c# open pdf file in browser : Delete page from pdf reader software SDK cloud windows wpf .net class smith_modern_optical_engineering6-part163

Note that if n
1
and n
3
are equal to 1.0 (i.e., the index of air), these
expressions reduce to Eqs. 2.36 and 2.37.
2.8 The “Thin Lens”
If the thickness of a lens element is small enough so that its effect on
the accuracy of the calculation may be neglected, the element is called
a thin lens. The “thin lens” concept is an extremely useful one for the
purposes  of  quick  preliminary  calculations  and  analysis  and  as  a
design tool.
The focal length of a thin lens can be derived from Eq. 2.36 by set-
ting the thickness equal to zero.
=(n - 1) (c
1
-c
2
)
(2.40)
=(n - 1)
-
(2.40a)
Since the lens thickness is assumed to be zero, the principal points of
a “thin lens” are coincident with the location of the lens. Thus, in com-
puting object and image positions, the distances s and s′ of Eqs. 2.4, 2.5,
2.7, etc., are measured from the lens itself. The term (c
1
-c
2
) is often
called the total curvature, or simply the curvature of the element.
Example E
An object 10 mm high is to be imaged 50 mm high on a screen that is
120 mm distant. What are the radii of an equiconvex lens of index 1.5
which will produce an image of the proper size and location?
The  first step in the calculation is the determination  of the  focal
length of the lens. Since the image is a real one, the magnification will
have a negative sign, and by Eq. 2.7a we have
m=
=(-)
=
or
s′ = -5s
For the object and image to be 120 mm apart,
120 = -s + s′ = -s - 5s = -6s
s= -20 mm
and
s′ = -5s = + 100 mm
Substituting into Eq. 2.4 and solving for f, we get
+
1
-20
1
f
1
100
s′
s
50
10
h′
h
1
R
2
1
R
1
1
f
1
f
42
Chapter Two
Delete page from pdf reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
copy pages from pdf into new pdf; acrobat extract pages from pdf
Delete page from pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from a pdf document; delete pdf pages reader
f= 16.67 mm
Noting that for an equiconvex lens R
1
=-R
2
, we use Eq. 2.40a to solve
for the radii
=+ 0.06 = (n - 1)
-
=0.5
R
1
=
=16.67 mm
R
2
=-R
1
=-16.67 mm
2.9 Mirrors
Acurved mirror surface has a focal length and is capable of forming
images just as a lens does. The equations for paraxial raytracing (Eqs.
2.31  and  2.32)  can  be  applied to  reflecting  surfaces  by  taking  into
account two additional sign conventions. The index of refraction of a
material was defined in the first chapter as the ratio of the velocity of
light in vacuum to that in the material. Since the direction of propa-
gation of light is reversed upon reflection, it is logical that the sign of
the velocity should be considered reversed, and the sign of the index
reversed as well. Thus the conventions are as follows.
1. The signs of all indices following a reflection are reversed, so the
index is negative when light travels right to left.
2. The signs of all spacings following a reflection are reversed if the
following surface is to the left.
Obviously if there are two reflecting surfaces in a system, the signs
of the indices and spacings are changed twice and, after the second
change, revert to the original positive signs, since the direction of prop-
agation is again left to right.
Figure 2.13 shows the locations of the focal and principal points of
concave and convex mirrors. The ray from the infinitely distant source
which defines the focal point can be traced as follows, setting n = 1.0
and n′ = -1.0:
nu = 0
(since the ray is parallel to the axis)
n′u′ = nu - y
=0 - y
=
thus
2y
R
(-1 - 1)

R
(n′ - n)

R
1
0.06
2
R
1
1
R
2
1
R
1
1
f
Image Formation (First-Order Optics)
43
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
delete pages on pdf online; delete pages from pdf in reader
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
delete blank pages in pdf; delete page from pdf online
u′ =
=
=
The final intercept length is
l′ =
=
=
and we find that the focal point lies halfway between the mirror and
its center of curvature.
The concave mirror is the equivalent of a positive converging lens
and forms a real image of distant objects. The convex mirror forms a
virtual image and is equivalent to a negative element. Because of the
index  sign  reversal  on  reflection,  the  sign  of  the  focal  length  is
reversed also and the focal length of a simple mirror is given by
f= -
so that the sign conforms to the convention of positive for converging
elements and negative for diverging elements.
Example F
Calculate the focal length of the Cassegrain mirror system shown in Fig.
2.14 if the radius of the primary mirror is 200 mm, the radius of the sec-
ondary  mirror  is 50  mm,  and  the  mirrors  are  separated  by 80  mm.
Following our sign convention, the radii are both negative and the dis-
tance from primary to secondary mirror is also considered negative, since
the light traverses this distance right to left. The index of the air is tak-
en as +1.0 before the primary and after the secondary; between the two,
the index is -1.0. Thus the optical data of the problem and the compu-
tation are  set up and carried through as  shown in Fig. 2.15. Careful
attention to signs is necessary in this calculation to avoid mistakes.
R
2
R
2
yR
2y
-y
u′
-2y
R
n′u′
-1
n′u′
n′
44
Chapter Two
Figure 2.13
The location of the focal points for reflecting
surfaces.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF: Insert PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Insert a New Page to PDF in VB.NET. Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program.
cut pages from pdf file; delete pdf pages in preview
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Delete and remove all image objects contained in a to remove a specific image from PDF document page. PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader component.
delete pages out of a pdf; cut pages out of pdf online
The focal length of the system is given by -y
1
/u′
2
=-1.0/-0.002 =
500 mm. The final intercept distance (from R
2
to the focus) is equal to
-y
2
/u′
2
=-0.2/-0.002 = 100 mm, and the focal point lies 20 mm to the
right of the primary mirror. Notice that the (second) principal plane is
completely outside the system, 400 mm to the left of the secondary
mirror, and that this type of system provides a long focal length and a
large image in a small, compact system.
2.10 Systems of Separated Components
It is often convenient to treat an optical system which is made up of
separated elements or components (i.e., a group of elements treated as
a unit) in terms of the component focal lengths and spacings instead of
handling  the system  by  means of surface-by-surface  calculation.  To
this end we can introduce the paraxial ray height y into the equations
of Sec. 2.3, just as we did in Sec. 2.6.
An optical component (which may be made up of a number of ele-
ments) is shown in Fig. 2.16 with its object a distance s from the first
principal plane and its image a distance s′ from the second principal
plane. The principal planes are planes of unit magnification, in that
the incident and  emergent ray paths  appear to  strike (and  emerge
from) the same height on the first and second principal planes. Thus,
in Fig.  2.16 a  ray from the  object point, which would (if  extended)
strike the first principal plane at a distance y from the axis, emerges
from the last surface of the system as if it were coming from the same
height y on the second principal plane. For this reason we can write
the following relationships:
Image Formation (First-Order Optics)
45
Figure  2.14
Cassegrain  mirror
system.  The  image  formed  by
the primary mirror is the virtual
object for the secondary mirror.
Figure 2.15
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Able to delete text characters
delete pdf pages acrobat; acrobat remove pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Delete image objects in selected PDF page in ASPX a specific image from PDF document page in VB.NET PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader component in
delete page from pdf document; delete pages pdf
u=
and
u′ =
and substitute s = -y/u and s′ = -y/u′ into Eq. 2.4:
=
=
u′ = u -
If we now replace the reciprocal focal length (1/f) with the component
power , we get the first equation of the set:
u′ = u - y
(2.41)
The transfer equations to the next component in the system are the
same  as  those  used  in  the  paraxial  surface-by-surface  raytrace  of 
Sec. 2.6:
y
2
=y
1
+du′
1
(2.42)
u′
1
=u
2
(2.43)
where y
1
and y
2
are the ray heights at the principal planes of compo-
nents  #1  and  #2,  u′
1
is  the  slope  angle  after  passing  through 
component #1, and d is the axial distance from the second principal
plane of component #1 to the first principal plane of component #2.
Note that these equations are equally applicable to  systems com-
posed of either thick or “thin” lenses. Obviously, when applied to thin
lenses, d becomes the spacing between elements, since the element
and its principal planes are coincident.
Focal lengths of two-component systems
The  preceding  equations  may  be  used  to  derive  compact  expres-
sions for the effective focal length and back focal length of a system 
comprised of two separated components. Let us assume that we have
two lenses of powers 
a
and 
b
separated by a distance d (if the lenses
y
f
1
f
-u
y
-u′
y
1
f
1
s
1
s′
-y
s′
-y
s
46
Chapter Two
Figure 2.16
The principal planes
are planes of unit magnification,
so a ray appears to leave the sec-
ond principal plane at the same
height  (y)  that  it  appears  to
strike the first principal plane.
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
BurnAnnotation: Burn all annotations to PDF page. DeleteAnnotation: Delete all selected annotations. guidance for you to create and add a PDF document viewer &
copy pages from pdf to word; delete pages from a pdf in preview
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in code able to help users delete text characters to pull text out of selected PDF page or all
delete pages from pdf preview; delete pages from pdf reader
are thin; if they are thick, d is the separation of their principal points).
The system is sketched in Fig. 2.17.
Beginning with a ray parallel to the axis which strikes lens a at y
a
,
we have
u
a
=0
u′
a
=0 - y
a
a
by Eq. 2.41
y
b
=y
a
-dy
a
a
=y
a
(1 - d
a
)
by Eq. 2.42
u′
b
=-y
a
a
-y
a
(1 - d
a
)
b
by Eq. 2.41
=-y
a
(
a
+
b
-d
a
b
)
The power (reciprocal focal length) of the system is given by
ab
=
=
=
a
+
b
-d
a
b
=
+
-
(2.44)
and thus
f
ab
=
(2.45)
The back focus distance (from the second principal point of b) is giv-
en by
B=
=
(2.46)
=
=
By substituting f
ab
/f
a
from Eq. 2.45, we get
B=
(2.46a)
The front focus distance (ffd) for the system is found by reversing the
raytrace (i.e., trace from right to left) or more simply by substituting f
b
for f
a
to get
(-)ffd =
(2.46b)
Frequently it is useful to be able to solve for the focal lengths of the
components when the focal length, back focus distance, and spacing
are given for the  system. Manipulation of Eqs. 2.45  and 2.46a  will
yield
f
ab
(f
b
-d)

f
b
f
ab
(f
a
-d)

f
a
f
b
(f
a
-d)

f
a
+f
b
-d
(1 - d/f
a
)

1/f
a
+1/f
b
-d/f
a
f
b
y
a
(1 - d
a
)

y
a
(
a
+
b
-d
a
b
)
-y
b
u′
b
f
a
f
b

f
a
+f
b
-d
d
f
a
f
b
1
f
b
1
f
a
-u′
b
y
a
1
f
ab
Image Formation (First-Order Optics)
47
f
a
=
(2.47)
f
b
=
(2.48)
General equations for two-component
systems
Using the same technique, we can derive expressions which give us
the  solution  to  all  two-component  optical  problems.  There  are  two
types of problems which occur. With reference to Fig. 2.18, the first
type occurs when we are given the required system magnification, the
positions  of  the  two  components,  and  the  object-to-image  distance
(neglecting  the  spaces  between  the  principal  planes  of  the  compo-
nents.) Thus, knowing s, s′, d, and the magnification m, we wish to
determine the powers (or focal lengths) of the two components, which
are given by
A
=
(2.49)
B
=
(2.50)
In the second type of problem we are faced with the inverse case, in
that we know the component powers, the desired object-to-image dis-
tance, and the magnification; we must determine the locations for the
two components. Under these circumstances the mathematics result in
a quadratic relationship, and thus there may be two solutions, one solu-
tion,  or  no  solution  (i.e.,  an  imaginary  solution.)  The  following 
(d - ms + s′)

ds′
(ms - md - s′)

msd
-dB

f
ab
-B - d
df
ab
f
ab
-B
48
Chapter Two
Figure 2.17
Raytrace through two separated components to deter-
mine the focal length and back focus distance of the combination.
quadratic equation in d (the spacing) is first solved for d [using the
standard equation x = (- b ± √b
2
-4
ac)
/2a to solve O = ax
2
+bx + c].
O= d
2
-dT + T (f
A
+f
B
)+
(2.51)
Then s and s′ are easily determined from
s=
(2.52)
s′ = T + s - d
(2.53)
Thus Eqs. 2.44 through 2.53 constitute a set of expressions which can
be used to solve any problem involving two components. Since two-
component systems  constitute the  vast  majority  of optical  systems,
these are extremely useful equations. Note that a change of the sign of
the magnification m from plus to minus will result in two completely
different optical systems. They will produce the same enlargement (or
reduction) of  the  image.  One will  have  an  erect, and  the other  an
inverted, image, but one system may be significantly more suitable
than the other for the intended application.
2.11 The Optical Invariant
The optical invariant, or Lagrange invariant, is a constant for a given
optical system, and it is a very useful one. Its numerical value may be
calculated in any of several ways, and the invariant may then be used
to arrive at the value of other quantities without the necessity of cer-
tain intermediate operations or raytrace calculations which would oth-
erwise be required.
(m - 1) d + T

(m - 1) -md
A
(m - 1)
2
f
A
f
B

m
Image Formation (First-Order Optics)
49
Figure 2.18
Atwo-component system operating at finite conjugates.
Let us consider the application of Eq. 2.31a to the tracing of two rays
through an optical system. One ray (the “axial” ray) is traced from the
foot, or axial intercept, of the object; the other ray (the “oblique” ray)
is traced from an off-axis point on the object. Figure 2.19 shows these
two rays passing through a generalized system.
Atany surface in the system, we can write out Eq. 2.31a for each ray,
using the subscript p to denote the data of the oblique ray.
For the axial ray
n′u′ = nu - y (n′ - n) c
For the oblique ray
n′u′
p
=nu
p
-y
p
(n′ - n) c
We now extract the common term (n′ - n)c from each equation and
equate the two expressions:
(n′ - n) c =
=
Multiplying by yy
p
and rearranging, we get
y
p
nu - ynu
p
=y
p
n′u′ - yn′u′
p
Note that on the left side of the equation the angles and indices are for
the left side of the surface (that is, before refraction) and that on the
right side of the equation the terms refer to the same quantities after
refraction. Thus y
p
nu - ynu
p
is a constant which is invariant across
any surface.
By a similar series of operations based on Eq. 2.32, we can show that
(y
p
nu - ynu
p
) for a given surface is equal to (y
p
nu - ynu
p
) for the next
surface. Thus this term is not only invariant across the surface but also
across the space between the surfaces; it is therefore invariant through-
out the entire optical system or any continuous part of the system.
Invariant
Inv = y
p
nu - ynu
p
=n (y
p
u- yu
p
)
(2.54)
nu
p
-n′u′
p

y
p
nu - n′u′

y
50
Chapter Two
Figure 2.19
The invariant and magnification
As an example of its application, we now write the invariant for the
object plane and image plan of Fig. 2.19. In an object plane y
p
=h,
n= n, y = 0, and we get
Inv = hnu - (0) nu
p
=hnu
In the corresponding image plane y
p
=h′, n = n′, y = 0, and we get
Inv = h′n′u′- (0) n′u′
p
=h′n′u′
Equating the two expressions gives
hnu = h′n′u′
(2.55)
which can be rearranged to give a very generalized expression for the
magnification of an optical system
m=
=
(2.56)
Equation  2.55  is,  of  course,  valid only  for  the extended  paraxial
region; this relationship is sometimes applied to trigonometric calcu-
lations, where it takes the form
hn sin u = h′n′ sin u′
(2.57)
Example G
We can apply the invariant to the calculation made in Example D by
assuming that only the axial ray has been traced. The axial ray slope at
the object was +0.0333…and the corresponding computed slope at the
image was found to be -0.047555.…Since the object and image were
both in air of index 1.0, we can find the image height from Eq. 2.56,
m=
=
=
=
h′ =
h′ = -14.0187
This value agrees with the height found in Example D by tracing a
ray from the tip of the object to the tip of the image. The saving of time
by the elimination of the calculation of this extra ray indicates the use-
fulness of the invariant.
20 (+0.0333)

-0.047555)
1.0 (+0.0333…)

1.0 (-0.047555…)
nu
n′u′
h′
20
h′
h
nu
n′u′
h′
h
Image Formation (First-Order Optics)
51
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested