c# pdf reader control : Delete page on pdf document software application cloud windows html asp.net class UCM2633660-part1952

Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
Mobile Medical Applications 
__________________________ 
Guidance for Industry and Food 
and Drug Administration Staff 
Document issued on February 9, 2015. 
This document supersedes “Mobile Medical Applications: Guidance for 
Food and Drug Administration Staff” issued on September 25, 2013.
This document was updated to be consistent with the guidance document 
“Medical Devices Data Systems, Medical Image Storage Devices, and Medical 
Image Communications Devices” issued on February 9, 2015.   
For questions about this document regarding CDRH-regulated devices, contact Bakul Patel at 
301-796-5528 or by electronic mail at Bakul.Patel@fda.hhs.gov or contact the Office of the 
- 1 - 
Center Director at 301-796-5900.  
For questions about this document regarding CBER-regulated devices, contact the Office of 
Communication, Outreach and Development (OCOD), by calling 1-800-835-4709 or 240-402-
7800. 
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 
Food and Drug Administration 
Center for Devices and Radiological Health 
Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research 
Delete page on pdf document - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pdf pages reader; delete pdf pages
Delete page on pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
acrobat remove pages from pdf; delete pages pdf document
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
Preface 
Public Comment 
You may submit written comments and suggestions at any time for Agency consideration to 
http://www.regulations.gov.  Submit written comments to the Division of Dockets Management, 
- 2 - 
Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, Room 1061, (HFA-305), Rockville, MD, 
20852.  Identify all comments with the docket number FDA-2011-D-0530.  Comments may not 
be acted upon by the Agency until the document is next revised or updated.
Additional Copies 
CDRH 
Additional copies are available from the Internet. You may also send an e-mail request to 
CDRH-Guidance@fda.hhs.gov to receive a copy of the guidance. Please use the document 
number (1741) to identify the guidance you are requesting.  
CBER 
Additional copies are available from the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) 
by written request, Office of Communication, Outreach and Development (OCOD), 10903 New 
Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 71, Room 3128, Silver Spring, MD 20903, or by calling 1-800-835-4709 
or 240-402-7800, by e-mail, ocod@fda.hhs.gov, or from the Internet at 
http://www.fda.gov/BiologicsBloodVaccines/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/ 
Guidances/default.htm
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
add and delete pages from pdf; delete page in pdf preview
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing
delete page from pdf online; cut pages from pdf online
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
Table of Contents 
I.
INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................ 4
II.
BACKGROUND ............................................................................................................................................... 6
III.
DEFINITIONS .................................................................................................................................................. 7
A.
M
OBILE 
P
LATFORM
.......................................................................................................................................... 7
B.
M
OBILE 
A
PPLICATION 
(M
OBILE 
A
PP
) .............................................................................................................. 7
C.
M
OBILE 
M
EDICAL 
A
PPLICATION 
(M
OBILE 
M
EDICAL 
A
PP
) .............................................................................. 7
D.
R
EGULATED 
M
EDICAL 
D
EVICE
........................................................................................................................ 9
E.
M
OBILE 
M
EDICAL 
A
PP 
M
ANUFACTURER
......................................................................................................... 9
IV.
SCOPE ............................................................................................................................................................. 12
V.
REGULATORY APPROACH FOR MOBILE MEDICAL APPS ............................................................. 13
A.
M
OBILE MEDICAL APPS
:
S
UBSET OF MOBILE APPS THAT ARE THE FOCUS OF 
FDA’
S REGULATORY 
OVERSIGHT
..................................................................................................................................................... 13
B.
M
OBILE 
A
PPS FOR WHICH 
FDA
INTENDS TO EXERCISE ENFORCEMENT DISCRETION 
(
MEANING THAT 
FDA
DOES NOT INTEND TO ENFORCE REQUIREMENTS UNDER THE 
FD&C
A
CT
) ............................................. 15
VI.
REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS ............................................................................................................ 19
APPENDIX A
EXAMPLES OF MOBILE APPS THAT ARE NOT MEDICAL DEVICES ........................ 20
APPENDIX B
EXAMPLES OF MOBILE APPS FOR WHICH FDA INTENDS TO EXERCISE 
ENFORCEMENT DISCRETION ................................................................................................................. 23
APPENDIX C
EXAMPLES OF MOBILE APPS THAT ARE THE FOCUS OF FDA’S 
REGULATORY OVERSIGHT (MOBILE MEDICAL APPS) .................................................................. 27
APPENDIX D
EXAMPLES OF CURRENT REGULATIONS ....................................................................... 30
APPENDIX E
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF CERTAIN DEVICE REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS .... 33
APPENDIX F
FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQS) ...................................................................... 38
APPENDIX G
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES ................................................................................................... 43
- 3 - 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class.
cut pages from pdf; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
document. If you find certain page in your PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page directly. Moreover, when
delete pages pdf online; delete page from pdf acrobat
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
Mobile Medical Applications 
Guidance for Industry and 
Food and Drug Administration Staff 
This guidance represents the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) current thinking on 
- 4 - 
this topic.  It does not create or confer any rights for or on any person and does not operate to 
bind FDA or the public.  You can use an alternative approach if the approach satisfies the 
requirements of the applicable statutes and regulations.  If you want to discuss an alternative 
approach, contact the FDA staff responsible for implementing this guidance.  If you cannot 
identify the appropriate FDA staff, call the appropriate number listed on the title page of this 
guidance.  
I.  Introduction 
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recognizes the extensive variety of actual and 
potential functions of mobile apps, the rapid pace of innovation in mobile apps, and the potential 
benefits and risks to public health represented by these apps.  The FDA is issuing this guidance 
document to inform manufacturers, distributors, and other entities about how the FDA intends to 
apply its regulatory authorities to select software applications intended for use on mobile 
platforms (mobile applications or “mobile apps”). Given the rapid expansion and broad 
applicability of mobile apps, the FDA is issuing this guidance document to clarify the subset of 
mobile apps to which the FDA intends to apply its authority. 
Many mobile apps are not medical devices (meaning such mobile apps do not meet the definition 
of a device under section 201(h) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act)), and 
FDA does not regulate them.  Some mobile apps may meet the definition of a medical device but 
because they pose a lower risk to the public, FDA intends to exercise enforcement discretion 
over these devices (meaning it will not enforce requirements under the FD&C Act).  The 
majority of mobile apps on the market at this time fit into these two categories. 
Consistent with the FDA’s existing oversight approach that considers functionality rather than 
platform, the FDA intends to apply its regulatory oversight to only those mobile apps that are 
medical devices and whose functionality could pose a risk to a patient’s safety if the mobile app 
were to not function as intended.  This subset of mobile apps the FDA refers to as mobile 
medical apps. 
FDA is issuing this guidance to provide clarity and predictability for manufacturers of mobile 
medical apps.  This document has been updated to be consistent with the guidance document 
entitled “Medical Device Data Systems, Medical Image Storage Devices, and Medical Image 
Communications Devices” issued on February 9, 2015. 
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Dim filepath As String = "" Dim outPutFilePath As String = "" Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(filepath) ' Copy the first page of PDF document.
delete a page from a pdf reader; delete pages of pdf online
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
String filepath = @""; String outPutFilePath = @""; PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(filepath); // Copy the first page of PDF document.
delete pages from a pdf; cut pages from pdf file
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
http://www.fda.gov/downloads/MedicalDevices/DeviceRegulationandGuidance/GuidanceDocu
- 5 - 
ments/UCM401996.pdf.  Examples on the Mobile Medical Apps Web site 
http://www.fda.gov/medicaldevices/productsandmedicalprocedures/connectedhealth/mobilemedi
calapplications/default.htm which were added after September 25, 2013, were incorporated into 
the appropriate appendices of this document for consistency.  
FDA's guidance documents, including this guidance, do not establish legally enforceable 
responsibilities.  Instead, guidances describe the Agency's current thinking on a topic and should 
be viewed only as recommendations, unless specific regulatory or statutory requirements are 
cited. The use of the word should in Agency guidances means that something is suggested or 
recommended, but not required. 
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
C#.NET PDF SDK - Edit PDF Document Metadata in C#.NET. Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project.
delete blank pages in pdf files; delete blank page in pdf online
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
187.0F) Dim aChar As PDFTextCharacter = textMgr.SelectChar(page, cursor) ' delete a selected As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" doc.Save
delete pages from a pdf document; acrobat export pages from pdf
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
II.  Background 
As mobile platforms become more user friendly, computationally powerful, and readily 
available, innovators have begun to develop mobile apps of increasing complexity to leverage 
the portability mobile platforms can offer.  Some of these new mobile apps are specifically 
targeted to assisting individuals in their own health and wellness management.  Other mobile 
apps are targeted to healthcare providers as tools to improve and facilitate the delivery of patient 
care.   
In 1989, FDA prepared a general policy statement on how it planned to determine whether a 
computer-based product and/or software-based product is a device, and, if so, how the FDA 
intended to regulate it.  The document, “FDA Policy for the Regulation of Computer Products,” 
became known as the “Draft Software Policy.”  After 1989, however, the use of computer and 
software products as medical devices grew exponentially and the types of products diversified 
and grew more complex (and that trend has continued).  As a result, the FDA determined that the 
draft policy did not adequately address all of the issues related to the regulation of all medical 
devices containing software.  Therefore, in 2005, the Draft Software Policy was withdrawn.
- 6 - 
1
Although the FDA has not issued an overarching software policy, the Agency has formally 
classified certain types of software applications that meet the definition of a device and, through 
classification, identified specific regulatory requirements that apply to these devices and their 
manufacturers.  These software devices include products that feature one or more software 
components, parts, or accessories (such as electrocardiographic (ECG) systems used to monitor 
cardiac rhythms), as well as devices that are composed solely of software (such as laboratory 
information management systems).  On February 15, 2011, the FDA issued a regulation down-
classifying certain computer- or software-based devices intended to be used for the electronic 
transfer, storage, display, and/or format conversion of medical device data – called Medical 
Device Data Systems (MDDSs) – from Class III (high-risk) to Class I (low-risk).
2
The FDA has previously clarified that when stand-alone software is used to analyze medical 
device data, it has traditionally been regulated as an accessory to a medical device
3
or as medical 
device software. 
As is the case with traditional medical devices, certain mobile medical apps can pose potential 
risks to public health.  Moreover, certain mobile medical apps may pose risks that are unique to 
the characteristics of the platform on which the mobile medical app is run. For example, the 
1
Annual Comprehensive List of Guidance Documents at the Food and Drug Administration (70 FR 824 at 890) 
(January 5, 2005).
2
Medical Devices; Medical Device Data Systems Final Rule (76 FR 8637) (Feb. 15, 2011). 
3
See, for example, Content of a 510(k) -- 
http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/DeviceRegulationandGuidance/HowtoMarketYourDevice/PremarketSubmissio
ns/PremarketNotification510k/ucm142651.htm (“Accessories to classified devices take on the same classification as 
the "parent" device. An accessory such as software that accepts input from multiple devices usually takes on the 
classification of the "parent" device with the highest risk, i.e., class.”); See also final Rule, Medical Devices, 
Medical Device Data Systems, 76 FR 8637 at 8643-8644 – comment 16 and FDA’s response (Feb. 15, 2011). 
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
interpretation of radiological images on a mobile device could be adversely affected by the 
smaller screen size, lower contrast ratio, and uncontrolled ambient light of the mobile platform. 
FDA intends to take these risks into account in assessing the appropriate regulatory oversight for 
these products.   
This guidance clarifies and outlines the FDA’s current thinking.  The Agency will continue to 
evaluate the potential impact these technologies might have on improving health care, reducing 
potential medical mistakes, and protecting patients. 
III.  Definitions  
A.  Mobile Platform 
For purposes of this guidance, “mobile platforms” are defined as commercial off-the-shelf 
(COTS) computing platforms, with or without wireless connectivity, that are handheld in nature. 
Examples of these mobile platforms include mobile computers such as smart phones, tablet 
computers, or other portable computers.   
B.  Mobile Application (Mobile App) 
For purposes of this guidance, a mobile application or “mobile app” is defined as a software 
application that can be executed (run) on a mobile platform (i.e., a handheld commercial off-the-
shelf computing platform, with or without wireless connectivity), or a web-based software 
application that is tailored to a mobile platform but is executed on a server. 
C.  Mobile Medical Application (Mobile Medical App) 
For purposes of this guidance, a “mobile medical app” is a mobile app that meets the definition 
of device in section 201(h) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act)
- 7 - 
4
; and 
either is intended:  
·  to be used as an accessory to a regulated medical device; or 
·  to transform a mobile platform into a regulated medical device. 
4
Products that are built with or consist of computer and/or software components or applications are subject to 
regulation as devices when they meet the definition of a device in section 201(h) of the FD&C Act.  That provision 
defines a device as “…an instrument, apparatus, implement, machine, contrivance, implant, in vitro reagent, or other 
similar or related article, including any component, part, or accessory”, that is “… intended for use in the diagnosis 
of disease or other conditions, or in the cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of disease, in man …” or “… 
intended to affect the structure or any function of the body of man or other animals ….”   Thus, software 
applications that run on a desktop computer, laptop computer, remotely on a website or “cloud,” or on a handheld 
computer may be subject to device regulation if they are intended for use in the diagnosis or the cure, mitigation, 
treatment, or prevention of disease, or to affect the structure or any function of the body of man.  The level of 
regulatory control necessary to assure safety and effectiveness varies based upon the risk the device presents to 
public health. (See Appendix D for examples). 
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
The intended use of a mobile app determines whether it meets the definition of a “device.”  As 
stated in 21 CFR 801.4,
- 8 - 
5
intended use may be shown by labeling
6
claims, advertising materials, 
or oral or written statements by manufacturers or their representatives. When the intended use of 
a mobile app is for the diagnosis of disease or other conditions, or the cure, mitigation, treatment, 
or prevention of disease, or is intended to affect the structure or any function of the body of man, 
the mobile app is a device. 
One example is a mobile app that makes a light emitting diode (LED) operate. If the 
manufacturer intends the system to illuminate objects generally (i.e., without a specific medical 
device intended use), the mobile app would not be considered a medical device. If, however, 
through marketing, labeling, and the circumstances surrounding the distribution, the mobile app 
is promoted by the manufacturer for use as a light source for doctors to examine patients, then 
the intended use of the light source would be similar to a conventional device such as an 
ophthalmoscope.  
In general, if a mobile app is intended for use in performing a medical device function (i.e. for 
diagnosis of disease or other conditions, or the cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of 
disease) it is a medical device, regardless of the platform on which it is run.  For example, 
mobile apps intended to run on smart phones to analyze and interpret EKG waveforms to detect 
heart function irregularities would be considered similar to software running on a desktop 
computer that serves the same function, which is regulated under 21 CFR 870.2340 
(“Electrocardiograph”).   FDA’s oversight approach to mobile apps is focused on their 
functionality, just as we focus on the functionality of conventional devices.  Our oversight is not 
determined by the platform. Under this guidance, FDA would not regulate the sale or 
general/conventional consumer use of smartphones or tablets. FDA’s oversight applies to mobile 
apps performing medical device functions, such as when a mobile medical app transforms a 
mobile platform into a medical device.  However, as previously noted, we intend to apply this 
oversight authority only to those mobile apps whose functionality could pose a risk to a patient’s 
safety if the mobile app were to not function as intended.   
5
“The words ‘intended uses’ or words of similar import … refer to the objective intent of the persons legally 
responsible for the labeling of devices. The intent is determined by such persons' expressions or may be shown by 
the circumstances surrounding the distribution of the article. This objective intent may, for example, be shown by 
labeling claims, advertising matter, or oral or written statements by such persons or their representatives. It may be 
shown by the circumstances that the article is, with the knowledge of such persons or their representatives, offered 
and used for a purpose for which it is neither labeled nor advertised. The intended uses of an article may change 
after it has been introduced into interstate commerce by its manufacturer. If, for example, a packer, distributor, or 
seller intends an article for different uses than those intended by the person from whom he received the devices, 
such packer, distributor, or seller is required to supply adequate labeling in accordance with the new intended uses. 
But if a manufacturer knows, or has knowledge of facts that would give him notice that a device introduced into 
interstate commerce by him is to be used for conditions, purposes, or uses other than the ones for which he offers it, 
he is required to provide adequate labeling for such a device which accords with such other uses to which the article 
is to be put.” 21 CFR 801.4. 
6
“The term ‘labeling’ means all labels and other written, printed, or graphic matter (1) upon any article or any of its 
containers or wrappers, or (2) accompanying such article.” Section 201(m) of the FD&C Act, 21 U.S.C. 321(m). 
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
D.  Regulated Medical Device 
For purposes of this guidance, a “regulated medical device” is defined as a product that meets the 
definition of device in section 201(h) of the FD&C Act and that has been cleared or approved by 
the FDA review of a premarket submission or otherwise classified by the FDA.  
This definition can include novel devices, whether or not on a mobile platform, that the FDA will 
clear or approve by the review of a premarket submission or otherwise classify.  Examples of 
regulated medical devices are identified in Appendix D. 
E.  Mobile Medical App Manufacturer 
For purposes of this guidance, a “mobile medical app manufacturer” is any person or entity that 
manufactures mobile medical apps in accordance with the definitions of manufacturer in 21 CFR 
Parts 803, 806, 807, and 820.
- 9 - 
7
A mobile medical app manufacturer may include anyone who 
initiates specifications, designs, labels, or creates a software system or application for a regulated 
medical device in whole or from multiple software components. This term does not include 
persons who exclusively distribute mobile medical apps without engaging in manufacturing 
functions; examples of such distributors may include owners and operators of “Google play,” 
“iTunes App store,” and “BlackBerry App World.”  Examples of mobile medical app 
manufacturers include any person or entity that: 
·  Creates, designs, develops, labels, re-labels, remanufactures, modifies, or creates a 
mobile medical app software system from multiple components.  This could include a 
person or entity that creates a mobile medical app by using commercial off the shelf 
(COTS) software components and markets the product to perform as a mobile 
medical app;  
·  Initiates specifications or requirements for mobile medical apps or procures product 
development/manufacturing services from other individuals or entities (second party) 
for subsequent commercial distribution. For example, when a “developer” (i.e., an 
entity that provides engineering, design, and development services) creates a  mobile 
medical app from the specifications that were initiated by the “author,” the “author” 
who initiated and developed specifications for the mobile medical app is considered a 
“manufacturer” of the mobile medical app under 21 CFR 803.3. For purposes of this 
guidance, manufacturers of a mobile medical app would include persons or entities 
who are the creators of the original idea (initial specifications) for a mobile medical 
7
Regulatory definitions of the term “manufacturer” or “manufacture” appear in 21 CFR Parts 803, 806, 807, and 
820. For example -- under FDA’s 21 CFR 807.3(d)-- establishment registration and device listing for manufacturers 
and initial importers of devices-- ,“Manufacture, preparation, propagation, compounding, assembly, or processing 
of a device means the making by chemical, physical, biological, or other procedures of any article that meets the 
definition of device in section 201(h) of the act.” These terms include the following activities: (1) Repackaging or 
otherwise changing the container, wrapper, or labeling of any device package in furtherance of the distribution of 
the device from the original place of manufacture to the person who makes final delivery or sale to the ultimate 
consumer; (2) Initial importation of devices manufactured in foreign establishments; or (3) Initiation of 
specifications for devices that are manufactured by a second party for subsequent commercial distribution by the 
person initiating specifications.”  
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
app, unless another entity assumes all responsibility for manufacturing and 
distributing the mobile medical app, in which case that other entity would be the 
“manufacturer.”
- 10 - 
8
Software “developers” of a mobile medical app that are only 
responsible for performing design and development activities to transform the 
author’s specifications into a mobile medical app would not constitute manufacturers, 
and instead the author would be considered the manufacturer;  
·  Creates a mobile medical app and hardware attachments for a mobile platform that 
are intended to be used as a medical device by any combination of the mobile medical 
app, hardware attachments, and the mobile platform;  
·  Creates a mobile medical app or a software system that provides users access to the 
medical device function through a website subscription, software as a service,
9
or 
other similar means. 
In contrast, the following are examples of persons or entities that are NOT considered to be 
mobile medical app manufacturers (i.e., persons not within the definition of manufacturer in 21 
CFR Parts 803, 806, 807, and 820). Because they are not manufacturers, none of the persons or 
entities in these examples would have to register their establishments, list their products with the 
FDA
10
or submit a premarket application: 
·  Manufacturers or distributors of mobile platforms who solely distribute or market their 
platform and do not intend (by marketing claims -- e.g., labeling claims or advertising 
material) the platform to be used for medical device functions. When mobile medical 
apps are run on a mobile platform, the mobile platform is treated as a component of the 
mobile medical app’s intended use.
11
Therefore the mobile platform manufacturer is 
exempt from the Quality System regulation and registration and listing requirements.
12
For example, if it is possible to run mobile medical apps on BrandNamePhone but 
BrandNamePhone is not marketed by BrandNameCompany as intended for use as a 
medical device, then BrandNameCompany would not be considered a mobile medical 
app manufacturer or a medical device manufacturer.  Also, in this example, the 
BrandName Phone sold to consumers would not be regulated by FDA as a medical 
device. FDA does not consider entities that exclusively distribute mobile medical apps, 
such as the owners and operators of the “iTunes App store” or the “Android market,” to 
be medical device manufacturers.  FDA also does not consider mobile platform 
manufacturers  to be medical device manufacturer just because their mobile platform 
could be used to run a mobile medical app regulated by FDA.  
·  Third parties who solely provide market access to mobile medical apps (i.e. solely 
distribute mobile apps), but do not engage  in any manufacturing functions as defined in 
8
See 21 CFR 803.3 (definition of manufacturer) and 21 CFR 807.20(a)(2). 
9
By this we mean to include any “server software application” that provides a service to a client software 
application on a mobile platform. 
10
21 CFR 807.65 and 21 CFR 807.85  
11
See 21 CFR 820.3(c) which defines a component as “any raw material, substance, piece, part, software, firmware, 
labeling, or assembly which is intended to be included as part of the finished, packaged, and labeled device.”. 
12
21 CFR 807.65(a) and 21 CFR 820.1(a).  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested