c# pdf reader control : Delete page pdf online application control utility azure html windows visual studio typesetting0-part1922

Typesetting in Microsoft Word 
By Jack M. Lyon 
Part 1: Getting Started 
If you’re a small publisher, you may have wondered if it’s possible to set 
type in Microsoft Word. Why would you want to? Well, you probably already 
understand how to use Word, at least to some extent. You probably do your 
editorial work in Word. And converting Word files into QuarkXPress or InDesign 
can be problematic. Besides, you may not be able to afford these expensive 
typesetting programs. An additional bonus: Word does automatic footnotes. 
Yes, it would be great if you could do professional-quality typesetting in 
nothing but Word. The truth is, you can, if you know how. And in this article, I 
hope to teach you most of what you’ll need. 
Setting Up Microsoft Word 
One of the keys in using Word for typography is to change a few of its 
little-known options. Most important is the option to make word spacing in 
justified text contract as well as expand. This will greatly improve the look of 
your type. To use it: 
1. 
Click the “Tools” menu. On a Macintosh, click “Edit.” 
2. 
Click “Options.” On a Macintosh, click “Preferences.” 
3. 
Click the “Compatibility” tab. 
4. 
Put a check next to the option labeled “Do full justification like 
WordPerfect 6.x for Windows.” 
The resulting type may not always justify correctly on a Macintosh, so be 
careful. 
While you’re looking at the “Compatibility” tab, put a check next to 
“Don’t expand character spaces on the line ending Shift-Return.” Then if you 
break a line with a soft return (SHIFT + ENTER), the line will still be properly 
justified. 
I also recommend using the following options: 
• 
Don’t center “exact line height” lines. 
• 
Don’t add extra space for raised/lowered characters. 
• 
Suppress “Space Before” after a hard page or column break. 
Delete page pdf online - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page from pdf file; delete pages pdf
Delete page pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages of pdf; delete pages in pdf reader
When you’re finished, click OK. 
Finally, turn on automatic hyphenation in the document you want to 
typeset: 
1. 
Click Tools > Language > Hyphenation. 
2. 
Check the box labeled “Automatically hyphenate document.” 
3. 
Set “Hyphenation zone” to about half an inch or the equivalent. 
4. 
Set “Limit consecutive hyphens” to 3. 
5. 
Click the OK button. 
Even after you’ve set these options, justification may not look quite right 
on your screen, especially at the ends of lines, since Word doesn’t render 
everything perfectly. When you print your document, however, you’ll see the 
justified text in all its glory. 
Finding a Design 
A lot of books from small publishers have a common weakness—poor 
design. I’m not talking about the cover, mind you (a topic for another day). 
I’m talking about the design of the internal pages and typography. 
Fortunately, bad design is a fairly easy problem to overcome. How? Steal 
a good design. There is no copyright on a book’s typography—only on its text. 
So you might as well borrow the design of the best-looking books you can find. 
First, identify the typefaces used in the book: 
http://www.identifont.com/ 
Next, identify point sizes of headings, body text, and other elements. 
You’ll also need to identify leading (line spacing) and line length. How? Get out 
the old pica ruler and start measuring. You don’t have a pica ruler? You can 
get one at your local art-supply store—or download a couple of free ones here: 
http://www.microtype.com/resourcesMisc.html 
http://www.tramontana.co.hu/ventura/szkript/ty
poruler.html 
If you want to measure stuff on-screen, you’ll love the free CoolRuler, 
which you can download here and configure to meet your needs: 
http://www.fabsoft.com/products/ruler/ruler.htm
Many books use more than one typeface—usually a serif face for body 
text and a sans-serif or decorative face for display text, such as headings. But 
professional designers won’t use much more than that, and neither should 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Provides you with examples for adding an (empty) page to a PDF and adding empty pages You may feel free to define some continuous PDF pages and delete.
delete a page from a pdf file; copy pages from pdf into new pdf
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
delete pages pdf file; delete page from pdf online
you. Using lots of different typefaces in a single book is a hallmark of bad 
design. You should also avoid using Arial (Helvetica on a Mac) for heading 
styles and Times New Roman (Times on a Mac) for body text. They’re Word’s 
defaults, which means they’re vastly overused. Also, Times Roman was 
designed for use in a newspaper (specifically the London Times), and its 
characters are really too narrow for a book. 
If you’d like suggestions for typefaces that look good together, you’ll find 
lots of information here: 
http://www.will-harris.com/typepairs.htm 
http://www.stc.org/confproceed/2002/PDFs/STC
49–00068.pdf 
Next time: Setting up pages. 
© 2005 by The Editorium. All rights reserved. 
Jack M. Lyon is proprietor of The Editorium: 
http://www.editorium.com 
The Editorium provides macros to automate publishing tasks in Microsoft 
Word, including Editor’s ToolKit Plus, FileCleaner, NoteStripper, MegaReplacer, 
and DEXter (an indexing add-in). To subscribe to Editorium Update, a free 
newsletter about publishing with Word, send a blank email message to: 
mailto:subscribe-editorium@topica.com 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+. PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C#
delete pdf pages acrobat; delete page pdf
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
delete page in pdf; add or remove pages from pdf
Typesetting in Microsoft Word 
By Jack M. Lyon 
Part 2: Setting Up Pages 
In our last episode, you set up Microsoft Word for typesetting and 
figured out your design. Now it’s time to set up your pages based on that 
design. For most books, you’ll need three different layouts: 
1. 
The first page of a chapter. 
2. 
A left (verso) page. 
3. 
A right (recto) page. 
Dedicated typesetting programs set these up with “master pages.” Word 
lacks such a feature but still makes it possible to set up different kinds of 
pages: 
1. 
Click File > Page Setup. On a Macintosh, click the “Margins” 
button. 
2. 
Click the Layout tab. Notice that the preview shows only one page. 
3. 
Under “Section start,” select “Odd page” if you want every chapter 
to start on the traditional odd page, or “New page” if you want to let the 
chapters fall where they may. 
4. 
Under “Headers and footers,” put a check in the boxes labeled 
“Different odd and even” and “Different first page.” The preview now shows 
two pages. Hey, this is starting to look like a page layout! 
5. 
Go back to the Margins tab. 
6. 
Notice that you can set margin size for top and bottom, left and 
right. In Word 2002 or later, under “Pages,” select “Mirror margins” from the 
dropdown list. In Word 97, 98, 2000, or 2001, put a check in the box labeled 
“Mirror margins.” Notice that “Left” and “Right” have become “Inside” and 
“Outside.” 
7. 
Set the margins. Let’s say body text is 10/12—10-point type with 
12-point leading (line spacing) (Formatting > Paragraph > Indents and 
Spacing > Line spacing: Exactly). 
Let’s also say a standard page has 35 lines. That means you should 
calculate top and bottom margins to create a text block of 420 points (12 x 
35). 
With 8.5 by 11 paper (U.S. standard), calculate 11 inches times 72 
points (72 points = 1 inch) equals 792 points, minus 420 points equals 372 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET source code. Support .NET WinForms, ASP
delete pages from pdf file online; delete pages pdf
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
delete pages of pdf preview; delete pages of pdf reader
points, divided by 2 (you have both a top and a bottom margin) equals 186 
points. So set top margin to 186 points and bottom margin to 186 points (to 
center the block on the page). 
If you’re mathematically inclined, this equates to ((11 x 72)–(35 x 
12))/2. So here’s the formula, which you should be able to apply in any 
situation: 
Margin = ((Paper length in units x Points per 
unit)—(Lines x Leading point size))/2 
8. 
After setting margins, click the OK button to put your decisions 
into effect. 
When you set margins and line spacing in this way, page bottoms and 
lines of type will align, giving pages a professional look. “But what about 
headings?” you ask. “And block quotations? Won’t they throw things off?” 
Yes, they will. One way to solve the problem is to make sure headings, 
block quotations, and other elements have the same leading as body text—or 
multiples of that leading. As Robert Bringhurst, in his book The Elements of 
Typographic Style (p. 38), explains: 
If the main text runs 11/13, intrusions to the 
text should equal some multiple of 13 points: 26, 39, 
52, . . . and so on. . . . If you happen to be setting a 
text 11/13, subhead possibilities include the following: 
• 
subheads in 11/13 small caps, with 13 pt 
above the head and 13 pt below; 
• 
subheads in 11/13 bold u&lc (upper and 
lower case), with 8 pt above the head and 5 pt below, 
since 8 + 5 = 13; 
• 
one-line subheads in 14/13 italic u&lc, with 
16 pt above the head and 10 pt below.” 
If you don’t want to deal with math, there is another way. If you were 
setting metal type, you could insert thin strips of lead (hence the term 
“leading” for line spacing) between lines to align page bottoms that have been 
thrown off by subheadings and block quotations. 
You can do the same thing in Word by inserting carriage returns, 
formatted with a point size of 1, as many times as needed to force the type to 
the bottom of the page. Put them before and after block quotations and even 
between paragraphs if you have to, trying to be as unobtrusive as possible. 
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Ability to insert a text note after selected text. Allow users to draw freehand shapes on PDF page. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online.
pdf delete page; delete pages from pdf online
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Delete and remove all image objects contained in a specific to remove a specific image from PDF document page. Free .NET PDF SDK library download and online C#
cut pages out of pdf; delete pages from a pdf in preview
Creating Headers and Footers 
Your pages aren’t finished until you’ve set up headers and footers, which 
help readers keep track of where they are. To set them up: 
1. 
Click View > Header and Footer. You’ll find your cursor in the 
Header pane, with a toolbar that lets you do various things. To see what a 
button does, point at it with your mouse and let the pointer sit a few seconds 
until the explanatory ToolTip appears. 
2. 
Skip the header of your first page (labeled “First Page Header”), 
which will be the opening page of your chapter and thus doesn’t need a 
running head. To do so, click the button to Switch between Header and Footer. 
3. 
You’re now in the footer (labeled “First Page Footer”) of your 
chapter’s opening page. Insert a page number by clicking the Insert Page 
Number button. (If this is front matter, you can click the Format Page Number 
button and set your numbering to use Roman numerals.) 
4. 
Decide whether you want the page number on the left, center, or 
right of your page and make it so. Just click Format > Paragraph > Alignment 
and pick your pleasure. 
5. 
Move to the next page by clicking the Show Next button. This will 
take you to the next page’s footer (labeled “Even Page Footer”). Since you 
previously set up your document to have different first, left, and right pages, 
you’ll need to insert another page number here; numbering won’t just 
continue from the first page. Again, format the number as left, center, or 
right. Since this is an even (and therefore left, or verso) page, you may want 
to put the page number on the left. 
6. 
Repeat step 5 for the footer on the next page, which will be a 
right-hand (recto) page. You may want to put the page number on the right. 
7. 
Move to the previous page’s header (verso; labeled “Even Page 
Header”) by clicking the Show Previous button and then the button to Switch 
between Header and Footer. Type the text of your header into the Header 
pane. In book publishing, items that are more inclusive go on the left; items 
that are less inclusive go on the right. A few options: 
LEFT 
RIGHT 
Author Name 
Chapter Title 
Book Title 
Part Title 
Part Title 
Chapter Title 
8. 
Again, the easiest way to put the running head on the left, center, 
or right of the page is to click Format > Paragraph > Alignment. Since this is 
an even page, you may want to put the running head on the left. 
9. 
Move to the next page’s header (recto) by clicking the Show Next 
button. Type the text of your header into the Header pane. Since this is an odd 
page, you may want to put the running head on the right. 
10.  Set the font and point size for your running heads and page 
numbers by modifying their styles under Format > Style. You want them to 
match the rest of your text, right? While you’re in there, make sure they’re not 
set up with an automatic first-line paragraph indent. 
11.  Adjust the space between headers, text blocks, and footers by 
clicking the Page Setup button and the Margins tab. Then set the distance 
“From edge” (of the paper) of the header and footer. This may take some 
experimentation to get right, but when you’re finished, your pages should look 
pretty good. 
12.  Click the Close button to get back to your document text. 
To see your handiwork, click View > Print Layout and set View > Zoom 
to Whole Page. Wow! Note that your folios (page numbers) and running heads 
are automatically repeated on successive pages.) 
You’ll need to repeat this whole procedure for each succeeding chapter, 
and if all of your chapters are in one document, you’ll need to separate them 
with section breaks (Insert > Break > Next Page). 
After inserting a section break, always turn off “Link to previous” for 
both header and footer (View > Header and footer > Link to previous [fourth 
icon from the left]). To move from header to footer, click the “Switch between 
header and footer” button (third icon from the left). Again, turn off “Link to 
previous.” That means you’ll need to insert folios and running heads 
separately for each section. It’s a pain, but it’s the only way to make sure 
Word does exactly what you want it to. 
Next time: Setting type. 
© 2005 by The Editorium. All rights reserved. 
Jack M. Lyon is proprietor of The Editorium: 
http://www.editorium.com 
The Editorium provides macros to automate publishing tasks in Microsoft 
Word, including Editor’s ToolKit Plus, FileCleaner, NoteStripper, MegaReplacer, 
and DEXter (an indexing add-in). To subscribe to Editorium Update, a free 
newsletter about publishing with Word, send a blank email message to: 
mailto:subscribe-editorium@topica.com 
Typesetting in Microsoft Word 
By Jack M. Lyon 
Part 3: Setting Type 
It’s midnight, and all the cubicles are dark except one in the back 
corner, where you’re struggling to standardize the formatting of all the 
subheadings in your document. You select one with your mouse, click Format 
> Font, and select Arial, bold, and 14 point. Then you click the Character 
Spacing tab and set spacing to be condensed by one point. Finally, you click 
Format > Paragraph and set alignment as centered. And then you realize: 
You’ve done only 100 pages of this 500-page book. Isn’t there a better way? 
Yes, there is, and that way is called styles. Using styles is easy. Instead 
of selecting every subheading and going through all those steps, all you have 
to do is this: 
1. 
Put your cursor somewhere in the text you want to format—in a 
subheading, for example. 
2. 
Click Format > Styles and Formatting. 
3. 
In the list on the right, find a style that fits what you need. For 
example, Heading 3 is great for formatting subheadings because it leaves 
Heading 1 for part headings and Heading 2 for chapter headings. 
4. 
Click the style you want to use. 
The paragraph where your cursor was resting will be formatted 
automatically with the style. 
Now repeat steps 1 and 4 for all your subheadings. Click a subheading, 
click a style. Click a subheading, click a style. Isn’t that easier than selecting 
each subhead and drilling through half a dozen dialog boxes? 
But there is a potential problem: What if you don’t like the formatting in 
that style? What if you want Baskerville instead of Arial? Just do this: 
1. 
Point your mouse at the right side of the style in the list on the 
right. A dropdown arrow will appear. 
2. 
Click the arrow and click Modify. 
3. 
Under Formatting, set the font as Baskerville. 
4. 
Click OK. 
Your subheading will now be formatted in Baskerville. In fact, all the 
subheadings to which you’ve applied Heading 3 will be in Baskerville—and you 
only had to make the change once rather than selecting and changing each 
subheading. Magic! 
You’ll want to format all your text elements in a similar way. Body text is 
styled by default as Normal, and you’ll probably want to modify the Normal 
style to use justified paragraph formatting. 
Once you’ve formatted the styles you want to use, you should save your 
document as a template so you can use it with other books in the future. 
Here’s why: 
Just as styles have this relationship to paragraphs— 
Styles  Paragraphs 
—so do templates have a similar relationship to styles: 
Templates  Styles 
And just as you can modify a paragraph’s formatting by applying a style, 
so can you modify all of a document’s styles by applying a template: 
1. 
Format your document using Word’s built-in styles, such as 
Heading 3. Don’t worry if the formatting doesn’t look the way you want. All 
that is about to change. 
2. 
Click Format > Theme. 
3. 
Click the Style Gallery button. 
4. 
In the Template list, select a template that looks interesting. You’ll 
see a preview of how your document will look if you use that template. Select 
a few other templates and watch the preview change. 
5. 
If you find a template you like, click OK to copy the style 
formatting from the template into your document. This will automatically 
format all your styled text to match the formatting used in the template. Note 
that the style names used in your document must match the style names used 
in the template, which is why I suggested using Word’s built-in styles. 
Don’t like any of the templates? You may be able to find just what you 
need from Microsoft: 
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/templates/default.aspx 
Or, you can make your own: 
1. 
Format your document with styles, using the typeface and other 
settings you want. 
2. 
Save your document as a template (File > Save As > Template). 
From then on, that template will be available to apply to other 
documents—very handy if you have a series of books you want formatted in 
the same way. 
Using Typographic Characters 
Sometimes its the small things that make a big difference in good 
typography—things like typographical dashes and quotation marks. The 
dashes include the en dash (used between numbers, as in “pages 2–4”) and 
the em dash, used to signal a break in thought—like that. On a typewriter, em 
dashes were set with double hyphens (--). 
If your numbers are separated by hyphens rather than en dashes, you 
can fix the problem like this: 
1. 
Click Edit > Replace. 
2. 
In the Find What box, enter this: 
([0–9])-([0–9]) 
3. 
In the Replace With box, enter this: 
\1^=\2 
4. 
Click the More button. 
5. 
Put a check in the checkbox labeled “Use wildcards.” 
6. 
Click the Replace All button. 
All of your hyphens between numbers will be turned into en dashes. 
If you’d like to learn more about wildcard searching (very useful!), 
download this paper: 
http://www.editorium.com/ftp/advancedfind.zip 
Now let’s look at those quotation marks. Back in the days of typewriters, 
there was only one choice—straight quotation marks, which looked "like this." 
Typeset text, however, should use curly quotation marks, “like this.” You can 
fix them, along with double hyphens used for em dashes, like this: 
1. 
Click Format > AutoFormat. 
2. 
Click the Options button. 
3. 
On the AutoFormat tab, uncheck everything except these two 
options: 
• 
"Straight quotes" with “smart quotes” 
• 
Hyphens (--) with dash (—) 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested