c# open pdf file in browser : Delete pages from pdf document software SDK dll winforms windows asp.net web forms smith_modern_optical_engineering9-part170

lens system with distortion. In Fig. 3.9a the distortion is such that the
images are displaced outward from the correct position, resulting in a
flaring or pointing of the corners. This is overcorrected, or pincushion,
distortion. In Fig. 3.9b the distortion is of the opposite type and the
corners of the square are pulled inward more than the sides; this is
negative, or barrel, distortion.
Alittle study of the matter will show that a system which produces
distortion of one sign will produce distortion of the opposite sign when
object and image are interchanged. Thus a camera lens with barrel
distortion will have pincushion distortion if used as a projection lens
(i.e., when the film is replaced by a slide). Obviously if the same lens
is used both to photograph and to project the slide, the projected image
will be rectilinear (free of distortion) since the distortion in the slide
will be canceled out upon projection.
3.3 Chromatic Aberrations
Because of the fact that the index of refraction varies as a function of the
wavelength of light, the properties of optical elements also vary with
wavelength. Axial chromatic aberration is the longitudinal variation of
focus  (or  image  position)  with  wavelength.  In  general,  the  index  of
refraction of optical materials is higher for short wavelengths than for
long wavelengths; this causes the short wavelengths to be more strong-
ly refracted at each surface of a lens so that in a simple positive lens, for
example, the blue light rays are brought to a focus closer to the lens
than the red rays. The distance along the axis between the two focus
points is the longitudinal axial chromatic aberration. Figure 3.10 shows
the chromatic aberration of a simple positive element. When the short-
wavelength rays are brought to a focus to the left of the long-wavelength
rays, the chromatic is termed undercorrected, or negative.
The image of an axial point in the presence of chromatic aberration
is a central bright dot surrounded by a halo. The rays of light which
are in focus, and those which are nearly in focus, form the bright dot.
72
Chapter Three
Figure 3.9
Distortion. (a) Positive,
or  pincushion, 
distortion. 
(b) Negative,  or  barrel,  distor-
tion. The sides of the image are
curved because the  amount  of
distortion varies as the cube of
the distance from the axis. Thus,
in the case of a square, the cor-
ners are distorted 2√2
as much
as the center of the sides.
Delete pages from pdf document - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page pdf online; delete pages on pdf file
Delete pages from pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page from pdf preview; delete pages out of a pdf
The out-of-focus rays form the halo. Thus, in an undercorrected visual
instrument,  the  image  would  have  a  yellowish  dot  (formed  by  the
orange, yellow, and green rays) and a purplish halo (due to the red and
blue rays). If the screen on which the image is formed is moved toward
the lens, the central dot will become blue; if it is moved away, the cen-
tral dot will become red.
When  a lens system forms  images  of  different  sizes for  different
wavelengths, or spreads the image of an off-axis point into a rainbow,
the difference between the image heights for different colors is called
lateral color, or chromatic difference of magnification. In Fig. 3.11 a
simple lens with a displaced diaphragm is shown forming an image of
an off-axis point. Since the diaphragm limits the rays which reach the
lens,  the  ray  bundle  from  the  off-axis point  strikes  the lens  above 
the axis and is bent downward as well as being brought to a focus. The
blue rays are bent downward more than the red and thus form their
image nearer the axis.
The  chromatic  variation of index  also  produces  a variation  of  the
monochromatic aberrations discussed in Sec. 3.2. Since each aberration
results from the manner in which the rays are bent at the surfaces of
the optical system, it is to be expected that, since rays of different col-
or are bent differently, the aberrations will be somewhat different for
each color. In general this proves to be the case, and these effects are of
practical importance when the basic aberrations are well corrected.
3.4 The Effect of Lens Shape and Stop
Position on the Aberrations
Aconsideration of either the thick-lens focal length equation
=(n - 1)
-
+
t
R
1
R
2
n- 1
n
1
R
2
1
R
1
1
f
Aberrations
73
Figure 3.10
The undercorrected longitudinal chromatic aberration of a simple
lens is due to the blue rays undergoing a greater refraction than the red rays.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete page from pdf document; delete pages from pdf file online
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing
delete pdf pages ipad; delete a page from a pdf file
or the thin-lens focal length equation
=(n - 1)
-
=(n - 1) (C
1
-C
2
)
reveals that for a given index and thickness, there is an infinite number
of combinations of R
1
and R
2
which will produce a given focal length.
Thus a lens of some desired power may take on any number of different
shapes or “bendings.” The aberrations of the lens are changed marked-
ly as the shape is changed; this effect is the basic tool of optical design.
As an illustrative example, we will consider the aberrations of a thin
positive lens made of borosilicate crown glass with a focal length of 100
mm and a clear aperture of 100 mm (a speed of f/10) which is to image
an infinitely distant object over a field of view of ±17°. A typical borosil-
icate crown is 517:642, which has an index of 1.517 for the helium d
line ( = 5876 Å), an index of 1.51432 for C light ( = 6563 Å), and an
index of 1.52238 for F light ( = 4861 Å).
(The aberration  data presented  in the following paragraphs  were
calculated by means of the thin-lens third-order aberration equations
of Chap. 10.)
If we first assume that the stop or limiting aperture is in coincidence
with the lens, we find that several aberrations do not vary as the lens
shape is varied. Axial chromatic aberration is constant at a value of
-1.55 mm (undercorrected); thus the blue focus (F light) is 1.55 mm
nearer the lens than the red focus (C light). The astigmatism and field
curvature are also constant. At the edge of the field (30 mm from the
axis) the sagittal focus is 7.5 mm closer to the lens than the paraxial
focus, and the tangential focus is 16.5 mm inside the paraxial focus.
Two aberrations, distortion and lateral color, are zero when the stop is
at the lens.
1
R
2
1
R
1
1
f
74
Chapter Three
Figure 3.11
Lateral  color,  or chromatic difference  of  magnification,
results in different-sized images for different wavelengths.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete page from pdf online; delete pages from pdf preview
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Create the new document with 3 pages. String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; newDoc.Save(outputFilePath);
delete pages from a pdf document; add and delete pages from pdf
Spherical aberration and coma, however, vary greatly as the lens
shape is changed. Figure 3.12 shows the amount of these two aberra-
tions  plotted  against  the  curvature  of the  first  surface of  the lens.
Notice that coma varies linearly with lens shape, taking a large posi-
tive value when the  lens is  a  meniscus with  both  surfaces concave
toward the object. As the lens is bent through plano-convex, convex-
plano, and convex meniscus shapes, the amount of coma becomes more
negative, assuming a zero value near the convex-plano form.
The spherical aberration of this lens is always undercorrected; its
plot has the shape of a parabola with a vertical axis. Notice that the
spherical aberration reaches a minimum (or more accurately, a maxi-
mum) value at approximately the same shape for which the coma is
zero. This, then, is the shape that one would select if the lens were to
be used as a telescope objective to cover a rather small field of view.
Note  that if  both  object and image  are  “real” (i.e., not  virtual),  the
spherical aberration of a positive lens is always negative (undercor-
rected).
Let us now select a particular shape for the lens, say, C
1
=-0.02
and investigate the effect of placing the stop away from the lens, as
shown in Fig. 3.13. The spherical and axial chromatic aberrations are
Aberrations
75
Figure 3.12
Spherical aberration and coma as a function of lens
shape. Data plotted are for a 100-mm focal length lens (with
the stop at the lens) at f/10 covering ±17° field.
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
' Create the new document with 3 pages. Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf" newDoc.Save(outputFilePath).
delete pages pdf online; add or remove pages from pdf
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. How to delete a range of pages from a Word document. How to delete several defined pages from a Word document.
delete page pdf acrobat reader; reader extract pages from pdf
completely unchanged by shifting the stop, since the axial rays strike
the lens in exactly the same manner regardless of where the stop is
located. The lateral color and distortion, however, take on positive val-
ues when the stop is behind the lens and negative when it is before the
lens. Figure 3.14 shows a plot of lateral color, distortion, coma, and
tangential field curvature as a function of the stop position. The most
pronounced effects of moving the stop are found in the variations of
coma and astigmatism. As the stop is moved toward the object, the
coma decreases linearly with stop position, and has a zero value when
the  stop  is  about  18.5  mm  in  front  of  the  lens.  The  astigmatism
becomes  less  negative  so that  the  position  of the  tangential  image
approaches the paraxial focal plane. Since astigmatism is a quadratic
function of stop position, the tangential field curvature (x
t
) plots as a
parabola. Notice that the parabola has a maximum at the same stop
position for which the coma is zero. This is called the natural position
of the stop, and for all lenses with undercorrected primary spherical
aberration, the natural, or coma-free, stop position produces a more
backward curving (or less inward curving) field than any other stop
position.
Figure 3.12 showed the effect of lens shape with the stop fixed in
contact with the lens, and Fig. 3.14 showed the effect of stop position
with the lens shape held constant. There is a “natural” stop position
for each shape of the simple lens we are considering. In Fig. 3.15, the
aberrations of the lens have again been plotted against the lens shape;
however, in this figure, the aberration values are those which occur
when the stop is in the natural position. Thus, for each bending the
coma has been removed by choosing this stop position, and the field is
as far backward curving as possible.
Notice that the shape which produces minimum spherical aberra-
tion also produces the maximum field curvature, so that this shape,
76
Chapter Three
Figure  3.13
The  aperture  stop
away from the lens. Notice that
the  oblique  ray  bundle  passes
through  an  entirely  different
part of the lens when the stop is
in front of the lens than when it
is behind the lens.
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
C#.NET PDF SDK - Edit PDF Document Metadata in C#.NET. Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project.
delete a page from a pdf reader; delete page from pdf reader
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET
C#. How to delete a range of pages from a PowerPoint document. C#. How to delete several defined pages from a PowerPoint document.
delete pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf acrobat
which gives the best image near the axis, is not suitable for wide field
coverage. The meniscus shapes at either side of the figure represent a
much better choice for a wide field, for although the spherical aberra-
tion is much larger at these bendings, the field is much more nearly
flat. This is the type of lens used in inexpensive cameras at speeds of
f/11 or f/16.
3.5 Aberration Variation with Aperture 
and Field
In the preceding section, we considered the effect of lens shape and
aperture position on the aberrations of a simple lens, and in that dis-
cussion we assumed that the lens operated at a fixed aperture of f/10
(stop diameter of 10 mm) and covered a fixed field of ±17° (field diam-
eter of 60 mm). It is often useful to know how the aberrations of such
a lens vary when the size of the aperture or field is changed.
Figure  3.16 lists  the  relationships  between the primary aberra-
tions and the semi-aperture y (in column one) and the image height
Aberrations
77
Figure 3.14
Effect of shifting the stop position on the aberrations of a sim-
ple lens. The arrow indicates the “natural” stop position where coma is
zero. (efl =100,C
1
=-0.02, speed = f/10, field = ±17°.)
h(in column two). To illustrate the use of this table, let us assume
that we have a lens whose aberrations are known; we wish to deter-
mine the size of the aberrations if the aperture diameter is increased
by 50 percent and the field coverage reduced by 50 percent. The new
ywill be 1.5 times the original, and the new h will be 0.5 times the
original.
Since longitudinal spherical aberration is shown to vary with y
2
, the
1.5 times increase in aperture will cause the spherical to be (1.5)
2
, or
2.25, times as large. Similarly transverse spherical, which varies as y
3
,
will be (1.5)
3
, or  3.375,  times  larger (as  will the image  blur due to
spherical).
Coma varies as y
2
and h; thus, the coma will be (1.5)
2
×0.5, or 1.125,
times as large. The Petzval curvature and astigmatism, which vary
with h
2
, will be reduced to (0.5)
2
, or 0.25, of their previous value, while
the blurs due to  astigmatism or field curvature will be  1.5(0.5)
2
, or
0.375, of their original size.
The aberrations of a lens also depend on the position of the object
and  image. A lens  which  is  well  corrected  for an  infinitely  distant
78
Chapter Three
Figure 3.15
The variation of the aberrations with lens shape when the
stop is located in the “natural” (coma free) position for each shape. Data
is for 100-mm f/10 lens covering ±17° field, made from BSC-2 glass
(517:645).
object, for example, may be very poorly corrected if used to image a
nearby  object.  This  is  because  the  ray  paths  and  incidence  angles
change as the object position changes.
It should be obvious that if allthe dimensions of an optical system are
scaled up or  down,  the linear aberrations  are  also  scaled in  exactly
the same proportion. Thus if the simple lens used as the example in
Sec.  3.4  were  increased  in  focal  length  to  200  mm,  its  aperture
increased to 20 mm, and the field coverage increased to 120 mm, then
the aberrations would all be doubled. Note, however, that the speed, or
f/number,  would  remain  at  f/10  and  the  angular  coverage  would
remain at ±17 . The percentage distortion would not be changed.
Aberrations are occasionally expressed as angular aberrations. For
example, the transverse spherical aberration of a system subtends an
angle from the second principal point of the system; this angle is the
angular spherical aberration. Note that the angular aberrations are
not changed by scaling the size of the optical system.
3.6 Optical Path Difference (Wave Front
Aberration)
Aberrations can also be described in terms of the wave nature of light.
In Chap. 1, it was pointed out that the light waves converging to form
a “perfect” image would be spherical in shape. Thus when aberrations
are present in a lens system, the waves converging on an image point
are deformed from the ideal shape (which is a sphere centered on the
image point). For example, in the presence of undercorrected spherical
aberration the wave front is curled inward at the edges, as shown in
Fig. 3.17. This can be understood if we remember that a ray is the path
Aberrations
79
Figure 3.16
The variation of the primary aberrations with aperture and field.
of a point on the wave front and that the ray is also normal to the wave
front. Thus, if the ray is to intersect the axis to the left of the paraxial
focus, the section of the wave front associated with the ray must be
curled  inward.  The  wave  front  shown  is  “ahead”  of  the  reference
sphere; the distance by which it is ahead is called the optical path dif-
ference, or OPD, and is customarily expressed in units of wavelengths.
The  wave  fronts  associated  with axial  aberrations  are symmetrical
figures of rotation, in contrast to the off-axis aberrations such as coma
and astigmatism. For example, the wave front for astigmatism would
be a section of a torus (the outer surface of a doughnut) with different
radii  in  the  prime  meridians.  For  off-axis  imagery,  the  reference
sphere is chosen to pass through the center of the exit pupil (in some
calculations, the reference sphere  has  an infinite radius,  for  conve-
nience in computing).
3.7 Aberration Correction and Residuals
Section 3.4 indicated two methods which are used to control aberra-
tions in simple optical systems, namely lens shape and stop position.
For many applications a higher level of correction is needed, and it is
then necessary to combine optical elements with aberrations of oppo-
site signs so that the aberrations contributed to the system by one ele-
ment are cancelled out, or corrected, by the others. A typical example
is the achromatic doublet used for telescope objectives, shown in Fig.
3.18. A single positive element would be afflicted with both undercor-
rected spherical aberration and undercorrected chromatic aberration.
In a negative element, in the other hand, both aberrations are over-
corrected. In the doublet a positive element is combined with a less
80
Chapter Three
Figure 3.17
The optical path difference (OPD) is the dis-
tance between the emerging wave front and a reference
sphere (centered in the image plane) which coincides
with the wave front at the axis. The OPD is thus the dif-
ference between the marginal and axial paths through
the system for an axial point.
powerful negative element in such a way that the aberrations of each
balance out. The positive lens is made of a (crown) glass with a low
chromatic dispersion, and the negative element of a (flint) glass with
a high dispersion. Thus, the negative element has a greater amount of
chromatic aberration per unit of power, by virtue of its greater disper-
sion, than the crown element. The relative powers of the elements are
chosen so that the chromatic exactly cancels while the focusing power
of the crown element dominates.
The situation with regard to spherical aberration is quite analogous
except that element power, shape, and index of refraction are involved
instead of power and dispersion as in chromatic. If the index of the
negative element is higher than the positive, the inner surface is diver-
gent, and will contribute overcorrected spherical to balance the under-
correction of the outer surfaces.
Aberration correction usually is exact only for one zone of the aper-
ture of a lens or for one angle of obliquity, because the aberrations of
the individual elements do not balance out exactly for all zones and
angles. Thus, while the spherical aberration of a lens may be correct-
ed to  zero  for  the rays  through the  edge of  the aperture,  the  rays
through the other zones of the aperture usually do not come to a focus
at the paraxial image point. Atypical longitudinal spherical aberration
plot for a “corrected” lens is shown in Fig. 3.19. Notice that the rays
through only one zone of the lens intersect the paraxial focus. Rays
through  the  smaller  zones  focus  nearer  the  lens  system  and  have
undercorrected spherical; rays above the corrected zone show overcor-
rected spherical. The undercorrected aberration is called residual, or
zonal, aberration; Fig. 3.19 would be said to show an undercorrected
zonal aberration. This is the usual state of affairs for most optical sys-
tems. Occasionally a system is designed with an overcorrected spheri-
cal zone, but this is unusual.
Chromatic aberration has residuals which take two different forms.
The correction of chromatic aberration is accomplished by making the
foci of two different wavelengths coincide. However, due to the nature
of  the  great majority  of  optical  materials, the  nonlinear  dispersion
characteristics of the positive and negative elements used in an achro-
mat do not “match up,” so that the focal points of other wavelengths do
Aberrations
81
Figure 3.18
Achromatic doublet
telescope objective. The powers
and shapes of the two elements
are so arranged that each can-
cels the aberrations of the other.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested