c# pdf reader dll : Delete pages from pdf acrobat Library control class asp.net web page .net ajax solution_manual_of_advanced_engineering_mathematics_by_erwin_kreyszig_9th_edition-123-part222

224
Instructor’s Manual
12. ƒ(x) = e
π
x
, ƒ
(x) =
π
2
ƒ, ƒ(0) = 1. Hence (9b) gives
s
) =
π
2
s
(ƒ) = -w
2
s
(ƒ) +
w.
Ordering terms and solving for 
s
(ƒ) gives
(w
2
+
π
2
)
s
(ƒ) =
w,
s
(ƒ) =
.
14.
π
0
sin x sin wx dx =
16. The integrals in this problem and the next one can be reduced to Fresnel integrals.
This suggests the transformation wx = t
2
. Of course, if one does not see this, one
would start with, say, wx = v and then perhaps remember that the integral of v
1/2
sin v can be reduced to a Fresnel integral (38) in App. 3.1 by setting v = t
2
. The
present calculation is
0
x
1/2
sin wx dx =
0
w
1/2
t
1
(sin t
2
)2t dt w
1
=w
1/2
0
sin t
2
dt = w
1/2
.
18. The calculation is similar to that in Prob. 16 but requires an additional integration by
parts,
0
x
3/2
sin wx dx =
0
w
3/2
t
3
(sin t
2
)w
1
2t dt
=
w
1/2
0
t
2
sin t
2
dt
=
w
1/2
(-t
1
sin t
2
j
0
+
0
t
1
(cos t
2
)2t dt)
=
w
1/2
2
=2w
1/2
.
SECTION 11.9. Fourier Transform. Discrete and Fast Fourier Transforms,
page 518
Purpose. Derivation  of  the  Fourier  transform  from  the  complex  form  of  the  Fourier
integral; explanation of its physical meaning and its basic properties.
Main Content, Important Concepts
Complex Fourier integral (4)
Fourier transform (6), its inverse (7)
Spectral representation, spectral density
Transforms of derivatives (9), (10)
Convolution ƒ  g
Comments on Content
The complex Fourier integral is relatively easily obtained from the real Fourier integral
in Sec. 11.7, and the definition of the Fourier transform is then immediate.
π
8
8
π
8
π
8
π
2
π
2
π
8
π
2
π
2
π
sin
π
w
1 - w
2
2
π
2
π
w
w
2
+
π
2
2
π
2
π
2
π
im11.qxd  9/21/05  12:33 PM  Page 224
Delete pages from pdf acrobat - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
acrobat remove pages from pdf; add and delete pages in pdf
Delete pages from pdf acrobat - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from pdf document; delete a page from a pdf reader
Instructor’s Manual
225
Note that convolution ƒ  g differs from that in Chapter 6, and so does the formula
(12) in the convolution theorem (we now have a factor √2
π
).
Short Courses. Sections 11.4–11.9 can be omitted.
SOLUTIONS TO PROBLEM SET 11.9, page 528
2. By integration of the defining integral we obtain
0
e
(kiw)x
dx =
j
0
=
.
4. Integration of the defining integral gives
1
1
e
(2w)ix
dx =
(e
(2w)i
-e
(2w)i
)
=
2i sin (2 - w)
=
.
6. By integration by parts,
1
1
xe
iwx
dx =
(
j
1
1
-
1
1
e
iwx
dx)
=
(
+
-
e
iwx
j
1
1
)
=
(
+
(e
iw
-e
iw
))
=
(
-
)
=
(w cos w - sin w).
8. By integration by parts we obtain
0
1
xe
xiwx
dx =
(
j
0
1
+
0
1
e
(1+iw)x
dx)
=
(-(-1) 
+
j
0
1
)
=
(
-
)
=
(1 + e
1+iw
(-1 - i(-w + i)))
=
(1 + iwe
1+iw
).
1

√2
π
(-w + i)
2
1

√2
π
(-w + i)
2
1 - e
1+iw

(1 + iw)
2
-e
1+iw
1 + iw
1
√2
π
e
(1+iw)x

-(1 + iw)(1 + iw)
e
1+iw

-(1 + iw)
1
√2
π
1
1 + iw
xe
(1+iw)x

-(1 + iw)
1
√2
π
1
√2
π
i
w
2
2
π
isin w
w
2
icos w
w
2
π
1
w
2
2 cos w
-iw
1
√2
π
1
(-iw)
2
e
iw
-iw
e
iw
-iw
1
√2
π
1
-iw
xe
iwx
-iw
1
√2
π
1
√2
π
sin (w - 2)

w- 2
2
π
-i

√2
π
(2 - w)
-i

√2
π
(2 - w)
1
√2
π
1
k- iw
1
√2
π
e
(kiw)x
k- iw
1
√2
π
1
√2
π
im11.qxd  9/21/05  12:33 PM  Page 225
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Annotate & Comment. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print.
cut pages from pdf online; delete pages on pdf file
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
delete blank pages in pdf files; delete pages from pdf online
226
Instructor’s Manual
Problems  1  to  9  should  help  the  student  get  a  feel  for  integrating  complex
exponential functions and for their transformation into cosine and sine, as needed in
this context. Here, it is taken for granted that complex exponential functions can be
handled in the same fashion as real ones, which will be justified in Part D on complex
analysis. The problems show that the technicalities are rather formidable for someone
who faces these exponential functions for the first time. This is so for relatively simple
ƒ(x), and since a CAS will give all the results without difficulty, it would make little
sense to deal with more complicated ƒ(x), which would involve increased technical
difficulties but no new ideas.
10. ƒ(x)  = xe
x
(x > 0),  g(x)  = e
x
(x > 0).  Then  ƒ
= e
x
- xe
x
= g - ƒ, 
and by (9),
iw(ƒ) = (ƒ
) = (g) - (ƒ)
hence
(iw + 1)(ƒ) = (g) =
,
(ƒ) =
.
12. We obtain
=
=
.
14. Team Project. (a) Use t = x - a as a new variable of integration.
(b) Use c = 3b. Then (a) gives
e
2ibw
(ƒ(x)) =
=
=
.
(c) Replace w with w - a. This gives a new factor e
iax
.
(d) We see that ƒ
ˆ
(w) in formula 7 is obtained from ƒ
ˆ
(w) in formula 1 by replacing
wwith w - a. Hence by (c), ƒ(x) in formula 1 times e
iax
should give ƒ(x) in formula
7, which is true. Similarly for formulas 2 and 8.
SOLUTIONS TO CHAP. 11 REVIEW QUESTIONS AND PROBLEMS, page 532
12.
-
(cos x -
cos 3x +
cos 5x - + • • •)
14. 1 -
(cos
+
cos
+
cos
+• ••)
16.
(sin
π
x+
sin 2
π
x+
sin 3
π
x+ •• •)
18.
(1 - cos x + sin x +
cos 2x -
sin 2x + • • •)
20.
π
-2(sin x +
1
_
2
sin 2x +
1
_
3
sin 3x +
1
_
4
sin 4x + • • •)
22. 1/2 by Prob. 17. Convergence is slow.
4
5
2
5
sinh
π
π
1
3
1
2
2
π
5
π
x
2
1
25
3
π
x
2
1
9
π
x
2
8
π
2
1
5
1
3
2
π
1
2
sin bw
w
2
π
2i sin bw
iw√2
π
e
ibw
-e
ibw

iw√2
π
sin b(w - a)

w- a
2
π
-2i sin b(a - w)

a- w
i
√2
π
e
ib(aw)
-e
ib(aw)

a- w
i
√2
π
1

√2
π
(1 + iw)
2
1

√2
π
(1 + iw)
im11.qxd  9/21/05  12:33 PM  Page 226
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
best pdf editor delete pages; delete pages pdf file
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
add remove pages from pdf; delete pages from a pdf in preview
Instructor’s Manual
227
24. From the solution to Prob. 12 we obtain
+
(1 +
+
+• • •) =
π
/2
π
/2
dx = 1.
Hence the answer is 
π
2
/8.
26.
(sin x - sin 2x +
sin 3x +
sin 5x -
sin 6x +
sin 7x
+
sin 9x -
sin 10x + • • •) .
The sum of
-
(sin 2x +
sin 6x +
sin 10x + • ••)
is -1/2 if 0 < x <
π
/2 and 1/2 if 
π
/2 < x <
π
and periodic with 
π
. The sum of the
other  terms  is  the  rectangular  wave  discussed  in  Sec.  11.1.  A  sketch  of  the  two
functions will explain the connection.
28. 0.2976, 0.2976, 0.1561, 0.1561, 0.1052, 0.1052, 0.0792, 0.0792
30. y = 12 •
-
+
-
+- • • •
+C
1
cos
t+ C
2
sin
t
32.
0
dw
34.
0
cos wx dw
36.
0
sin wx dw
38.
b
a
e
iwx
dx =
j
b
x=a
=
40. 
c
) = 4
c
(ƒ) = -w
2
c
(ƒ) -
ƒ
(0), ƒ
(0) = -2. Hence
c
(ƒ)(w
2
+4) =
.
Now solve for 
c
(ƒ).
Similarly, again by two differentiations,
s
) = 4
s
(ƒ) = -w
2
s
(ƒ) +
wƒ(0),
ƒ(0) = 1.
Hence
s
(ƒ)(w
2
+4) =
w
and
s
(ƒ) =
.
w
w
2
+4
2
π
2
π
2
π
8
π
2
π
e
ibw
-e
iaw

w
ik
√2
π
e
iwx
-iw
k
√2
π
k
√2
π
2w
2
+1 - cos 2w - 2w sin 2w

w
3
4
π
1 - cos 2w

w
2
1
π
(sin 2w - sin w) cos wx + (cos w - cos 2w) sin wx

w
1
π
sin 4t
2
-16
3
16
sin 3t
2
-9
4
9
sin 2t
2
-4
3
2
sin t
2
-1
1
5
1
3
2
π
1
5
1
9
1
7
1
3
1
5
1
3
2
π
1
π
1
25
1
9
4
π
2
1
2
im11.qxd  9/21/05  12:33 PM  Page 227
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
delete blank page from pdf; delete page on pdf document
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
delete pages from pdf in reader; delete pdf pages in reader
CHAPTER 12 Partial Differential Equations (PDEs)
SECTION 12.1 Basic Concepts, page 535
Purpose. To familiarize the student with the following:
Concept of solution, verification of solutions
Superposition principle for homogeneous linear PDEs
PDEs solvable by methods for ODEs
SOLUTIONS TO PROBLEM SET 12.1, page 537
2. u = c
1
(y)e
x
+c
2
(y)e
x
.
Problems 1–12 will help the student get used to the notations in this chapter; in
particular, y will now occur as an independent variable. Second-order PDEs in this
set will also help review the solution methods in Chap. 2, which will play a role in
separating variables.
4. u = c(x)e
y2
6. u = c
1
(y)e
2xy
+c
2
(y)e
2xy
8. ln u = 2x
y dy = xy
2
+c
(x), u = c(x)e
xy2
10. Set u
y
=v. Then v
y
=4xv, v = c
1
(x)e
4xy
; hence
u=
vdy = c
1
(x)e
4xy
+c
2
(x).
12. u = (c
1
(x) + c
2
(x)y)e
5y
+
1
_
2
y
2
e
5y
. The function on the right is a solution of the
homogeneous ODE, corresponding to a double root, so that the last term in the solution
involves the factor y
2
.
14. c = 1/2.
Problems 14–25 should give the student a first impression of what kind of solutions
to expect, and of the great variety of solutions compared with those of ODEs. It should
be emphasized that although the wave and the heat equations look so similar, their
solutions are basically different. It could be mentioned that the boundary and initial
conditions are basically different, too. Of course, this will be seen in great detail in
later sections, so one should perhaps be cautious not to overload students with such
details before they have seen a problem being solved.
16. c = 6
18. c = √k/32
20. c = 2, 
arbitrary
22. Solutions of the Laplace equation in two dimensions will be derived systematically
in complex analysis. Nevertheless, it may be useful to see an unsystematic selection
of typical solutions, as given in (7) and in Probs. 23–25.
26. Team Project. (a) Denoting derivatives with respect to the entire argument x + ct
and x - ct, respectively, by a prime, we obtain by differentiating twice
u
xx
=v
+w
,
u
tt
=v
c
2
+w
c
2
and from this the desired result.
228
im12.qxd  9/21/05  5:16 PM  Page 228
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat. VB example code to create graphics watermark on multiple PDF pages within the
delete a page from a pdf acrobat; delete pages from pdf preview
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
as a kind of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS on slide with no more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe
cut pages out of pdf file; delete page on pdf reader
(c) The student should realize that u = 1/
x
2
+y
2
is not a solution of Laplace’s
equation in two variables. It satisfies the Poisson equation with ƒ = (x
2
+y
2
)
3/2
,
which seems remarkable.
28. A function whose first partial derivatives are zero is a constant, u(x, y) = c = const.
Integrate the first PDE and then use the second.
30. Integrating the first PDE and the second PDE gives
u= c
1
(y)x + c
2
(y)
and
u= c
3
(x)y + c
4
(x),
respectively. Equating these two functions gives
u= axy + bx + cy + k.
Alternatively,  u
xx
= 0  gives  u = c
1
(y)x + c
2
(y). Then  from  u
yy
= 0  we  get 
u
yy
=c
1
x+ c
2
=0; hence c
1
=0, c
2
=0, and by integration
c
1
=
α
y+
β
,
c
2
=
γ
y+
and by substitution in the previous expression
u= c
1
x+ c
2
=
α
yx +
β
x+
γ
y+
.
SECTION 12.2. Modeling: Vibrating String, Wave Equation, page 538
Purpose. A careful derivation of the one-dimensional wave equation (more careful than in
most other texts, where some of the essential physical assumptions are usually missing).
Short Courses. One may perhaps omit the derivation and just state the wave equation
and mention of what c
2
is composed.
SECTION 12.3. Solution by Separating Variables. Use of Fourier Series,
page 540
Purpose. This first section in which we solve a “big” problem has several purposes:
1. To familiarize the student with the wave equation and with the typical initial and
boundary conditions that physically meaningful solutions must satisfy.
2. To explain and apply the important method of separation of variables, by which the
PDE is reduced to two ODEs.
3. To show how Fourier series help to get the final answer, thus seeing the reward of
our great and long effort in Chap. 11.
4. To  discuss  the  eigenfunctions  of  the  problem,  the  basic  building  blocks  of  the
solution, which lead to a deeper understanding of the whole problem.
Steps of Solution
1. Setting u = F(x)G(t) gives two ODEs for F and G.
2. The boundary conditions lead to sine and cosine solutions of the ODEs.
3. A series of those solutions with coefficients determined from the Fourier series of
the initial conditions gives the final answer.
Instructor’s Manual
229
im12.qxd  9/21/05  5:16 PM  Page 229
SOLUTIONS TO PROBLEM SET 12.3, page 546
2. k(cos
π
tsin
π
x-
1
_
3
cos 3
π
tsin 3
π
x)
4.
(cos
π
tsin
π
x-
cos 2
π
tsin 2
π
x+
cos 3
π
tsin 3
π
x- + • • •)
6.
(cos
π
tsin
π
x+
cos 3
π
tsin 3
π
x-
cos 5
π
tsin 5
π
x- + • ••)
8.
(
cos 2
π
tsin 2
π
x-
cos 6
π
tsin 6
π
x+
cos 10
π
tsin 10
π
x- •• •)
There are more graphically posed problems (Probs. 5–10) than in previous editions,
so that CAS-using students will have to make at least some additional effort in solving
these problems.
10.
(sin
cos
π
tsin
π
x-
sin
cos 2
π
tsin 2
π
x
+
sin
cos 3
π
tsin  3
π
x-
sin
cos 4
π
tsin 4
π
x+ - •• •)
12. u =
n=1
B
n
* sin nt sin nx, B
n
* =
sin
14. Team Project. (c) From the given initial conditions we obtain
G
n
(0) = B
n
=
L
0
ƒ(x)sin
dx,
G
.
n
(0) =
n
B
n
* +
=0.
(e) u(0, t) = 0, w(0, t) = 0, u(L, t) = h(t), w(L, t) = h(t). The simplest w satisfying
these conditions is w(x, t) = xh(t)/L. Then
v(x, 0) = ƒ(x) - xh(0)/L = ƒ
1
(x)
v
t
(x, 0) = g(x) - xh
(0)/L = g
1
(x)
v
tt
-c
2
v
xx
=-xh
/L.
16. F
n
=sin (n
π
x/L), G
n
=a
n
cos (cn
2
π
2
t/L
2
)
18. For the string the frequency of the  nth mode is proportional  to n, whereas for the
beam it is proportional to n
2
.
20. F(0) = A + C = 0, C = -A, F
(0) =
β
(B + D) = 0, D = -B. Then
F(x) = A(cos
β
x- cosh
β
x) + B(sin
β
x- sinh
β
x)
F
(L) =
β
2
[-A(cos
β
L+ cosh
β
L) - B(sin
β
L+ sinh
β
L)] = 0
F
(L) =
β
3
[A(sin
β
L- sinh
β
L) - B(cos
β
L+ cosh
β
L)] = 0.
The determinant (cos
β
L+ cosh
β
L)
2
+sin
2
β
L- sinh
2
β
Lof this system in the
unknowns A and B must be zero, and from this the result follows.
From (23) we have
cos
β
L=
≈0
-1
cosh
β
L
2A
(1 - cos
π
)

n
π
(
n
2
-
2
)
n
π
x
L
2
L
n
π
2
0.04
π
n
3
π
5
1
16
2
π
5
1
9
2
π
5
1
4
π
5
25
2
π
2
1
100
1
36
1
4
8
π
2
1
25
1
9
√8
π
2
1
27
1
8
12k
π
3
230
Instructor’s Manual
im12.qxd  9/21/05  5:16 PM  Page 230
because cosh
β
Lis very large. This gives the approximate solutions
β
L
1
_
2
π
3
_
2
π
5
_
2
π
,• • • (more exactly, 1.875, 4.694, 7.855, • • •).
SECTION 12.4. D’Alembert’s Solution of the Wave Equation.
Characteristics, page 548
Purpose. To show a simpler method of solving the wave equation, which, unfortunately,
is not so universal as separation of variables.
Comment on Order of Sections
Section 12.11  on  the  solution of  the wave equation by the Laplace  transform may be
studied directly after this section. We have placed that material at the end of this chapter
because some students may not have studied Chap. 6 on the Laplace transform, which is
not a prerequisite for Chap. 12.
Comment on Footnote 1
D’Alembert’s Traité de dynamique appeared in 1743 and  his  solution of the vibrating
string problem in 1747; the latter makes him, together with Daniel Bernoulli (1700–1782),
the founder of the theory of PDEs. In 1754 d’Alembert became Secretary of the French
Academy of Science and as such the most influential man of science in France.
SOLUTIONS TO PROBLEM SET 12.4, page 552
2. u(0, t) =
1
_
2
[ƒ(ct) + ƒ(-ct)] = 0, ƒ(-ct) = -ƒ(ct), so that ƒ is odd. Also
u(L, t) =
1
_
2
[ƒ(ct + L) + ƒ(-ct + L)] = 0
hence
ƒ(ct + L) = -ƒ(-ct + L) = ƒ(ct - L).
This proves the periodicity.
4. (1/2
π
)(n
π
/2)• 80.83 = 20.21n
10. The Tricomi equation is elliptic in the upper half-plane and hyperbolic in the lower,
because of the coefficient y.
u= F(x)G(y) gives
yF
G= -FG
,
=-
=-k
and k = 1 gives Airy’s equation.
12. Parabolic. Characteristic equation
y
2
+2y
+1 = (y
+1)
2
=0.
New variables v =  = x, w =  = x + y. By the chain rule,
u
x
=u
v
+u
w
u
xx
=u
vv
+2u
vw
+u
ww
u
xy
=u
vw
+u
ww
u
yy
=u
ww
.
Substitution of this into the PDE gives the expected normal form
u
vv
=0.
G
yG
F
F
Instructor’s Manual
231
im12.qxd  9/21/05  5:16 PM  Page 231
By integration,
u
v
=c
(w), u = c
(w)v + c(w).
In the original variables this becomes
u= xƒ
1
(x + y) + ƒ
2
(x + y).
14. Hyperbolic. Characteristic equation
y
2
-y
-2 = (y
+1)(y
-2) = 0.
Hence new variables are v = y + x, w = y - 2x. Solution:
u= ƒ
1
(x + y) + ƒ
2
(2x - y).
16. Hyperbolic. New variables x = v and xy = w. The latter is obtained from
-xy
-y = 0,
=-
,
ln y = -ln x + c.
By the chain rule we obtain in these new variables from the given PDE by cancellation
of -yu
yy
against a term in xu
xy
and division of the remaining PDE by x the PDE
u
w
+xu
vw
=0.
(The normal form is u
vw
=-u
w
/x = -u
w
/v.) We set u
w
=z and obtain
z
v
=-
z,
z=
.
By integration with respect to w we obtain the solution
u=
ƒ
1
(w) + ƒ
2
(v) =
ƒ
1
(xy) + ƒ
2
(x).
18. Elliptic. The characteristic equation is
y
2
-2y
+5 =
[
y
-(1 - 2i)
][
y
-(1 + 2i)
]
=0.
Complex solutions are
= y - (1 - 2i)x = const,
= y - (1 + 2i)x = const.
This gives the solutions of the PDE:
u= ƒ
1
(y - (1 - 2i)x) + ƒ
2
(y - (1 + 2i)x).
Since the PDE is linear and homogeneous, real solutions are the real and the imaginary
parts of u.
20. Hyperbolic. Characteristic equation
y
2
+4y
+3 = (y
+1)(y
+3) = 0.
The solution of the given PDE is
u= ƒ
1
(x + y) + ƒ
2
(3x + y).
1
x
1
v
c(w)
v
1
v
1
x
y
y
232
Instructor’s Manual
im12.qxd  9/21/05  5:16 PM  Page 232
SECTION 12.5. Heat Equation: Solution by Fourier Series, page 552
Purpose. This section has two purposes:
1. To solve a  typical heat  problem by steps similar to  those for the wave equation,
pointing to the two main differences: only one initial condition (instead of two) and
u
t
(instead of u
tt
), resulting in exponential functions in t (instead of cosine and sine
in the wave equation).
2. Solution of Laplace’s equation (which can be interpreted as a time-independent heat
equation in two dimensions).
Comments on Content
Additional points to emphasize are
More rapid decay with increasing n,
Difference in time evolution in Figs. 292 and 288,
Zero can be an eigenvalue (see Example 4),
Three standard types of boundary value problems,
Analogy of electrostatic and (steady-state) heat problems.
Problem Set 12.5 includes additional heat problems and types of boundary conditions.
SOLUTIONS TO PROBLEM SET 12.5, page 560
2. u
1
=sin x e
t
, u
2
=sin 2x e
4t
, u
3
=sin 3x e
9t
. A main difference is the rapidity
of decay, so that series solutions (9) will be well approximated by partial sums of
few terms.
4. (c
2
π
2
/L
2
)10 = ln 2, c
2
=0.00702L
2
6. u = sin 0.1
π
xe
1.752
π
2t/100
+
1
_
2
sin 0.2
π
xe
1.752•4
π
2t/100
8. u =
(sin 0.1
π
xe
0.01752
π
2t
-
sin 0.3
π
xe
0.01752(3
π
)2t
+
sin 0.5
π
xe
0.01752(5
π
)2t
-+ •• •)
10. u
I
=U
1
+(U
2
-U
1
)x/L; this is the solution of (1) with u/t = 0 satisfying the
boundary conditions.
12. u(x, 0) = ƒ(x) = 100, U
1
=100, U
2
=0, u
I
=100 - 10x. Hence
B
n
=
10
0
[100 - (100 - 10x)] sin
dx
=
10
0
10x sin
dx
=-
cos n
π
=
•63.66.
(-1)
n+1
n
200
n
π
n
π
x
10
2
10
n
π
x
10
2
10
1
25
1
9
8
π
2
Instructor’s Manual
233
im12.qxd  9/21/05  5:16 PM  Page 233
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested