c# open pdf file in browser : Delete a page in a pdf file control software system azure windows wpf console Silent_Spring-Rachel_Carson-19620-part19

Si l e n t  
Sp r i n g  
RACHEL 
CARSON 
Author of THE SEA AROUND US 
THE 
EXPLOSIVE 
BESTSELLER 
THE WHOLE WORLD 
IS TALKING ABOUT 
Delete a page in a pdf file - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
acrobat extract pages from pdf; delete pages of pdf preview
Delete a page in a pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
acrobat remove pages from pdf; delete blank page from pdf
SILENT SPRING, winner of 8 awards*, is the history making bestseller that 
stunned the world with its terrifying revelation about our contaminated planet. No science-
fiction nightmare can equal the power of this authentic and chilling portrait of the un-seen 
destroyers which have already begun to change the shape of life as we know it. 
“Silent Spring is a devastating attack on human carelessness, greed and 
irresponsibility. It should be read by every American who does not want it to be the epitaph of 
a world not very far beyond us in time.” 
--- Saturday Review 
*Awards received by Rachel Carson for S
ILENT
S
PRING
The Schweitzer Medal (Animal Welfare Institute) 
The Constance Lindsay Skinner Achievement Award for merit in the realm of books (Women’s 
National Book Association) 
Award for Distinguished Service (New England Outdoor Writers Association) 
Conservation Award for 1962 (Rod and Gun Editors of Metropolitan Manhattan) 
Conservationist of the Year (National Wildlife Federation) 
1963 Achievement Award (Albert Einstein College of Medicine --- Women’s Division) 
Annual Founders Award (Isaak Walton League) 
Citation (International and U.S. Councils of Women) 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete page pdf file; delete page on pdf reader
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
your PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page adding a page into PDF document, deleting unnecessary page from PDF file and changing
cut pages out of pdf online; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
Silent Spring 
( By Rachel Carson ) 
“I recommend SILENT SPRING above all other books.”  --- N. J. Berrill author of MAN’S 
EMERGING MIND 
"Certain to be history-making in its influence upon thought and public policy all over the 
world." --Book-of-the-Month Club News 
"Miss Carson is a scientist and is not given to tossing serious charges around carelessly. 
When she warns us, as she does with such a profound sense of urgency, we ought to 
take heed. SILENT SPRING may well be one of the great and lowering books of our time. 
This book is must reading for every responsible citizen." --Chicago Daily 
"Miss Carson's cry of warning is timely. If our species cannot police itself against 
overpopulation, nuclear weapons and pollution, it may become extinct." --The New York 
Times 
"A great woman has awakened the Nation by her forceful account of the dangers 
around us. We owe much to Rachel Carson." --Stewart L. Udall, Secretary of the Interior 
"It is high time for people to know about these rapid changes in their environment, and 
to take an effective part in the battle that may shape the future of all life on earth." -The 
New York Times Book Review{front page} 
"It should come as no surprise that the gifted author of THE SEA AROUN US can take 
another branch of science ... and bring it so sharply into focus that any intelligent 
layman can understand what she is talking about. Understand, yes, and shudder, for she 
has drawn a living portrait of what is happening to this balance of nature as decreed in 
the science of life --- and what man is doing (and has done) to destroy it and create a 
science of death." -Virginia Kirkus Bulletin 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C#
delete pdf pages acrobat; delete page in pdf file
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Besides, in the process of splitting PDF document, developers can also remove certain PDF page from target PDF file using C#.NET PDF page deletion API.
delete pages from a pdf online; copy pages from pdf to new pdf
Silent 
Spring 
By Rachel Carson 
(ONE SINGLE BOOK WHICH BROUGHT THE ISSUE OF PESTICIDES CENTERSTAGE. WITH MASS SCALE POISONING 
OF THE LAND WITH PESTICIDES AND WITH THOUSANDS OF FARMERS COMMITTING SUICIDE THIS BOOK IS 
ESSENTIAL FOR PUBLIC RESEARCH IN INDIA.) 
A CREST REPRINT 
FAWCETT PUBLICATIONS, INC., GREENWICH, CONN. 
MEMBER OF AMERICAN BOOK PUBLISHERS COUNCIL, INC. 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Delete unimportant contents Embedded page thumbnails.
acrobat export pages from pdf; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Add and Insert a Page to PDF File Using VB. doc2.Save( outPutFilePath). Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File Using VB.
delete pdf pages in reader; delete blank page in pdf
To Albert Schweitzer 
who said 
“Man has lost the capacity to foresee 
and to forestall. He will end by  
destroying the earth.” 
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Delete unimportant contents Embedded page thumbnails.
delete a page from a pdf acrobat; delete a page from a pdf in preview
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
document file, and choose to create a new PDF file in .NET NET document imaging toolkit, also offers other advanced PDF document page processing and
delete pages from pdf in reader; delete pages from pdf document
Contents 
i.
Acknowledgments 
ii.
Foreword 
1.
A Fable for Tomorrow 
2.
The Obligation to Endure 
3.
Elixirs of Death 
4.
Surface Waters and Underground Seas 
5.
Realms of the Soil 
6.
Earth’s Green Mantle 
7.
Needless Havoc 
8.
And No Birds Sing 
9.
Rivers of Death 
10.
Indiscriminately from the Skies 
11.
Beyond the Dreams of the Borgias 
12.
The Human Price 
13.
Through a Narrow Window 
14.
One in Every Four 
15.
Nature Fights Back 
16.
The Rumblings of an Avalanche 
17.
The Other Road 
Acknowledgments 
IN A LETTER written in January 1958, Olga Owens Huckins told me of her own bitter 
experience of a small world  made lifeless, and so brought  my attention sharply back to a 
problem with which I had long been concerned. I then realized I must write this book. 
During the years since then I have received help and encouragement from so many people that 
it is not possible to name them all here. Those who have freely shared with me the fruits of 
many years’ experience and study represent a wide variety of government agencies in this and 
other countries, many universities and research institutions, and many professions. To all of 
them I express my deepest thanks for time and thought so generously given. 
In addition my special gratitude goes to those who took time to read portions of the manuscript 
and to offer comment and criticism based on their own expert knowledge. Although the final 
responsibility for the accuracy and validity of the text is mine, I could not have completed the 
book without the generous help of these specialists: L. G. Bartholomew, M.D., of the Mayo 
Clinic, John J. Biesele of the University of Texas, A. W. A. Brown of the University of Western 
Ontario, Morton S. Biskind, M.D., of Westport, Connecticut, C. J. Briejer of the Plant Protection 
Service in Holland, Clarence Cottam of the Rob and Bessie Welder Wildlife Foundation, George 
Crile,  Jr.,  M.D.,  of  the  Cleveland  Clinic,  Frank  Egler  of  Norfolk,  Connecticut,  Malcolm  M. 
Hargraves, M.D., of the Mayo Clinic, W. C. Hueper, M.D., of the National Cancer Institute, C. J. 
Kerswill of the Fisheries Research Board of Canada, Olaus Murie of the Wilderness Society, A. D. 
Pickett of the Canada Department of Agriculture, Thomas G. Scott of the Illinois Natural History 
Survey, Clarence Tarzwell of the Taft Sanitary Engineering Center, and George J. Wallace of 
Michigan State University. Every writer of a book based on many diverse facts owes much to 
the skill and helpfulness of librarians. I owe such a debt to many,  but especially to Ida K. 
Johnston of the Department of the Interior Library and to Thelma Robinson of the Library of the 
National Institutes of Health. 
As my editor, Paul Brooks has given steadfast encouragement over the years and has 
cheerfully accommodated his plans to postponements and delays. For this, and for his skilled 
editorial judgment, I am everlastingly grateful. I have had capable and devoted assistance in the 
enormous task of library research from Dorothy Algire, Jeanne Davis, and Bette Haney Duff. 
And I could not possibly have completed the task, under circumstances sometimes difficult, 
except for the faithful help of my housekeeper, Ida Sprow. 
Finally, I must acknowledge our vast indebtedness to a host of people, many of them 
unknown  to  me  personally,  who  have  nevertheless  made  the  writing  of  this  book  seem 
worthwhile. These are the people who first spoke out against the reckless and irresponsible 
poisoning of the world that man shares with all other creatures, and who are even now fighting 
the thousands of small battles that in the end will bring victory for sanity and common sense in 
our accommodation to the world that surrounds us. 
RACHEL CARSON 
Foreword 
IN 1958, when Rachel Carson undertook to write the book that became Silent Spring, 
she was fifty years old. She had spent most of her professional life as a marine biologist and 
writer with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. But now she was a world-famous author, thanks 
to the fabulous success of The Sea Around Us, published seven years before. Royalties from this 
book and its successor, The Edge of the Sea, had enabled her to devote full time to her own 
writing. To most authors this would seem like an ideal situation: an established reputation, 
freedom to choose one’s own subject, publishers more than ready to contract for anything one 
wrote. It might have been assumed that her next book would be in a field that offered the same 
opportunities, the same joy in research, as did its predecessors. Indeed she had such projects in 
mind. But it was not to be. While working for the government, she and her scientific colleagues 
had become alarmed by the widespread use of DDT and other long-lasting poisons in so-called 
agricultural control programs. Immediately after the war, when these dangers had already been 
recognized, she had tried in vain to interest some magazine in an article on the subject. A 
decade later, when the spraying of pesticides and herbicides (some of them many times as toxic 
as DDT) was causing wholesale destruction of wildlife and its habitat, and clearly endangering 
human life, she decided she had to speak out. Again she tried to interest the magazines in an 
article. Though by now she was a well-known writer, the magazine publishers, fearing to lose 
advertising, turned her down. For example, a manufacturer of canned baby food claimed that 
such an article would cause “unwarranted fear” to mothers who used his product. (The one 
exception was The New Yorker, which would later serialize parts of Silent Spring in advance of 
book publication.) So the only answer was to write a book—book publishers being free of 
advertising pressure. Miss Carson tried to find someone else to write it, but at last she decided 
that if it were to be done, she would have to do it herself. Many of her strongest admirers 
questioned whether she could write a salable book on such a dreary subject. She shared their 
doubts, but she went ahead because she had to. “There would be no peace for me,” she wrote 
to a friend, “if I kept silent.”  
Silent Spring was over four years in the making. It required a very different kind of 
research from her previous books. She could no longer recount the delights of the laboratories 
at Woods Hole or of the marine rock pools at low tide. Joy in the subject itself had to be 
replaced by a sense of almost religious dedication. And extraordinary courage: during the final 
years she was plagued with what she termed “a whole catalogue of illnesses.” 
Also she knew very well that she would be attacked by the chemical industry. It was not simply 
that she was opposing indiscriminate use of poisons but—more fundamentally—that she had 
made  clear  the  basic  irresponsibility  of  an  industrialized,  technological society  toward  the 
natural  world.  When  the  attack  did  come,  it  was  probably  as  bitter  and  unscrupulous  as 
anything of the sort since the publication of Charles Darwin’s Origin of Species a century before. 
Hundreds of thousands of dollars were spent by the chemical industry in an attempt to 
discredit the book and to malign the author—she was described as an ignorant and hysterical 
woman who wanted to turn the earth over to the insects. These attacks fortunately backfired 
by creating more publicity than the publisher possibly could have afforded. A major chemical 
company tried to stop publication on the grounds that Miss Carson had made a misstatement 
about one of their products. She hadn’t, and publication proceeded on schedule. 
She herself was singularly unmoved by all this furor.  
Meanwhile, as a direct result of the message in Silent Spring, President Kennedy set up a 
special panel of his Science Advisory Committee to study the problem of pesticides. The panel’s 
report, when it appeared some months later, was a complete vindication of her thesis. Rachel 
Carson was very modest about her accomplishment. As she wrote to a close friend when the 
manuscript was nearing completion: “The beauty of the living world I was trying to save has 
always been uppermost in my mind—that, and anger at the senseless, brutish things that were 
being done.... Now l can believe I have at least helped a little.” In fact, her book helped to make 
ecology, which was an unfamiliar word in those days, one of the great popular causes of our 
time. It led to environmental legislation at every level of government.  
Twenty-five years after its original publication, Silent Spring has more than a historical 
interest. Such a book bridges the gulf between what C. P. Snow called “the two cultures.” 
Rachel Carson was a realistic, well-trained scientist who possessed the insight and sensitivity of 
a poet. She had an emotional response to nature for which she did not apologize. The more she 
learned, the greater grew what she termed “the sense of wonder.” So she succeeded in making 
a book about  death a celebration  of life. Rereading her book today, one is aware that its 
implications are far broader than the immediate crisis with which it dealt. By awaking us to a 
specific danger—the poisoning of the earth with chemicals—she has helped us to recognize 
many other ways (some little known in her time) in which mankind is degrading the quality of 
life on our planet.  
And  Silent  Spring  will  continue  to  remind  us  that  in  our  over-organized  and  over-
mechanized age, individual initiative and courage still count: change can be brought about, not 
through incitement to war or violent revolution, but rather by altering the direction of our 
thinking about the world we live in. 
1. A Fable for Tomorrow 
THERE WAS ONCE a town in the heart of America where all life seemed to live in 
harmony with its surroundings. The town lay in the midst of a checkerboard of prosperous 
farms, with fields of grain and hillsides of orchards where, in spring, white clouds of bloom 
drifted above the green fields. In autumn, oak and maple and birch set up a blaze of color that 
flamed and flickered across a backdrop of pines. Then foxes barked in the hills and deer silently 
crossed the fields, half hidden in the mists of the fall mornings. 
Along the roads, laurel, viburnum and alder, great ferns and wildflowers delighted the traveler’s 
eye through much of the year. Even in winter the roadsides were places of beauty, where 
countless birds came to feed on the berries and on the seed heads of the dried weeds rising 
above the snow. The countryside was, in fact, famous for the abundance and variety of its bird 
life, and when the flood of migrants was pouring through in spring and fall people traveled from 
great distances to observe them. Others came to fish the streams, which flowed clear and cold 
out of the hills and contained shady pools where trout lay. So it had been from the days many 
years ago when the first settlers raised their houses, sank their wells, and built their barns. 
Then a strange blight crept over the area and everything began to change. Some evil spell had 
settled on the community: mysterious maladies swept the flocks of chickens; the cattle and 
sheep sickened and died. Everywhere was a shadow of death. The farmers spoke of much 
illness among their families. In the town the doctors had become more and more puzzled by 
new kinds of sickness appearing among their patients. There had been several sudden and 
unexplained deaths, not only among adults but even among children, who would be stricken 
suddenly while at play and die within a few hours. 
There was a strange stillness. The birds, for example—where had they gone? Many people 
spoke of them, puzzled and disturbed. The feeding stations in the backyards were deserted. The 
few birds seen anywhere were moribund; they trembled violently and could not fly. It was a 
spring without voices. On the mornings that had once throbbed with the dawn chorus of robins, 
catbirds, doves, jays, wrens, and scores of other bird voices there was now no sound; only 
silence lay over the fields and woods and marsh. 
On the farms the hens brooded, but no chicks hatched. The farmers complained that they were 
unable to raise any pigs—the litters were small and the young survived only a few days. The 
apple trees were coming into bloom but no bees droned among the blossoms, so there was no 
pollination and there would be no fruit. The roadsides, once so attractive, were now lined with 
browned and withered vegetation as though swept by fire. These, too, were silent, deserted by 
all living things. Even the streams were now lifeless. Anglers no longer visited them, for all the 
fish had died. 
In the gutters under the eaves and between the shingles of the roofs, a white granular powder 
still showed a few patches; some weeks before it had fallen like snow upon the roofs and the 
lawns, the fields and streams. No witchcraft, no enemy action had silenced the rebirth of new 
life in this stricken world. The people had done it themselves. 
. . .This town does not actually exist, but it might easily have a thousand counterparts in 
America or elsewhere in the world. I know of no community that  has experienced all the 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested