243
0.346
40.24°
Grinding.
The surface of the element is further refined by a series of
grinding operations, performed with loose abrasive in a water slurry
and cast iron grinding tools. If the elements have not been generated,
the  grinding  process  begins  with  a  coarse,  fast-cutting  emery.
Otherwise, it begins with a medium grade and proceeds to a very fine
grade which imparts a smooth velvety surface to the glass.
The grinding (and polishing) of a spherical surface is accomplished
to a high degree of precision with relatively crude equipment by tak-
ing advantage of a unique property of a spherical surface, namely, that
1
2
1.5
(sin B)
2
1
2
6R
2
d
2
1
2
SH
R
6R
2
d
2
1
2
D
t
d
3
4
552
Chapter Fifteen
Delete pages in pdf online - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
cut pages from pdf; delete a page in a pdf file
Delete pages in pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from a pdf online; add remove pages from pdf
a concave sphere and a convex sphere of the same radius will contact
each other intimately regardless of their relative orientations. Thus, if
two mating surfaces which are approximately spherical are contacted
(with abrasive between them)  and randomly moved with  respect to
each other, the general tendency is for both surfaces to wear away at
their high spots and to approach a true spherical surface as they wear.
(For a detailed analytical treatment of the subject of relative wear in
optical processing, the reader is strongly urged to consult the reference
by Deve, listed at the end of this chapter.)
Usually the convex piece (either blocker or grinding tool) is mount-
ed in a power-driven spindle and the concave piece is placed on top as
shown in Fig. 15.3. The upper tool is constrained only by a ball pin-
and-socket arrangement and is free to rotate as driven by its sliding
contact with the lower piece; it tends to assume the same angular rate
of rotation as the lower piece. The pin is oscillated back and forth so
that the relationship between the two tools is continuously varied. By
adjusting the offset and amplitude of the motion of the pin, the opti-
cian  can  modify  the  pattern  of  wear  on  the  glass  and  thus  effect
minute corrections to the value and uniformity of the radius generat-
ed by the process.
Optics in Practice
553
Figure 15.3
In grinding (or polishing), a semirandom scrubbing action
is set up by the rotation of the lower (convex) tool about its axis and
the back-and-forth oscillation of the upper (concave) tool. Note that
the upper tool is free to rotate about the ball end of the driving pin
and takes on a rotation induced by the lower tool.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
cut pages out of pdf file; delete a page from a pdf in preview
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
acrobat export pages from pdf; add and delete pages from pdf
Each successively finer grade of emery is used until the grinding pits
left by the preceding operation are ground out.
Polishing.
The mechanics of the polishing process are quite analogous
to the grinding process. However, the polishing tool is lined with a lay-
er of pitch and the polishing compound is a slurry of water and rouge
(iron oxide) or cerium oxide. The polishing pitch will cold flow and thus
take on the shape of the work in a very short time.
The  polishing  process  is  a peculiar  one  that  is  still incompletely
understood. It appears that the surface of the glass is hydrolyzed by
the polishing slurry and the resulting gel layer is scraped away by the
particles of polishing compound embedded in the polishing pitch. This
analysis explains many of the phenomena associated with polishing,
such as scratches and cracks which are “flowed” shut by polishing, but
which later open up when heated or exposed to the atmosphere. But
when one considers that historically, polishing tools have been made
from materials as diverse as felt, lead, taffeta, leather, wood, copper,
and cork, and that polishing compounds other than rouge have been
successfully used, and that many optical materials (e.g., silicon, ger-
manium, aluminum, nickel, and crystals) have a different chemistry
than glass, it would seem that a variety of polishing mechanisms is
quite likely. Some polishing agents are actually etchants of the mater-
ial that they polish; some materials can be polished dry.
Polishing is continued until the surface is free of any grinding pits
or scratches. The accuracy of the radius is checked by the use of a test
plate (or test glass). This is a very precisely made master gage which
has been polished to an exact radius and which is a true sphere to
within a tiny fraction of a wavelength. The test plate is placed in con-
tact with the work, and the difference in shape is determined by the
appearance  of  the  interference  fringes  (Newton’s  rings)  formed
between the two. The relative curvatures of the two surfaces can be
determined by noting whether the gage contacts the work at the edge
or the center. If the number of rings is counted, the difference between
the two radii can be closely approximated from the formula
∆R ≈ N
 
2
(15.3)
where ∆R is the radius difference, N is the number of fringes,  is the
wavelength of the illumination, R is the radius of the test plate, and d
is the diameter over which the measurement is made. One fringe indi-
cates a change of one-half wavelength in the spacing between the two
surfaces. A noncircular fringe pattern is an indication of an aspheric
surface. An elliptical fringe indicates a toroidal surface.
2R
d
554
Chapter Fifteen
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET
add and remove pages from a pdf; delete page in pdf
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pdf pages android; delete page on pdf document
Small corrections are made either by adjustment of the stroke of the
polishing machine or by scraping away portions of the polishing tool 
so that the wear is concentrated on the portion of the work which is 
too high.
Centering.
After both surfaces of an element are polished, the lens is
centered.  This  is  done  by  grinding  the rim  of  the lens so  that  the
mechanical axis (defined by the ground edge of the lens) coincides with
the optical axis, which is the line between the centers of curvature of
the two surfaces. In visual centering the element is fastened (with wax
or pitch) to an  accurately  trued tubular tool  on  a rotating  spindle.
When the lens is pressed on the tool, the surface against the tool is
automatically aligned with the tool and hence with the axis of rotation.
While the pitch is still soft, the operator slides the lens laterally until
the outer surface  also  runs  true.  If  the  lens  is rotated  slowly,  any
decentration  of  either  surface  is  detectable  as  a  movement  of  the
reflected image (of a nearby target) formed by that surface, as indicat-
ed in Fig. 15.4. For high-precision work, the images may be viewed
with a telescope or microscope to increase the operator’s sensitivity to
the image  motion.  The  periphery of the  lens is  then  ground  to  the
desired diameter with a diamond-charged wheel. Bevels or protective
chamfers are usually ground at this time.
For economical production of moderately precise optics, a mechani-
cal centering process is used. In this method, called “cup” or “bell” cen-
tering,  the  lens  element  is  gripped  between  two  accurately  trued
tubular tools. The pressure of the tools causes the lens to slip sideways
until the distance between the tools is at a minimum, thus centering
the lens. The lens is then rotated against a diamond wheel to grind the
diameter to size.
Optics in Practice
555
Figure 15.4
Left: In visual  centering the lens is shifted laterally until no
motion of the image of a target reflected from the lens surface can be detected
as the lens is rotated. Right: In mechanical centering the lens is pressed
between hollow cylinders. It slides laterally until its axis coincides with the
common axis of the two tools.
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
delete blank page from pdf; delete page from pdf document
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
add and delete pages in pdf online; delete page in pdf file
The manufacture of the lens is completed by low-reflection coating
the surfaces as required and by cementing, if the element is part of a
compound component; these processes are outlined in Chap. 7.
Modifications of the standard processing techniques are sometimes
required for unusual materials. Brittle materials (e.g., calcium fluo-
ride) must be treated gently, especially in grinding. Afiner, softer abra-
sive  is required;  sometimes  soap  is added  to  the  abrasive  and  soft
brass  grinding  tools  are  used  in  place  of  cast  iron.  At  the  other
extreme, sapphire (Al
2
O
3
) cannot be processed with ordinary materials
because of its extreme hardness, and diamond powder is used for both
grinding and polishing.
Materials which are subject to attack by the grinding or polishing
slurry are sometimes processed using a saturated solution of the opti-
cal  material  in  the  liquid  of  the  slurry.  For  example,  if  a  glass  is
attacked by water, one could make up the slurry with water in which
 powder  of  the  glass  has  been  boiled  or  soaked  for  several  days.
Alternately a slurry of kerosene or oil sometimes works well. Other liq-
uids which have been used in slurries include ethylene glycol, glycerol,
and triacetate.
High-speed processing.
For optics where the surface accuracy require-
ments are not high, the processes described above can be materially
accelerated.  Ordinary  grinding  usually  takes  tens  of  minutes.
Polishing may take from 1 or 2 hours up to 8 or 10 hours in difficult
cases.  These  operations  can  be  speeded  up  by  increasing  both  the
speed of the spindle rotation and the pressure between work and tool.
Tool wear and deformation are then a problem, so tools which are very
resistant  to  change are  used.  Grinding  is  accomplished  using tools
faced  with pellets or pads of  diamond particles sintered in  a  metal
matrix; loose abrasive is not used. This is called pellet grinding or pel-
grinding. Polishing  is done  with  a  metal  (typically  aluminum)  tool
faced with a thin (0.01 to 0.02 in) layer of plastic (e.g., polyurethane).
Processing times are to the order of minutes; a surface may be gener-
ated, ground, and polished in 5 or 10 minutes. Since the tools are not
compliant, it is necessary that the radius from the generator have an
exact relationship to the radius of the diamond pellet grinding tool,
and that the ground radius match (to within a few fringes, à la Eq.
15.3)  the  radius  required  by  the  hard  plastic  polishing  tool.  This
process is widely used for sunglasses, filters, inexpensive camera lens-
es, and the like. The surface geometry tends to be marginal as regards
accuracy of figure, and the fixed-abrasive grinding does cause some
subsurface fracturing, but the process is fast and economical. The tool-
ing  required  and  the  fine-tuning  adjustments  of  the  steps  of  the
process limit its application to large-quantity production.
556
Chapter Fifteen
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. Explanation about transparency. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online. This
delete page on pdf file; delete pages pdf online
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pdf pages reader; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
Nonspherical surfaces.
Aspherics, cylinders, and toroids do not share
the universality of the spherical surface, and their manufacture is dif-
ficult. While a sphere is readily generated by a random grinding and
polishing  (because  any  line  through  the  center  is  an  axis),  optical
aspherics have only one axis of symmetry. Thus the simple principle of
random scrubbing which generates a sphere must be replaced by oth-
er means. An  ordinary spherical  optical surface is a true  sphere to
within a few millionths of an inch. For aspherics this precision can
only  be  obtained  by  a  combination  of  exacting  measurement  and
skilled “hand correction” or its equivalent.
Cylindrical surfaces of moderate radius can be generated by work-
ing the piece between centers (i.e., on a lathe). However, any irregu-
larity in the process tends to produce grooves or rings in the surface.
This can be counteracted by increasing the rate of working along the
axis relative to the rate of rotation about the axis. It is difficult to avoid
a small amount of taper (i.e., a conical surface) in working cylinders.
Large-radius cylinders are difficult to swing between centers and are
usually handled with an x-y rocking mechanism which constrains the
axes of work and tool to parallelism so as to avoid a saddle surface.
Aspherics of rotation, such as paraboloids, ellipsoids, and the like,
can be made in modest production quantities if the precision required
of the surface is of a relatively low order, as, for example, in an eye-
piece. The usual technique is to use a cam-guided grinding rig (with a
diamond wheel) to generate the surface as precisely as possible. The
problem is then to fine-grind and polish the surface without destroy-
ing its basic shape. The difficulty is that any random motion which
works  the  surface  uniformly  tends  to  change  the  surface  contour
toward a spherical form. Extremely flexible tools which can follow the
surface contour are required; however, their very flexibility tends to
defeat  their purpose, which is to smooth or  average out small local
irregularities left in the surface by the generating process. Pneumatic
(i.e., air-filled, elastic) or spongy tools have proved quite successful for
this purpose.
Where precise aspherics are required, “hand” or “differential” cor-
rection is practically a necessity. The surface is ground and polished as
accurately as possible and is then measured. The measurement tech-
nique must be precise enough to detect and quantify the errors. For
high-quality work, this means that the measurements must be able to
indicate surface distortions of a fraction of a wavelength. The Foucault
knife edge test and the Ronchi grating tests are widely used for this
purpose; these tests can usually be applied directly to the aspheric sur-
face, although there are many aspheric applications (e.g., the Schmidt
corrector plate) where the test must be applied to the complete system
to determine the errors in the aspheric.
Optics in Practice
557
When the surface is close to the required figure, it can be tested with
an interferometer, just as a spherical surface on a lens is tested with a
test plate (which is of course a simple interferometer). However, for a
nonspherical surface some sort of arrangement is necessary to reshape
the wave front reflected from the aspheric so that it matches the ref-
erence wave front of the interferometer. For a conic surface, auxiliary
mirrors can be arranged so that the conic is imaging from focal point
to focal point, and a perfect conic will then produce a perfectly spheri-
cal wave front. A more generally applicable approach is the use of a
null lens, which is designed and very carefully constructed to distort
the reflected wave front into an exactly spherical shape. For a parab-
oloid tested at its center of curvature, the null lens can be as simple as
one or two plano-convex lenses whose undercorrected spherical cancels
the overcorrection of the paraboloid. For general aspherics, the null
lens may need to be quite complex.
When the surface errors have been measured and located, the sur-
face is corrected by polishing away the areas which are too high. This
can be accomplished (with a full-size polisher and a very short stroke)
by scraping away those areas of the polisher which correspond to the
low areas of the surface. In making a paraboloid of low aperture, such
as used in a small astronomical telescope, the surface is close enough
to a sphere that the correction can often be effected simply by modify-
ing the stroke of the polisher. However, for large work and for difficult
aspherics, it is usually better to use small or ring (annular) tools and
to wear down the high zones by a direct attack. A certain amount of
delicacy and finesse is required for this approach; if the process is con-
tinued  for  a  minute  or  so  longer  than  required,  the  result  is  a
depressed ring which then requires that the entire balance of the sur-
face be worn down to match this new low point.
Afew companies have developed equipment which more or less auto-
mates this process. In one technique, a computer-controlled polisher
uses a small polishing tool (or a tool consisting of three small tools
which  are driven to spin about their centroid)  which  is directed to
dwell on the regions of the work which are high and need to be pol-
ished down. The location and dwell time are determined from inter-
ferograms of the surface, plus a knowledge of the wear pattern which
the polishing tool produces. The use of a small, driven polisher means
that the device is not limited to polishing annular zones on the work,
and thus unsymmetrical surface errors can be efficiently corrected.
Another computer-controlled process is called magnetorheologic pol-
ishing. Here the polishing slurry includes a magnetic iron compound.
The slurry is moved past the rotating lens, and at the lens a magnetic
field causes the slurry to become stiff. This produces a localized pol-
ishing (or wearing) action on the surface. By rocking, spinning, and
558
Chapter Fifteen
advancing the lens into the moving slurry under computer control, the
surface can be locally polished to achieve the desired surface figure.
Again, an unsymmetrical figure error can be corrected by synchroniz-
ing the localized polishing action with the position of the lens.
Single-point  diamond  turning.
Extremely  accurate,  numerically  con-
trolled lathes and milling machines are now available which are capa-
ble of generating both the finish and the precise geometry required for
an optical surface. The cutting tool used is a single-crystal diamond,
and the optic is machined as in a lathe or as with a fly-cutter in a mill.
Asingle-point machining  operation leaves  tool marks—the  finished
surface is scalloped, and in some respects resembles a diffraction grat-
ing. This is one  limitation of the  process, and finished surfaces  are
often  lightly  “postpolished”  to  smooth  out  the  turning  marks.  The 
more severe limitation is that  only a few materials are suitable for
machining,  and  unfortunately,  optical  glass  is  not  one  of  them.
However, several useful materials are turnable, including copper, nick-
el, aluminum, silicon, germanium, zinc selenide and sulfide, and, of
course, plastics. Thus mirrors and  infrared optics can  be fabricated
this way. Infrared optics do not require the same level of precision as
do visual-wavelength optics, simply because a quarter-wave is almost
20 times larger at 10 μm than in the visible wavelengths. With this
process an aspheric surface is just about as easy to make as a spheri-
cal surface. It has found significant acceptance in the infrared and mil-
itary applications.
15.2 Optical Specifications and Tolerances
Many otherwise fully competent optical workers come to grief when it
is necessary for them to send their designs to the shop for fabrication.
The two most common difficulties are underspecification, in the sense
of  incompletely  describing  what  is  required,  and  overspecification,
wherein tolerances are established which are much more severe than
necessary.
Optical  manufacture  is  an  unusual  process.  If  enough  time  and
money are available, almost any degree of precision (that can be mea-
sured) can be attained. Thus, specifications must be determined on a
dual basis: (1) the limits which are determined by the performance
requirements of the system, and (2) the expenditure of time and mon-
ey which is justified by the application. Note well that optical toler-
ances which represent an equal amount of difficulty to maintain may
vary widely in magnitude. For example, it is not difficult to control the
sphericity of a surface to one-tenth of a micrometer; the comparable (in
terms of difficulty) tolerance for thickness is about 100 μm (0.1 mm),
Optics in Practice
559
three orders of magnitude larger. For this reason it is rare to find “box”
tolerances in optical work; each dimension, or at least each class of
dimension, is individually toleranced.
Every essential characteristic of an optical part should be spelled out
in a clear and unambiguous way. Optical shops are accustomed to this,
and if a specification is  incomplete, either time  must be  wasted  in
questioning the specification to determine what the requirements are,
or the shop must arbitrarily establish a tolerance. Either procedure is
undesirable.
The following paragraphs are an attempt to provide a general guide
to the specification of optics. The discussion will include the basis for
the establishment of tolerances, the conventional methods of specify-
ing desired characteristics, and an indication of what tolerances a typ-
ical shop may be expected to deliver.
The intelligent choice of specifications and tolerances for optical fab-
rications is an extremely profitable endeavor. The guiding philosophy
in establishing tolerances should be to allow as large a tolerance as the
requirement  for  satisfactory  performance of the  optical  system  will
permit. Designs should be established with the aim of minimizing the
effect produced  by production variations  of dimensions.  Frequently,
simple  changes  in mounting  arrangements  can be made  which  will
materially reduce fabrication costs without detriment to the perfor-
mance of a system. One should also be certain that the tightly speci-
fied dimensions of a system are the truly critical dimensions, so that
time and money are not wasted in adhering to meaningless demands
for accuracy.
Surface quality.
The two major characteristics of an optical surface are
its quality and its accuracy. Accuracy refers to the dimensional char-
acteristics of a surface, i.e., the value and uniformity of the radius.
Quality refers to the finish of the surface, and includes such defects as
pits,  scratches,  incomplete  or  “gray”  polish,  stains,  and  the  like.
Quality is usually extended to similar defects within the element, such
as bubbles or inclusions. In general (with the exception of incomplete
polish which is almost never acceptable) these factors are merely cos-
metic or “beauty defects” and may be treated as such. The percentage
of light absorbed or scattered by such defects is usually a completely
negligible fraction of the total radiation passing through the system.
However, if the surface is in or near a focal plane, then the size of the
defect  must  be  considered  relative  to  the size  of the  detail  it  may
obscure in the image. Also, if a system is especially sensitive to stray
radiation, such defects may assume a functional importance. In any
case, one may evaluate the effect of a defect by comparing its area with
that of the system clear aperture at the surface in question.
560
Chapter Fifteen
The standards of military specification MIL-O-13830 (now formally
obsolete) are widely utilized in industry. The surface quality is speci-
fied by a number such as 80-50, in which the first two digits relate to
the apparent width of a tolerable scratch and the second two indicate
the diameter of a permissible dig, pit, or bubble in hundredths of a mil-
limeter. Thus, a surface specification of 80-50 would permit a scratch
of  an  apparent width which matched (by  visual  comparison)  a #80
standard scratch and a pit of 0.5-mm diameter. The total length of all
scratches and the number of pits are also limited by the specification.
In practice, the size of a defect is judged by a visual comparison with
a set of graded standard defects. Digs and pits can, of course, be read-
ily measured with a microscope; unfortunately the apparent width of
a scratch is not directly related to its physical size, and this portion of
the specification is not as well founded as one might desire. The con-
cept of a visual comparison with a standard is a good and efficient one.
McLeod  and  Sherwood,  who  originated  this  method  of  specifying
surface quality, in their article describing it said that the number of a
scratch was equal to the measured width in microns (micrometers) of
a scratch made by a certain technique. Recently the government has
used a relationship which indicates that the width in micrometers is
only one-tenth of the scratch number. There is a widespread (and not
unreasonable)  suspicion  that  the  widths  of  the  standard  scratches
(which are maintained on physical pieces of glass) have become small-
er in the decades since the 1940s (when the system originated.)
Surface qualities of 80-50 or coarser (i.e., larger) are relatively easily
fabricated. Qualities of 60-40 and 40-30 command a small premium in
cost. Surfaces with quality specifications of 40-20, 20-10, 10-5, or simi-
lar combinations require extremely careful processing, and the more
critical are considerably more expensive to fabricate. Such  specifica-
tions are usually reserved for field lenses, reticle blanks, or laser optics.
Surface accuracy.
Surface accuracy is usually specified in terms of the
wavelength of light from a sodium lamp (0.0005893 mm) or HeNe laser
(0.0006328 mm). It is determined by an interferometric comparison of
the surface with a test plate gage, by counting the number of (Newton’s)
rings or “fringes” and examining the regularity of the rings. As previ-
ously mentioned, the space between the surface of the work and the
test plate changes one-half wavelength for each fringe. The accuracy of
the fit between work and gage is described in terms of the number of
fringes seen when the gage is placed in contact with the work.
Test plates are made truly flat or truly spherical to an accuracy of a
small fraction of a fringe. Spherical test plates, however, have radii
which are known to an accuracy only as good as the optical-mechani-
cal means which are used to measure them. Thus the radius of a test
Optics in Practice
561
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested