c# open pdf file in browser : Delete pages in pdf online software control cloud windows web page asp.net class smith_modern_optical_engineering8-part169

the  primary  image  defects  are  usually  referred  to  as  the  Seidel
aberrations.
3.2 The Aberration Polynomial and the
Seidel Aberrations
With reference to Fig. 3.1, we assume an optical system with symme-
try about the optical axis so that every surface is a figure of rotation
about the optical axis. Because of this symmetry, we can, without any
loss of generality, define the object point as lying on the y axis; its dis-
tance from the optical axis is y = h. We define a ray starting from the
object  point  and  passing  through  the  system  aperture  at  a  point
described by its polar coordinates (s, θ). The ray intersects the image
plane at the point x′, y′.
We wish to know the form of the equation which will describe the
image plane intersection coordinates y′ and x′ as a function of h, s, and
θ; the equation will be a power series expansion. While it is impracti-
cal to derive an exact expression for other than very simple systems or
for more than a few terms of the power series, it is possible to deter-
mine the general form of the equation. This is simply because we have
assumed  an axially  symmetrical system.  For  example,  a ray which
62
Chapter Three
Figure 3.1
Aray from the point y =h, (x =0) in the object passes through the opti-
cal system aperture at a point defined by its polar coordinates, (s,θ), and intersects
the image surface at x′,y′.
Delete pages in pdf online - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page from pdf; delete page in pdf preview
Delete pages in pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
cut pages out of pdf file; pdf delete page
intersects the axis in object space must also intersect it in image space.
Every ray passing through the same axial point in object space and
also passing through the same annular zone in the aperture (i.e., with
the same value of s) must pass through the same axial point in image
space. A ray in front of the meridional (y, z) plane has a mirror-image
ray  behind  the  meridional  plane  which  is  identical  except  for  the
(reversed)  signs  of  x′ and θ.  Similarly,  rays  originating  from  ±h in
the object and passing through corresponding upper and lower aper-
ture points must have identical x′ intersections and oppositely signed
y′ values. With this sort of logic one can derive equations such as the 
following:
y′ = A
1
scos θ + A
2
h
+B
1
s
3
cos θ + B
2
s
2
h(2 + cos 2θ) + (3B
3
+B
4
)sh
2
cos θ + B
5
h
3
+C
1
s
5
cos θ + (C
2
+C
3
cos 2θ)s
4
h+ (C
4
+C
6
cos
2
θ)s
3
h
2
cos θ
+(C
7
+C
8
cos 2θ)s
2
h
3
+C
10
sh
4
cos θ + C
12
h
5
+D
1
s
7
cos θ +
...
(3.1)
x′ = A
1
ssin θ
+B
1
s
3
sin θ + B
2
s
2
hsin 2θ + (B
3
+ B
4
)sh
2
sin θ
+C
1
s
5
sin θ + C
3
s
4
hsin 2θ + (C
5
+C
6
cos
2
θ)s
3
h
2
sin θ
+C
9
s
2
h
3
sin 2θ + C
11
sh
4
sin θ + D
1
s
7
sin θ +
...
(3.2)
where A
n
, B
n
,etc., are constants, and h, s, and θ have been defined
above and in Fig. 3.1.
Notice that in the A terms the exponents of s and h are unity. In the
Bterms the exponents total 3, as in s
3
,s
2
h, sh
2
, and h
3
. In the C terms
the exponents total 5, and in the D terms, 7. These are referred to as
the first-order, third-order, and fifth-order terms, etc. There are 2 first-
order terms, 5 third-order, 9 fifth-order, and
-1
nth-order terms. In an axially symmetrical system there are no even-
order terms; only odd-order terms may exist (unless we depart from
symmetry as, for example, by tilting a surface or introducing a toroidal
or other nonsymmetrical surface).
It is apparent that the A terms relate to the paraxial (or first-order)
imagery discussed in Chap. 2. A
2
is simply the magnification (h′/h),
and A
1
is a transverse measure of the distance from the paraxial focus
to our “image plane.” All the other terms in Eqs. 3.1 and 3.2 are called
(n + 3) (n + 5)

8
Aberrations
63
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pages from a pdf reader; delete page on pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pages pdf file; delete a page in a pdf file
transverse aberrations. They represent the distance by which the ray
misses the  ideal image  point  as  described by  the  paraxial  imaging
equations of Chap. 2.
The B terms are called the third-order, or Seidel, or primary aberra-
tions. B
1
is spherical aberration, B
2
is coma, B
3
is astigmatism, B
4
is
Petzval, and B
5
is distortion. Similarly, the C terms are called the fifth-
order or secondary aberrations. C
1
is fifth-order spherical aberration;
C
2
and C
3
are linear coma; C
4
,C
5
, and C
6
are oblique spherical aberra-
tion; C
7
, C
8
, and C
9
are elliptical coma; C
10
and C
11
are Petzval and
astigmatism; and C
12
is distortion.
The 14 terms in D are the seventh-order or tertiary aberrations; D
1
is  the  seventh-order  spherical  aberration.  A similar  expression  for
OPD, the wave front deformation, is given in Chap. 11.
As noted above, the Seidel aberrations of a system in monochromat-
ic  light  are  called spherical  aberration,  coma,  astigmatism, Petzval
curvature, and distortion. In this section we will define each aberra-
tion and discuss its characteristics, its representation, and its effect on
the appearance of the image. Each aberration will be discussed as if it
alone  were  present;  obviously  in  practice  one  is  far  more  likely  to
encounter  aberrations  in  combination  than  singly.  The  third-order
aberrations can be calculated using the methods given in Chap. 10.
Spherical aberration
Spherical aberration can be defined as the variation of focus with aper-
ture. Figure 3.2 is a somewhat exaggerated sketch of a simple lens
forming  an  “image” of  an  axial  object  point  a  great  distance away.
Notice that the rays close to the optical axis come to a focus (intersect
the axis) very near the paraxial focus position. As the ray height at the
lens increases, the position of the ray intersection with the optical axis
moves farther and farther from the paraxial focus. The distance from
the paraxial focus to the axial intersection of the ray is called longitu-
dinal spherical aberration. Transverse, or lateral, spherical aberration
is the name given to the aberration when it is measured in the “verti-
cal”  direction. Thus, in  Fig. 3.2 AB is the longitudinal, and  AC the
transverse spherical aberration of ray R.
Since the magnitude of the aberration obviously depends on the height
of the ray, it is convenient to specify the particular ray with which a cer-
tain amount of aberration is associated. For example, marginal spherical
aberration refers to the aberration of the ray through the edge or margin
of the lens aperture. It is often written as LA
m
or TA
m
.
Spherical aberration is determined by tracing a paraxial ray and a
trigonometric ray from the same axial object point and determining
their final intercept distances l′ and L′. In Fig. 3.2, l′ is distance OA
64
Chapter Three
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET
delete pdf pages online; delete pages from pdf without acrobat
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete blank pages in pdf files; delete pdf pages android
and L′ (for ray R) is distance OB. The longitudinal spherical aberra-
tion of the image point is abbreviated LA′ and
LA′ = L′ - l′
(3.3)
Transverse spherical aberration is related to LA′ by the expression
TA′
R
=-LA′ tan U′
R
=-(L′ - l′) tan U′
R
(3.4)
where U′
R
is the angle the ray R makes with the axis. Using this sign
convention, spherical aberration with a negative sign is called under-
corrected spherical, since it is usually associated with simple uncor-
rected  positive  elements.  Similarly,  positive  spherical  is  called
overcorrected and is generally associated with diverging elements.
The spherical aberration of a system is usually represented graphi-
cally. Longitudinal spherical is plotted against the ray height at the
lens, as shown in Fig. 3.3a, and transverse spherical is plotted against
the final slope of the ray, as shown in Fig. 3.3b. Figure 3.3b is called a
ray intercept curve. It is conventional to plot the ray through the top of
the lens on the right in a ray intercept plot regardless of the sign con-
vention used for ray slope angles.
For a given aperture and focal length, the amount of spherical aber-
ration in a simple lens is a function of object position and the shape, or
bending, of the lens. For example, a thin glass lens with its object at
infinity has a minimum amount of spherical at a nearly plano-convex
shape, with the convex surface toward the object. A meniscus shape,
either  convex-concave  or  concave-convex  has  much  more  spherical
aberration. If the object and image are of equal size (each being two
focal lengths from the lens), then the shape which gives the minimum
spherical is equiconvex. Usually, a uniform distribution of the amount
that a ray is “bent” or deviated will minimize the spherical.
Aberrations
65
Figure  3.2
A simple  converging  lens  with  undercorrected
spherical  aberration.  The  rays  farther  from  the  axis  are
brought to a focus nearer the lens.
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
delete page pdf file reader; delete pages of pdf
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pages on pdf online; add and delete pages in pdf
The image of a point formed by a lens with spherical aberration is
usually a bright dot surrounded by a halo of light; the effect of spher-
ical on an extended image is to soften the contrast of the image and to
blur its details.
In  general,  a  positive,  converging  lens  or  surface  will  contribute
undercorrected spherical aberration to a system, and a negative lens
or divergent surface,  the reverse, although there are  certain excep-
tions to this.
Figure 3.3 illustrated two ways to present spherical aberration, as
either a longitudinal or a transverse aberration. Equation 3.4 showed
the relation between the two. The same relationship is also appropri-
ate for astigmatism and field curvature  (Sec. 3.2.3) and axial chro-
matic (Sec. 3.3). Note that coma, distortion, and lateral chromatic do
not have a longitudinal measure. All  of the aberrations can also be
expressed as angular aberrations. The angular aberration is simply
the angle subtended from the second nodal (or in air, principal) point
by the transverse aberration. Thus
AA =
(3.5)
Yet a fourth way to measure an aberration is by OPD, the departure of
the actual wave front from a perfect reference sphere centered on the
ideal image point, as discussed in Sec. 3.6 and Chap. 11.
The transverse measure of an aberration is directly related to the
size of the image blur. Graphing it as a ray intercept plot (e.g., Fig.
3.3b and Fig. 3.24) allows the viewer to identify the various types of
aberration afflicting the optical system. This is of great value to the
TA
s′
66
Chapter Three
Figure  3.3
Graphical  representation  of  spherical  aberration. 
(a)  As  a  longitudinal  aberration,  in which  the  longitudinal
spherical aberration  (LA′) is plotted against ray height  (Y).
(b) As a transverse aberration, in which the ray intercept height
(H′) at the paraxial reference plane is plotted against the final
ray slope (tan U′).
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. Explanation about transparency. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online. This
add and remove pages from pdf file online; delete pages from a pdf file
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pages pdf document; delete page in pdf document
lens designer, and the ray intercept plot of the transverse aberrations
is an almost universally used presentation of the aberrations. As dis-
cussed later (in Chap. 11), the OPD, or wave-front deformation, is the
most useful measure of image quality for well-corrected systems, and
a statement of the amount of the OPD is usually accepted as definitive
in this regard. The longitudinal presentation of the aberrations is most
useful in understanding field curvature and axial chromatic, especially
secondary spectrum.
Coma
Coma can be defined as the variation of magnification with aperture.
Thus, when a bundle of oblique rays is incident on a lens with coma,
the rays passing through the edge portions of the lens may be imaged
at a different height than those passing through the center portion. In
Fig. 3.4, the upper and lower rim rays A and B, respectively, intersect
the image  plane  above  the  ray  P which passes  through  the center 
of the lens. The distance from P to the intersection of A and B is called
the tangential coma of the lens, and is given by
Coma
T
=H′
AB
-H′
P
(3.6)
where H′
AB
is the height from the optical axis to the intersection of the
upper  and  lower  rim  rays,  and  H′
P
is  the  height  from  the  axis  to 
the intersection of the ray P with the plane perpendicular to the axis
and passing through the intersection of A and B. The appearance of a
point image formed by a comatic lens is indicated in Fig. 3.5. Obviously
the aberration is named after the comet shape of the figure.
Figure 3.6 indicates the relationship between the position at which
the ray passes through  the lens aperture  and the location which it
occupies in the coma patch. Figure 3.6a represents a head-on view of
the lens aperture, with ray positions indicated by the letters A through
Aberrations
67
Figure 3.4
In the presence of coma, the rays through the out-
er portions of the lens focus at a different height than the
rays through the center of the lens.
Hand A′ through D′, with the primed rays in the inner circle. The
resultant  coma  patch  is  shown  in  Fig.  3.6b  with  the  ray  locations
marked with corresponding letters. Notice that the rays which formed
a circle on the aperture also form a circle in the coma patch, but as the
rays go around the aperture circle once, they go around the image cir-
cle twice in accord with the B
2
terms in Eqs. 3.1 and 3.2. The primed
rays of the smaller circle in the aperture also form a correspondingly
smaller circle in the image, and the central ray P is at the point of the
figure. Thus the comatic image can be viewed as being made up of a
series of different-sized circles arranged tangent to a 60° angle. The
size of the image circle is proportional to the square of the diameter of
the aperture circle.
68
Chapter Three
Figure 3.5
The coma patch. The
image of a point source is spread
out into a comet-shaped flare.
Figure 3.6
The relationship between the position of a ray
in the lens aperture and its position in the coma patch. 
(a) View of the lens aperture with rays indicated by letters.
(b) The letters indicate the positions of the corresponding
rays in the image figure. Note that the diameters of the
circles in the image are proportional to the square of the
diameters in the aperture.
In Fig. 3.6b the distance from P to AB is the tangential coma of Eq.
3.6. The distance from P to CD is called the sagittal coma and is one-
third as large as the tangential coma. About half of all the energy in
the coma patch is concentrated in the small triangular area between P
and CD; thus the sagittal coma is a somewhat better measure of the
effective size of the image blur than is the tangential coma.
Coma is a particularly disturbing aberration since its flare is non-
symmetrical. Its presence is very detrimental to accurate determina-
tion of the image position since it is much more difficult to locate the
“center of gravity” of a coma patch than for a circular blur such as that
produced by spherical aberration.
Coma varies with the shape of the lens element and also with the
position of any apertures or diaphragms which limit the bundle of rays
forming the image. In an axially symmetrical system there is no coma
on the optical axis. The size of the coma patch varies linearly with its
distance from the axis. The offense against the Abbe sine condition
(OSC) is discussed in Chap. 10.
Astigmatism and field curvature
In the preceding section on coma, we introduced the terms “tangential”
and “sagittal”; a fuller discussion of these terms is appropriate at this
point. If a lens system is represented by a drawing of its axial section,
rays which lie in the plane of the drawing are called meridional ortan-
gential rays. Thus rays A, P, and B of Fig. 3.6 are tangential rays.
Similarly, the plane through the axis is referred to as the meridional
or tangential plane, as may any plane through the axis.
Rays which do not lie in a meridional plane are called skew rays. The
oblique meridional ray through the center of the aperture of a lens sys-
tem is called the principal, or chief, ray. If we imagine a plane passing
through the chief ray and perpendicular to the meridional plane, then
the (skew) rays from  the  object which lie in this sagittal  plane  are
sagittal rays. Thus in Fig. 3.6 all the rays except A, A′, P, B′, and B
are skew rays, and the sagittal rays are C, C′, D′, and D.
As shown in Fig. 3.7, the image of a point source formed by an oblique
fan of rays in the tangential plane will be a line image; this line, called
the tangential image, is perpendicular to the tangential plane; i.e., it lies
in the sagittal plane. Conversely, the image formed by the rays of the
sagittal fan is a line which lies in the tangential plane.
Astigmatism  occurs  when  the  tangential  and  sagittal  (sometimes
called radial) images do not coincide. In the presence of astigmatism,
the image of a point source is not a point, but takes the form of two sep-
arate lines as shown in Fig. 3.7. Between the astigmatic foci the image
is an elliptical or circular blur. (Note that if diffraction effects are sig-
nificant, this blur may take on a square or diamond characteristic.)
Aberrations
69
Unless a lens is poorly made, there is no astigmatism when an axial
point is imaged. As the imaged point moves further from the axis, the
amount of astigmatism gradually increases. Off-axis images seldom lie
exactly in a true plane; when there is primary astigmatism in a lens
system,  the  images  lie  on curved  surfaces  which  are  paraboloid  in
shape. The shape of these image surfaces is indicated for a simple lens
in Fig. 3.8.
The amount of astigmatism in a lens is a function of the power and
shape  of  the lens  and its distance from  the aperture or diaphragm
which limits the size of the bundle of rays passing through the lens. In
the case of a simple lens or mirror whose own diameter limits the size
of the ray bundle, the astigmatism is equal to the square of the dis-
tance from the axis to the image (i.e., the image height) divided by the
focal length of the element, i.e., -h
2
/f.
Every optical system has associated with it a sort of basic field cur-
vature, called the Petzval curvature, which is a function of the index
of refraction of the lens elements and their surface curvatures. When
there is no astigmatism, the sagittal and tangential image surfaces
coincide with each other and lie on the Petzval surface. When there is
primary astigmatism present, the tangential image surface lies three
times as far from the Petzval surface as the sagittal image; note that
both image surfaces are on the same side of the Petzval surface, as
indicated in Fig. 3.8.
When the tangential image is to the left of the sagittal image (and
both are to the left of the Petzval surface) the astigmatism is called neg-
ative, undercorrected, or inward-(toward the lens) curving. When the
70
Chapter Three
Figure 3.7
Astigmatism.
order is reversed, the astigmatism is overcorrected, or backward-curv-
ing. In Fig. 3.8, the astigmatism is undercorrected and all three surfaces
are inward-curving. It is possible to have overcorrected (backward curv-
ing) Petzval and undercorrected (inward) astigmatism, or vice versa.
Positive lenses introduce inward curvature of the Petzval surface to
 system,  and  negative  lenses  introduce  backward  curvature.  The
Petzval curvature (i.e., the longitudinal departure of the Petzval sur-
face from the ideal flat image surface) of a thin simple element is equal
to one-half the square of the image height divided by the focal length
and index of the element, -h
2
/2nf. Note that “field curvature” means
the longitudinal departure of the focal surfaces from the ideal image
surface (which is usually flat) and not the reciprocal of the radius of
the image surface.
Distortion
When the image of an off-axis point is formed farther from the axis or
closer to the axis than the image height given by the paraxial expres-
sions of Chap. 2, the image of an extended object is said to be distort-
ed. The amount of distortion is the displacement of the image from the
paraxial position, and can be expressed either directly or as a percent-
age of the ideal image height, which, for an infinitely distant object, is
equal to h′ = f tan θ.
The  amount  of  distortion  ordinarily  increases  as  the  image  size
increases;  the  distortion itself usually  increases as the  cube  of  the
image height (percentage distortion increases as the square). Thus, if
a centered rectilinear object is imaged by a system afflicted with dis-
tortion, it can be seen that the images of the corners will be displaced
more  (in proportion) than the  images  of  the  points  making up  the
sides. Figure 3.9 shows the appearance of a square figure imaged by a
Aberrations
71
Figure  3.8
The  primary  astig-
matism  of  a  simple  lens.  The
tangential image is three times
as far from the Petzval surface
as the sagittal image. Note that
the figure is to scale.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested