c# pdf reader dll : Delete pages of pdf preview application SDK utility html .net azure visual studio Speakout%20Pre-Intermediate%20Teacher%27s%20Resource%20Book1-part252

UNIT OVERVIEW 
Every unit of Speakout starts with an Overview, which lists the topics 
covered. This is followed by two main input lessons which cover grammar, 
vocabulary and the four skills. Lesson three covers functional language 
and focuses on important speaking and listening strategies. Lesson four is 
built around a clip from a BBC programme and consolidates language and 
skills work. Each unit culminates with a Lookback page, which provides 
communicative practice of the key language. 
INPUT LESSON 
Lesson one introduces the topic of the unit and presents the 
key language needed to understand and talk about it. The lesson 
combines grammar and vocabula特 with a focus on skills work. 
The target language and the CEF 
objectives are listed to clearly 
show the objectives of the lesson. 
Grammar and vocabulary sections 
o晴en include listening element 
to reinforce the new language. 
1W
o牜汲瀶rs.汴ﶫ
tht 
.
⸮⸮⸮⸮ 
'桊
琩ld瑲
畴l 
⤧�
瑬l氧
椡•桴 
1姽
⸺祯濽瑨kk晴瑦1Wl1 
��
u\
• 
Wor汯汬l灥n
.l潯t•tll❬ 
n
摩K�lh
牵. 
� 
of 
㙯Ⱞ 
∢瑨��-嘤≩ 
\�
r昮琡㭲w∢
伾�
�氮�
漾䴩
3�
ㅮ�
卣�
tkr眴
t桯tut潮搡t灥
t㠺
t瑴d 
瑕佩灴
16ㄮ 
O:爮:昼 瑲 
tvtOA䨾
琭lM.AJ祯
tt瑤汬
汬i楏
.扯t✨
ttlt. 
W
jW'䤡
l�
44ㅨt瑬 
'䵷
t�
∩携
歩奉潮 
l㸭�
� 
4尧
槽�
�"�W潬琢 
-
The motorcycle diaries 
䠮.-瑯潴
氧l∮ 
Ⱞ, 
•. • ,汬汦椮䤡I"H"''J,,t• 
••n.<l•• {:u""∧✢""'" 
·n�·y 
⸮ 
⠨" t•\•1·"�"∭•啯"l�
• 
⸮ld꯽nk ✢· 
·n.-1 
∢-﷽� 
氨t尡;<
(䌺楬llttⱴ'l'"∭
tUol('f':11⊷ 
Ⅼ"I售" 
屬t瑽䤧尮䤧Jt 
≲••武l{r昧ㅌ⵲.v•t⸬h"tv 
1❴⵩ru氧l)(l汜❬
·牯∢"'⸬'l''t氧1•':•"'· 
䌧捴
⸬W.䩉'潬氺l'瑬
l⸨irl爮a⺷❬<ll�tll 
尧 
⸮⸮. 
䤧佗
I∧t' 
·'"''! 1ㄱ� tr潩\≕
瑬 
汦tll渮 
\VIuJⰮIⰮ. • o漮ln•摬•ℽ, 昮
⹗﵉l(≫t I啉
昢✢''氧
�t 1ﴱ 
㩲, 1\≎慍
[䤩, ,I\�ㄱ∱䥊 
l氭•'✮�l尮'屩bflt')t')汬 搧f�H,Ⱘ 
䤢r 
昧'∧歬 At tt椨'"Jd 1
⸬"\,hr 
⸮ 
t.H"I⅊t tf)•l❬l••氧. 
&-cll•.•Ⱞtf⸮⸬.:o∧l.,.f,�,.·,⸬_.j, -t汧zu•·!t�
晦1 
⸮.⸮ 
⡁,⴬, 
( ∧
tr•Jf
⸮ 
jⰮ⸮⸬,J⹜Ib❉110"Wt瑯ﴮ
⸮⸮ 
• 
1ㄱ琮瓽牄 
⛽iR㬧,IH晜-
⸮ 
··椩•汬氮
lt屬J�䥩tn氬 
✱㭜 l⸧⸮•v⹲l⥉䤧 
•∧
⸮⸮⸮
--䥉 
�㄰M 
吮氮汬
瑯tdl祏
'䩦
P≢
yow瑴.M.h氧
硲h
ot扥
tunuyovl4t� 噬
t⤢
tot✮瑲dM 
l挮潮
瓽 
-TI)瑏∭ 
•⹓
⸮⸬⸮
⹴爮 
⸮ 
ⱴ 
㩨啉
䥉䥃䥉位
dt氧挮
潥a瓽ﵘt 
⸮⸬.汣弮潦ㅴ
t佩景坏
Each input spread has either a 
focus on listening or a focus 
on reading. 
Regular Speakout tips help students 
to develop their study skills both 
inside and outside the classroom. 
8 汢tm.汮瑦
瑣䵯眮t湤矽
⸮ 
䥬椧散 周
⸮⸮⸺ 
t 瑨
灴牴 
潦瑴瑯ﵕ
9 奉\ 汯l 
瀮t∮
t氧 
尮t� 瑷
t氧k 
㩴 坬
u眧 
t氧 
倮M ⋽
慊 瑬 
ⱟst�
J
.U献•灴て
trぴA.W
.攮.�
☺瑴汯
:.⹴偏
tr 
t
瑎 
b煬洺∧ 
b 㕯
••• 
欮I⴮�
昧汴璫⹴
I晴
牬4汦
⸮ 卯/�
瑦灡
⴮⹊ 
x�摷f牍,,r爮H䌮 
r戮汲 
瘹tc摯ll 
汦弮⥏
⸭晴
档⹶o�圧�
10A ぴ
r楢␰
l汴��
瓽⤧ 
on•�潲⥯䴧, 周l挬ta扯
焮⸼啃
∧l-a 
•t 
R�,摬 㜼㭯 
1 v瑴⸮
⸮⸮.⥏⴮.∧ 
l圡
⸮⸮⹵t 
⸮. 
f⡬氧汬澢f瑲
" 䡯楯㑬⡬ㄷ"畬⹴� 
i W乴灩
摫�-擽
W�爡 
' 䐴慴
琩Ɐ⸮⸮,∧
"搧橯
漮 
·�
搧❊楥 
瑯⸮
⸬l⸮
•�
瑬据
⸮⸮• 
坣�
⸮�
猭爮.�
⸭ㄯ 
圧�
䥃漨n楬
.⸺�t
_Ⱞ⹟�
戩住
I�
昢❹汬ⱟ 
汴⹟
.tw睹�
Ⱞ�
位昢 
·-0�
8 坯k⴮問倧呤❦
❯ﵬ
.睴
t.�攮 
t歜t�
t爮/otf�M楣
⸮ 
⸮⸮ 
Clear g牡mmar presen瑡tions are 
followed by written and oral practice 
as well as pronunciation work. 
Scanned for Agus Suwanto
Delete pages of pdf preview - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
copy pages from pdf to new pdf; delete page in pdf
Delete pages of pdf preview - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page from pdf reader; add and delete pages from pdf
INPUT LESSON 2 
Lesson two continues to focus on grammar and vocabulary 
while extending and expanding the topic area. By the end of the 
second lesson students will have worked on all four skill areas. 
Lexical sets are introduced in 
context. Practice of new words 
often includes pronunciation work. 
Eve特 pai
of input lessons includes 
at 
least one writing section with 
focus on a variety of different genres. 
2 v�∧牯⹟
⸮⸮⸮ 
⸮ 
❊�∮
扲⴮瑫瑔�· 
lA 睯,汩i椩
•\䌢�
楊⅍琮o 
景⸬
l-l扤
摴畬挭
⴮ 
瑮氢 ⸮
⸮,扣
⸮⸮⸮⸮ 
.⸮
⸮⸮⸮⸮. 
⸮ 佯
琮.�
ll汩
l�
﵎⸬
⸮r爭
氧畜 
• e匲�
-�
攮.-d. 
ⴭ�
( �
ㄱㄱ✪
-ぬ
佩tN�
䥯 
t潩
嘮潯牯
e-1圡
㑑祯
U�佒 
⸮⹡ⱟ
·�
,�
ꬾ-ﵡ
⹍I-款 
• 唧
瑯 
1尢ⰻ⸮⸭∧�
,,弭
-��
) ,⹟
• ��⸮.弮
⸮.䥏d⹥�
渺㩳�
d�
• 
1⸭
昧⵴愮" 
W瀮.ﴬ
琺㨺琧⸬∩
⹦汬氬•�
••⹮
⹴m琮
⸮⸮ 
••潮瑯憫
汬⴮
⸬ 
• '∭
∧•-
B �
琡.国
-�佯睲
•琮⸮瑯 
( 矽
⸮. 
⸬⸬
⸮. 
⸮ 
捲氬
漮L 
� tⵯ�
⠮ 
⸮ 
愮扥
N汴�揽
瑢hㄱ�
ㅦ 
l�
⸬❦ㅦ牴•"-Ⱞ
ld• 
11弮
⹟ﴧ
.. 
⸮ 
)��
⸮⸮ ⸮
⸮⸮⸮ 
⸮⸮⸮ 
s l桦∧
⸬ ⸮
⸮⸮�⴮
⸭ 
⸮.⸮⸮ �
.-
f⴮
⸢琰'➥�Ⱞ⸮ 
.
⸮⸮ 
7〮Ɐ.甬Ⱞ
⸮⸮爭
ⱏ搮
⸮⸮⸮⸮⸬ⵣ�
• 
t 圧
䥉䩃﷽
�-�
�ﶷ∮⹤ 
7A 
尮∧⸮
晴ⵣ�
瑩䥏 
�f 
⸮ 
偔⵲琮佉I 
瘮� 
.⸮ 
-·潯
I噉�
I�
'✢∢' 
,
⸬. 
. .⹟ .⸮ 
.
⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮ 
• 屯
M�⸬�损
9A 
圡瀮
M�
•弬䵃 
twtntM�
∧�
.⸮ Ⱞ 
⸮ 
汬Ⱞ
≲ 
.⸮⸮ 
䅊a 
⴮ 
⸮⸮ ⸮⸮﷽﷽牭-
⸮. 
n泽
椣 
t氧--럽·愺⸮.--∭·­
⸮ 牟⸮
⸬ 眮-汬氧�⸮
✢'∧
⸮⸬⸮ 
• 
⸮⸮, 
⸮r⸭.⸭
.tⱟ⸮⸬ 
_
.Ⱜ�
⸬, 
..⸮⸮⸮ 
r⸭
�Ⱞ
攮.p 
⸮ ⸮�牯.tl�
t弬
⸮ 
⸮⸮⸬M捊•Ⱞ
⹬' 
-
-
• �
Ⱞ⸬,�
䩎 
⸮. 
�瑷 ⸮.
⸮ 
瑬潴敲W瑬﷽
1汬汲-瑷�
⸮.⸮. Ⱞ. 
⸮ 
,瑴⸮⸮⹓�
•W••⴮
⸮⸮⸬ 
._, 啷⸬.ﴮ
,.�
⸮⸮.⸮. 
. 啬
汯圧
⸮⸮. 
l ⸮.⸮
⸮. 
Lexical sets 
o晴en expanded in 
the full colour Photo bank at the 
back of the Students' Book. 
Eve特 grammar section includes a 
reference to the Language bank with 
explanations and further practice. 
All lessons include a focus on 
speaking where the emphasis is on 
communication and fluency building. 
Scanned for Agus Suwanto
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net.
delete page on pdf reader; delete page in pdf preview
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net.
delete a page from a pdf; delete pages from a pdf online
FUNCTIONAL LESSON 
The third lesson in each unit focuses on a particular function, situation or transaction as 
well as introducing important speaking and listening strategies. 
The target language and the CEF 
objectives are listed to clearly 
show the objectives of the lesson. 
Students learn a lexical set 
which is relevant to the function 
or s
i
tuation
Students learn important speaking 
and listening strategies which can 
be transferred to many situations. 
1 ∧
" ⸮ �
� 
⸮⸮
⸮ 
瑫ꬮ圧
敍ⱟ⸬ 
.⸮
)⸴ 
䌮瑬䑩
M� 
⸮.Ⱞ⸬䡬I⸮
⸮⸬❗
M⤧�
瑬�
楬汬琧
⸮ 
瑯 
⸮ 
'·뜢•楴 ✢
ﶷ \⨧t瓽. 
⸭⸮
⸮. ⱷ 
.⸮
⸮⸮
⸮⸮⸮⸮. 
t✭_t⹟,弮⸮�
Ur ⶷≩
.⸮ 
lA ®⹳• �
-∧
琮ㅲ∺
⸦⸬.Ⱞ
⹡ 
瑊 
-· 
晽U 
⸮⸮. Ⱞ
Ⱞ⹟Ⱞ� 
⸮ 
N
䤧 
C 瑷
⸬NⰮ⸮∮
䵬弮献 
.⸮ 
1M 
U∧
Ⱞ 
⸮⸮ 
琭∢�
The functional language is learnt in 
context. often by listening to the 
language in use. 
SA eSb 汢
瑮 to汢昢
∢琡佦t, ∢氢
t楈 
瑲略(呬敲爢ﵳ(爩 
1 �
p·畴
��· 
lﶷ
⸮ ,.晍
)Ⱞ
⸬⸮⸮⸮.) ⸮⸮⸮⸮ ,⸮
C扯"•'慴' � 
.. 
1瑷伮⸮ 
I䍕
灬楴ㄧ
䥃�
∢ 
⸮ 
t汴
⸭, 
⸮. 
䝯 
⸮⸮⸮⸮ 
T﷽
h
l I 
._ ⸮. 
Jㅗ敮
㱩•P•琭汩瑩⸬䩍
䤡∧ 
Ⅼ1汴汬
6A ⠸獊 前
�.c�
q甮.�汴瑩≴
t㱯∮
⹇G䭴
kt售�
s歬扯
琻i⸮
⸬W.u
⡦潲 
唯瑥(U)1 
䔮trtn 1 
bt湬ct 1 
C.琮
r뜢.漭樧倮⸮⸢Ⱞr∢�
瑊�晴
琢∢⵴ kㅴN琧⊥
D唢 ⸮
⸮﷽
奴∭
㕗晴捴
⸬ 
⸮. 
瑊⴮♮汲牴 
c愮. 
⴮ ⸮
-⸮ ⸮⸮. ⴮ 
⸮⸮
⸺䅉祏
⸮. 
h
䨮⸮N䥗
❬o䍗\ 
⹟ 
,伧漭灲狽彟
_
_
w⸮
⸮ 
E浸
-
-⸮
㩲瑬㩡氢䞷爼 
汬c汬 
∢䝲
⸮⸬ ••琭•潷牯
﷽ 
Ⱞ • 
䝣屬⹟㄰偩 
⸮. ∢ �
·�
䩯 挮 
� 
...⸮.. ,〧 ⸮. 
l 伮瑬∧屯l牟
Wp✴⸮.牬捦M 
爮䥉pⱟ⸬.牰
⸬⸪⸮⸮n 
•\ 
• ❴
⸧昡
I 䄮l�∧'o 汦晟㙴
瑯瑯
l 挮
)汬u�牯⸭ㄱ 
c 䍂献• 氮
•氧牴a∧瑨牎•∧ 
7 圮�l•Ⱞ⹮䰺
l�⸮
⹤⹴
S⹢• 
䌢ln 
⴮㐱 
w 瑴c瑮扬o瑣奖
· 
• 
k�慴�䤡I∢ 
坉�
&戺
et瑬�∧伮Ⱞ
氶 
汵� 
⸮. 
瑦�
• 爮 �
c慮⸭瀮�
h�
⸮ 
⸮. 
The lesson ends with a speaking 
activity which gives students the 
chance to practise the new language. 
Scanned for Agus Suwanto
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
a preview component enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Delete unimportant contents:
delete page in pdf online; delete pdf page acrobat
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Erase PDF images. • Erase PDF pages. Miscellaneous. • Select PDF text on viewer. • Search PDF text in preview. • View PDF outlines. Related Resources.
delete a page from a pdf online; delete blank page from pdf
DVD LESSON 
The fourth lesson in each unit is based around an ext牡ct from a real BBC programme. 
This acts as a springboard into freer communicative speaking and writing activities. 
p
v
iew section gets students 
thinking about the topic of the 
extract and introduces key language. 
series of different tasks helps 
students to understand 
and 
en
j
o
the programme. 
⸮. 噷⸮
•-
1∮⸮瑦 
⥁�
⸮⸮ Ⱞⱟ
. 漮⸬⸮ ⸮
.
⸮⸮ 
tt'⹁ 
⴮伧
⸮⸬ ⸮
hⰮ
⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮Ⱞ
⸮ 
A ㅖ
listing about the programme 
sets 
the context and helps students 
prepare to watch the clip
LOOKBACK PAGE 
The key phrases box helps students 
to notice the key language for the 
speaking 
瑡k 
and builds confidence. 
Each unit ends with a Lookback page. which pro
v
ides further 
practice and review of the kelanguage covered in the u
n
it. The 
review exercises are a mixture of communicative activities and 
games. Further practice and 犷eview exercises can be 
found 
in 
the Workbook. The Lookback page also introduces the Video 
podcast, which features 
range of real people talking about one 
of the topics in the unit. 
The Speakout 
task 
builds 
on the 
topic of 
the 
extract and provides 
extended speaking practice. 
The W物teback task 
further 
extends 
the topic and provides 
communicative writing practi
c
e
-
-
-
⸮ 
Scanned for Agus Suwanto
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete page pdf; cut pages from pdf preview
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Excel. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Excel file in C#.net.
delete pages from pdf acrobat; delete a page from a pdf file
TEACHING APPROACHES 
•  
•  
• .' 
Ⱞ JI • • 
-
' -·. 
� 
0 9 
'• 
: i • •"' •• 
.Ⱞ 
:. -· 
..-
•• 
• _
� _ 
speakou
is designed to satisfy both students and 
teachers on a number of different levels. It offers engaging 
topics with authentic BBC material to really bring them to 
life. At the same time it offers a robust and comprehensive 
focus on grammar, vocabulary. functions and pronunciation. 
As the name of the course might su杧est, speaking activities 
are prominent, but that is not at the expense of the other 
core skills. which are developed systematically throughout. 
With this balanced approach to topics. language development 
and skills work, our aim has been to create a course book 
full of 'lessons that really work' in practice. Below we will 
briefly explain our approach in each of these areas. 
TOPICS AND CONTENT 
In 
Speakout 
we have tried to choose topics that are relevant 
to students' lives. Where a topic area is covered in other 
ELT courses we have endeavoured to find a fresh angle on 
it. It is clear to us that authenticity is important to learners, 
and many texts come from the BBC's rich resources (audio, 
visual and print) as well as other real-world sources. At 
lower levels, we have sometimes adapted materials by 
adjusting the language to make it more manageable for 
students while trying to keep the tone as authentic as 
possible. We have also attempted to match the authentic 
feel of a text with an authentic interaction. Eve特 unit 
contains a variety of rich and authentic input material 
including BBC Video podcasts (filmed on location in 
London, England) and DVD material, featuring some of the 
best the BBC has to offer. 
GRAMMAR 
Knowing how to recognise and use grammatical structures 
is central to our ability to communicate with each other. 
Although at first students can often get by with words 
and phrases, they increasingly need grammar to make 
themselves understood. Students also need to understand 
sentence formation when reading and listening and to be 
able to produce accurate grammar in professional and 
exam situations. We share students' belief that learning 
grammar is a core feature of learning a language and believe 
that a guided discove特 approach, where students are 
challenged to notice new forms works best. At the same 
time lea爺ing is scaffolded so that students are supported at 
all times in a systematic way. Clear grammar presentations 
a牥 followed by written and oral practice. There is also 
the chance to notice and practise pronunciation where 
appropriate. 
In Speakout you will find: 
· 
Grammar in context-
We want to be sure that the 
grammar focus is clear and memorable for students. 
Grammar is almost always taken from the listening or 
reading texts, so that learners can see the language in 
action, and understand how and when it is used. 
• 
Noticing-
We involve students in the discovery of 
language patterns by asking them to identi晹 aspects of 
meaning and form. and complete rules or tables. 
• 
Clear language reference-
As well as a summary of 
rules within the unit, there is also a Language bank which 
serves as a clear learning reference for the future 
• 
Focus on use 
-We ensure that there is plenty of 
practice, both form and meaning-based, in the Language 
bank to give students confidence in manipulating the 
new language. On the main input page we include 
personalised practice, which is designed to be genuinely 
communicative and to offer students the opportunity to 
say something about themselves or the topic. There is 
also regular recycling of new language in the Lookback 
review pages. and again the focus here is on moving 
learners towards communicative use of the language. 
VOCABU䱁RY 
Developing a wide range of vocabulary is key to increasing 
communicative effectiveness; developing a knowledge 
of high-frequency collocations and fixed and semi-fixed 
phrases is key to increasing spoken fluency. An extensive 
understanding of words and phrases helps learners become 
more confident when reading and listening. and developing 
a range of vocabulary is important for effective writing. 
Equally vital is learner-training. equipping students with the 
skills to record. memorise and recall vocabula特 for use. 
In Speakout this is reflected in: 
• 
prominent focus on vocabulary-
We include 
vocabula特 in almost all lessons whether in a lexical set 
linked to a particular topic. as preparation for a speaking 
activity or to aid comprehension of a DVD clip or a 
listening or reading text. Where we want students to 
use the language actively. we encourage them to use the 
vocabulary to talk about their own lives or opinions. At 
lower levels, the Photo bank also extends the vocabulary 
taught in the lessons. using memorable photographs and 
graphics to support students' understanding. 
· 
Focus on 'chunks'-
As well as lexical sets. we also 
regularly focus on how words fit together with other 
words. o晴en getting students to notice how words are 
used in a text and to focus on high-frequency 'chunks' 
such as verb-noun collocations or whole phrases. 
• 
Focus on vocabulary systems 
-We give regular 
attention 瑯 word-building skills, a valuable tool in 
expanding vocabula特. At higher levels. the Vocabulary 
plus sections deal with systems such as affixation, multi­
word verbs and compound words in greater depth. 
• 
Recycling and learner training-
Practice exercises 
ensure that vocabulary is encountered on a number of 
occasions: within the lessons, on the Lookback page. in 
subsequent lessons and in the Photo bank/Vocabula特 
bank at the back of the book. One of the main focuses 
of the S
pea
k
o
u
t tips-which look at all areas of language 
learning-is to highlight vocabulary learning strategies. 
aiming to build good study skills that will enable students 
to gain and retain new language. 
Scanned for Agus Suwanto
FUNCTIONAL LANGUAGE 
One thing that both teachers and learners appreciate is 
the need to manage communication in a wide variety of 
encounters, and to know what's appropriate to say in 
given situations. These can be transactional exchanges, 
where the main focus is on getting something done (buying 
something in a shop or phoning to make an enquiry), 
or interactional exchanges, where the main focus is on 
socialising with others (talking about the weekend, or 
responding appropriately to good news). As one learner 
commented to us, 'Grammar rules aren't enough -I need 
to know what to say.' Although it is possible to categorise 
'functions' under 'lexical phrases', we believe it is useful 
for learners to focus on functional phrases separately from 
vocabulary or grammar. 
The third lesson in every unit of Speakout looks at one such 
situation, and focuses on the functional language needed. 
Learners hear or see the language used in context and then 
practise it in mini-situations. in both a wrinen and a spoken 
context. Each of these lessons also includes a Lea牮 to 
section, which highlights and practises a useful strategy for 
dealing with both transactional and interactional exchanges. 
for example asking for clarification. showing interest. etc. 
Learners will find themselves not just more confident users 
of the language. but also more active listeners. 
SPEAKING 
The dynamism of most lessons depends on the success of 
the speaking tasks. whether the task is a short oral practice 
of new language, a discussion comparing information 
or opinions, a personal response to a reading text or a 
presentation where a student might speak uninterrupted 
for a minute or more. Students develop fluency when 
they are motivated to speak. For this to happen. engaging 
topics and tasks are essential, as is the sequencing of stages 
and task design. For longer tasks. students often need to 
prepare their ideas and language in a structured way. This 
all-important rehearsal time leads to more motivation 
and confidence as well as greater accuracy. fluency and 
complexity. Also. where appropriate. students need to hear 
a model before they speak. in order to have a realistic goal. 
There are several strands to speaking in Speakou琺 
· 
Communicative practice-
After introducing any 
new language (vocabulary. grammar or function) there 
are many opportunities in Spea氼out for students to use it 
in a variety of activities which focus on communication as 
well as accuracy. These include personalised exchanges, 
dialogues. flow-charts and role-plays. 
· 
Focus on fluency-
In every unit of Spea氼out 
we include opportunities for students to respond 
spontaneously. They might be asked to respond to a 
series of questions, to a DVD. 
Video podcast or a text. 
or to take part in conversations, discussions and role­
plays. These activities involve a variety of interactional 
formations such as pairs and groups. 
• 
Speaking strategies and sub
-
sk
ill
s-
In the third 
lesson of each unit, students are encouraged to notice 
in a systematic way features which will help them 
improve their speaking. These include, for example, 
ways to manage a phone conversation, the use of mirror 
questions to ask for clarification, sentence starters to 
introduce an opinion and intonation to correct mistakes. 
· 
Extended speaking tasks -
In the Speakout DVD 
lesson. as well as in other speaking tasks throughout 
the course. students are encouraged to anempt more 
adventurous and extended use of language in tasks such 
as problem solving. developing a project or telling a sto特. 
These tasks go beyond discussion: they include rehearsal 
time, useful language and a concrete outcome. 
LISTENING 
For most users of English (or any language, for that 
matter). listening is the most frequently used skill. A 
learner who can speak well but not understand at least as 
well is unlikely to be a competent communicator or user 
of the language. We feel that listening can be developed 
effectively through well-structured materials. As with 
speaking. the choice of interesting topics and texts works 
hand in hand with carefully considered sequencing and 
task design. At the same time, listening texts can act as a 
springboard to stimulate discussion in class. 
There are several strands to listening in Speakout: 
• 
Focus on authentic recordings-
In Speakout, we 
believe that it is motivating for all levels of learner to 
try to access and cope with authentic material. Each 
unit includes a DVD extract from a BBC documentary. 
drama or light entertainment programme as well as a 
podcast filmed on location with real people giving their 
opinions. At the higher levels you will also find unscripted 
audio texts and BBC radio extracts. All are invaluable in 
the way they expose learners to real language in use as 
well as different varieties of English. Where recordings, 
particularly at lower levels, are scripted, they aim to 
reflect the patterns of natural speech. 
• 
Focus on sub-skills and strategies-
Tasks across 
the recordings in each unit are designed with a number 
of sub-skills and strategies in mind. These include: 
listening for global meaning and more detail: scanning 
for specific information; becoming sensitised to possible 
misunderstandings; and noticing nuances of intonation and 
expression. We also help learners to listen actively by using 
strategies such as asking for repetition and paraphrasing. 
· 
As a context for new language-
We see listening 
as a key mode of input and Speakout includes many 
listening texts which contain target grammar, vocabulary 
or functions in their natural contexts. Learners are 
encouraged to notice this new language and how and 
where it occurs. often by using the audio scripts as a resource. 
· 
As a model for speak
in
g-
In the third and fourth 
lessons of each unit the recordings serve as models 
for speaking tasks. These models reveal the ways in 
which speakers use specific language to structure their 
discourse. for example with regard to turn-taking, 
hesitating and checking for understanding. These 
recordings also se牶e as a goal for the learners' speaking. 
Scanned for Agus Suwanto
TEACHING APPROACHES 
R䕁DING 
Reading is a priority for many students, whether it's for 
study, work or pleasure, and can be practised alone, 
an祷here and at any time. Learners who read regularly 
tend to have a richer, more varied vocabulary, and are 
often better writers, which in turn supports their oral 
communication skills. Nowadays, the Internet has given 
students access to an extraordina特 range of English 
language reading material, and the availability of English 
language newspapers, books and magazines is greater 
than ever before. The language learner who develops 
skill and confidence in reading in the classroom will be 
more motivated to read outside the classroom. Within 
the classroom reading texts can also introduce stimulating 
topics and act as springboards for class discussion. 
There are several strands to reading in Speakout: 
• 
Focus on authentic texts 
-As with Speakout listening 
materials, there is an emphasis on authenticity, and this is 
reflected in a number of ways. Many of the reading texts 
in Speakout are sourced from the BBC. Where texts have 
been adapted or graded, there is an attempt to maintain 
authenticity by remaining faithful to the text type in 
terms of content and style. We have chosen up-to-date, 
relevant texts to stimulate interest and motivate learners 
to read. The texts represent a variety of genres that 
correspond to the text types that learners will probably 
encounter in their eve特day lives. 
· 
Focus on sub-skills and strategies 
-
ISpeakout 
we strive to maintain authenticity in the way the 
readers interact with a text. We always give students 
reason to read, and provide tasks which bring about or 
simulate authentic reading, including real-life tasks such 
as summarising, extracting specific information, reacting 
to an opinion or following an anecdote. We also focus 
on strategies for decoding texts, such as guessing the 
meaning of unknown vocabulary, understanding pronoun 
referencing and following discourse markers. 
· 
Noticing new language-
Noticing language in use 
is key step towards the development of a rich 
vocabula特 and greater all-round proficiency in a language, 
and this is most easily achieved through reading. In 
Speakout, reading texts often serve as valuable contexts 
for introducing grammar and vocabula特 as well as 
discourse features. 
· 
As a model for writing 
-In the writing sections, as 
well as the Writeback sections of the DVD spreads, the 
readings se牶e as models for students to refer to when 
they are writing
in terms of overall organisation as well 
as style and language content. 
WRITING 
In recent years the growth of email and the internet has 
led to a shift in the nature of the writing our students need 
to do. Email has also led to an increased informality in 
written English. However, many students need to develop 
their formal writing for professional and exam
-
takin
pu牰oses. It is therefore important to focus on a range 
of genres, from formal text types such as essays, letters 
and reports to informal genres such as blog entries and 
personal messages. 
There are four strands to writing in Speakout: 
• 
Focus on genres -
In every unit at the four highe
levels there is sectiothat focuses on a genre of 
writing, emails for example. We provide a model 
to show the conventions of the genre and, where 
appropriate
we highlight fixed phrases associated with it. 
We usually then ask the students to produce their own 
piece of writing. While there is always a written product, 
we also focus on the process of writing, including the 
relevant stages such as brainstorming, planning, and 
checking. At Starter and Elementary, we focus on more 
basic writing skills, including basic written sentence 
patterns, linking
punctuation and text organisation, in 
some cases linking this focus to a specific genre. 
• 
Focus on sub-skills and strategies-
While dealin
with the genres, we include a section which focuses 
on sub-skill or strategy that is generally applicable to 
all writing. Sub-skills include paragraphing, organising 
content and using linking words and pronouns, while 
strategies include activities like writing a first dra晴 quickly, 
keeping your reader in mind and self-editing. We present 
the sub-skill by asking the students to notice the feature. 
We then provide an opportunity for the students to 
practise it. 
• 
Writeback-
At the end of eve特 unit, following the 
DVD and final speaking task, we include a Writeback 
task. The idea is for students to develop fluency in their 
writing. While we always provide a model, the task is 
not tied to any particular grammatical structure. Instead 
the emphasis is on using writing to generate ideas and 
personal responses. 
• 
Writing as a classroom activity-
We believe 
that writing can be ve特 usefully employed as an aid to 
speaking and as a reflective technique for responding 
to texts-akin to the practice of writing notes in the 
margins of books. It also provides a change of pace and 
focus in lessons. Activities such as short dictations. note­
taking. brainstorming on paper and group story writing 
are all included in Speakout. 
Scanned for Agus Suwanto
PRONUNCIATION 
In recent years, attitudes towards pronunciation in 
many English language classrooms have moved towards 
a focus on intelligibility: if students' spoken language is 
understandable, then the pronunciation is good enough. 
We are aware, however, that many learners and teachers 
place great importance on developing pronunciation that 
is more than 'good enough', and that systematic attention 
to pronunciation in a lesson, however brief, can have a 
significant impact on developing learners' speech. 
In 
Speakout. 
we have taken a practical, integrated approach 
to developing students' pronunciation, highlighting 
features that often cause problems in conjunction with 
a given area of grammar, particular vocabulary items 
and functional language. Where relevant to the level. a 
grammatical or functional language focus is followed by a 
focus on a feature of pronunciation, for example. the weak 
forms of auxiliary verbs or connected speech in certain 
functional exponents. Students are given the opportunity 
to listen to models of the pronunciation, notice the key 
feature and then practise it. 
TEACHING PRE-INTERMEDIATE LEARNERS 
Pre-intermediate students have usually not yet reached 
a plateau. This makes them potentially very rewarding 
to teach. While they have enough English to have a basic 
conversation, they will be able to see progress during the 
course in terms of the range, fluency and accuracy of 
output. 
Pre-intermediate students still probably see the English 
language in terms of small. discrete pieces-verb 
tenses learned sequentially and basic lexical sets such as 
colours, jobs, hobbies. animals. etc. -which they have 
not yet 'put together'. One of the keys to teaching at 
this level is to provide students with deeper encounters 
with the language: setting more challenging tasks than at 
elementary, and sometimes asking students to deal with 
the complexities of authentic material -text and film -in 
order to develop strategies for coping with incomplete 
understanding. Strategy development, both metacognitive 
(learning habits such as keeping a vocabulary notebook. 
watching films etc.) and cognitive (ways to deal with tasks 
at hand. e.g. using phrases to ask for help, predicting 
content by reading a title etc.). as at other levels. are 
essential for students' progress. 
Typically. pre-intermediate students are able to make 
themselves understood in a wider variety of situations 
than they could at elementary. They are also able to 
deal with short basic texts. However. they may have 
problems with extended discourse. This applies to all 
four skills: their spoken utterances will probably be short 
and their written compositions brief; they probably do 
little extensive reading, and they may have difficulty in 
sustaining concentration while listening to recordings or 
conversations that are longer than two minutes. One 
of the teacher's roles at this level is to gradually expose 
students to longer pieces of discourse while providing 
both linguistic and motivational support. Teachers should 
do thorough. personalised pre-reading/ pre-listening tasks, 
break long pieces into shorter sections. and use whole­
class activities in order to foster students' confidence. 
As regards the syllabus. it is very important for learners 
at this stage to encounter the same language again and 
again. Pre-intermediate students need a lot of review and 
recycling of grammar and vocabulary that they may have 
encountered but not yet mastered. Pre-intermediate is a 
key stage at which they begin to change passive knowledge 
(language they know) into active knowledge (language they 
can use). 
Here are our Top Tips for teaching at this level: 
• 
Recycle grammar and vocabula特. Although they will 
have covered many key points such as the past simple, 
they will not have mastered them. 
• 
Introduce learning strategies-e.g. for recording 
vocabulary-by modelling them. By now the students 
are beyond 'survival English' and should be able to sta牴 
'collecting' vocabula特 from the texts they encounter. 
• Look at how words work together. At elementa特 
students probably need to learn mainly one-word items 
in order to name things. but at pre-intermediate they are 
more able to work with phrases and chunks of language. 
• Get students into the habit of reviewing language 
frequently. You could begin each class with a short 
review of grammar and vocabulary learnt in the previous 
lesson, perhaps by using a game or photocopiable 
activity. 
• 
Do a lot of work on pronunciation through short drills. 
At this level. the students need to continue familiarizing 
themselves with the sounds of English. particularly the 
ways in which the sounds of words change in the context 
of connected speech. 
• 
Get students to self-correct. At pre-intermediate level, 
many students start to develop awareness of correct 
and incorrect English. You could try having small signals 
on the board, for example. -s for third person 's', -ed for 
past tense endings. When the students make a mistake, 
you can just point to the board to remind them. 
• Where possible. begin to use short authentic texts such 
as menus. brochures and newspaper articles. 
• Use role-plays and structured speaking tasks to 
encourage students to extend their speaking skills. 
• 
Encourage fluency by having conversations at the 
beginning or the end of the class. Use topics that 
students should all be able to talk about. like what they 
did at the weekend, or what their plans are for after the 
class. 
Scanned for Agus Suwanto
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested