c# pdf reader free : Delete a page from a pdf application SDK tool html .net asp.net online Spring20080-part288

Mishpacha 
April 2008 
Quarterly Publication of  
The Jewish Genealogy Society 
of Greater Washington 
“Every man of the children of Israel shall encamp by his own standard with the ensign of his family” Numbers 2:2 
Volume 27, Number 2                                        Spring 2008 
Mishpacha 
SephardicGen.com 
A major resource for Sephardic genealogists 
By JGSGW member JeffMalka < JeffMalka@SephardicGen > 
For the Jewish genealogist researching 
Sephardic ancestry, the SephardicGen website 
offers a unique and multifaceted resource. The 
non-commercial website, which first appeared in 
the late 1990s, has continuously expanded its 
offerings and today provides extensive and 
unique assistance in most aspects of Sephardic 
genealogical research. 
The home page < www.SephardicGen.com 
provides easy access to the website’s many 
subsections. There is a section on Sephardic history, another of articles on 
Sephardic genealogy, a large section of links to various Internet Sephardic 
resources by country of interest, a section devoted to descriptions and lists 
of Sephardic surnames, a comprehensive gazetteer of geographic loca-
tions where Sephardic communities lived, a section on archives, extensive 
bibliographies, links to a large number of Sephardic family websites, calen-
dar tools to convert dates from the many unusual calendars used in coun-
tries where Sephardic records were created, and even a collection of gen-
eral genealogy forms and Sephardic newslists. 
Rather than describe each section in turn, I will confine myself to the sec-
tion of Sephardic databases. This section, accessed through  
http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/databases.html > presently con-
tains about 60 different Sephardic databases.  Most of these are physically 
located on SephardicGen and were compiled primarily by Mathilde Tagger 
of Jerusalem. All of these are accessed through special search engines 
permitting complex searches including Soundex. To facilitate the Sephardic 
genealogist’s task, the SephardicGen database page also includes links to 
other important Sephardic databases, even if found elsewhere on the Inter-
net. Thus one finds links to searchable databases of Sephardic interest 
(Continued on page 3) 
Delete a page from a pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
acrobat extract pages from pdf; delete a page from a pdf in preview
Delete a page from a pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages pdf file; delete page in pdf reader
Mishpacha 
April 2008 
President 
Marlene Bishow 
MLBishow@comcast.net 
VP Programming 
Rochelle Gershenow 
rpgersh@comcast.net 
VP Membership 
Gene Sadick 
elsadick2@verizon.net
VP Logistics  
Jeff Miller 
SingingTM@comcast.net   
Corresponding Secretary  
Sonia Pasis  
mailto
sonyaMSKP@verizon.net  
Recording Secretary  
Eugene Alpert  
gene1@ix.netcom.com  
Treasurer  
Eleanor Matsas
ematsas@aol.com
Past President 
Ben Fassberg
BenjaminF@aol.com
Member-At-Large 
Jeff Miller 
SingingTM@comcast.net   
Database Manager  
Marlene Bishow 
MLBishow@comcast.net 
Hospitality  
Sonia Pasis  (TEMP) 
Librarian  
Gene Sadick 
elsadick2@verizon.net
Mishpacha Editor  
Margarita Lackó  
mailto:
mishpologia@uzidog.com  
Publicist 
Jeff Miller (TEMP) 
Speaker’s Bureau  
Benjamin Fassberg  
BenjaminF@aol.com
Research Coordinator  
OPEN 
Webmaster  
Aaron Werbel  
Werbel@mail.com  
Workshop Coordinator  
Marlene Bishow (TEMP)  
mailto
sonyaMSKP@verizon.net  
MLBishow@comcast.net 
SingingTM@comcast.net   
Cemetery Project 
Marlene Bishow  
MLBishow@comcast.net 
JGSGW Officers and Commitee 
Chairs for 2007 - 2008 
The JGSGW Web Site is located at: 
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsgw 
Mishpacha
Mishpacha
Mishpacha
Mishpacha
is the  quarterly publication  of the  Jewish 
Genealogy Society of Greater Washington, Inc., serving 
Washington,  Northern  Virginia,  and  the  Maryland 
suburbs. 
Mishpacha 
Mishpacha 
Mishpacha 
Mishpacha 
is distributed electronically. 
Free  to  members,  subscriptions  are  $15  and  $20 
foreign.  Membership  dues  are  $30  for  individuals  and 
$45 for  families. Membership inquiries: PO  Box  31122, 
Bethesda, MD 20824-1122. 
Mishpacha
Mishpacha
Mishpacha
Mishpacha
by  the  Jewish  Genealogy  Society  of 
Greater  Washington  (JGSGW).  All  rights  reserved. 
Mishpacha
Mishpacha
Mishpacha
Mishpacha
is  intended  to  provide  a  free  exchange  of 
ideas, research  tips, and articles  of interest to persons 
researching  Jewish  family  history.  Permission  for 
reproduction  in  part  is  hereby  granted  for  other  non-
profit use, provided credit is given to the JGSGW and to 
the author(s) of the reproduced material. As a courtesy, 
we  request  letting  us  know  that  a  published  article  is 
being  used.  All  other  reproduction  without  prior  written 
permission of the editor(s) is prohibited. 
All JGSGW members are encouraged to submit their 
genealogical  research  experiences  for  publication  in 
Mishpacha
Mishpacha
Mishpacha
Mishpacha
 Submit  articles  to  the  editor:  Margarita 
Lackó < mishpologia@uzidog.com >. 
©
2008 Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington, Inc.
Table of Contents 
SephardicGen
.........................................
..........     1 
IAJGS Cemetery Project and JOWBR As Tools  
for the Genealogy Researcher ...........................     4 
Reunion of Trochenbrod Descendants......................     5 
          Overseas Research ....................     8 
          Domestic Research ...................    10 
Society News 
Welcome to our New Members ................................   11 
President’s Perspective ............................................   12 
Board Meeting Summary ..........................................   13 
Library Update ..........................................................   14 
What is a “cash boy”? ...............................................   17 
Upcoming JGSGW Programs ...................................  18 
Special thanks to Liz Lourie & Fred Kolbrener  
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete pages from pdf acrobat reader; delete page from pdf document
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
copy pages from pdf to new pdf; delete page in pdf file
Mishpacha 
April 2008 
prepared by the Israel Genealogy Society, the searchable French archives in Aix en Provence, 
Alain Farhi’s large “Fleurs de l’Orient” searchable database, and Dan Kazez’ collection of Istanbul 
Rabbinate records, among many others. 
Many of the searchable databases on SephardicGen were newly created and appear here for the 
first time. As a sample there are databases of surnames and associated data extracted from Abra-
ham Galante’s 9 volume Histoire des Juifs de Turquie (History of the Jews of Turkey), Joseph Ne-
hama’s 7 volume study of the Jews of Salonika, databases of rabbis from Turkey, Morocco, Bul-
garia, Algeria, Salonika, etc., WWII Sephardic deportees, 19
th
century Algerian Jewish voter lists, 
19-20
th
century Russe (Bulgaria) wedding register, and soon the complete birth and marriage re-
cords of the Sephardic community of Vienna, Austria, among many more. 
Because it would be tedious to search individually through all these individual databases, 
SephardicGen also has a searchable Consolidated Index of Sephardic Surnames (CISS), a sort of 
“Index of Indexes”. Presently containing close to 50,000 names it will probably be much larger by 
the time you read this. A search for a name in this composite index provides a list – often several 
pages long – of which specific databases contain detailed information on the surname searched. 
The results page even provides links that permit the visitor to go directly to the database in ques-
tion for the more detailed data search. 
Many Sephardim grew up in francophone homes and many are still today more comfortable speak-
ing French than English. To accommodate these researchers, the SephardicGen website also pro-
vides French versions of the database section’s main page and its various search engines. The 
French versions can be accessed either through a link on the English database page or directly at 
http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/databasesFR.html >. 
Finally, a quick comment about the unique Sephardic gazetteer. This is a database of the many 
locations where Sephardic communities exist or have existed in the past. Searchable by any of the 
locations’ alternate names (or by country), the search results provide the alternative names, the 
country and province, and the geographic latitude and longitude of the town or village in question. 
There is even a link by each location to the Steve Morse engine that can provide a geographic 
map of the location. The Sephardic gazetteer is of special value to the Sephardic genealogist be-
cause it includes many places that no longer exist today on any modern map. Because of this and 
its inclusion of alternate and rare historic names a search in this database can solve many a pesky 
geographic enigma. 
This article only describes a portion of the SephardicGen website. There are many other sections 
of the website to explore. Those researching their Ashkenazi roots might consider reading how 
Jewish populations have changed over the centuries. As late as the 12
th
century, 90% of all Jews 
were Sephardim. In the 1100s, there were Jewish communities of 12,000 Jews in several Spanish 
cities (Córdoba, Granada, etc.), while the largest Jewish communities in Europe were those of 
Frankfurt am Main and Vienna with 700 and 1,200 respectively. Where did today’s Ashkenazi Jews 
come from? If the Ashkenazi genealogist could go back far enough many would be surprised to 
find Sephardic connections. The notarial records of Spain are voluminous and because many 
Sephardic surnames are ancient, this greatly extends how far back one can go in Sephardic re-
search. I found records of Jewish MALKA families living continuously for 250 years in the same 
neighboring towns of Aragón from the 13
th
century to just one year before the 1492 expulsion. 
!
ED. NOTE: See Jeffrey S. Malka’s article in the Winter 2007 issue of AVOTAYNU. 
SephardicGen.com...(Continued from page 1) 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF: Insert PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Insert a New Page to PDF in VB.NET. Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program.
pdf delete page; cut pages out of pdf
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete a page from a pdf acrobat; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
Mishpacha 
April 2008 
IAJGS Cemetery Project and JOWBR As Tools  
for the Genealogy Researcher 
Submitted by Marlene Katz Bishow < mlbishow@comcast.net > 
How many of you know that the IAJGS Cemetery Project was largely constructed through the ef-
forts of our member and JGSGW Past President Arline Sachs (also former secretary of the Inter-
national Association of Jewish Genealogy Societies (IAJGS)) and her husband Sidney Sachs? 
The present coordinator for North America is our President, Marlene Bishow. 
The objective of the Cemetery Project is to identify Jewish burial sites and interments throughout 
the world. One approach to using the IAJGS database is to identify potential sites of family buri-
als. If you know the name of the city or town where your family member lived and you would like 
to find out about the cemetery or cemeteries in the area; consult the IAJGS Cemetery Project at  
http://www.jewishgen.org/cemetery/instructions/ >. After selecting the area of the world and then 
the country or state, survey the information by city or town to see what cemeteries are or have 
been sites of Jewish burials. The listing may provide some information about the associated Jew-
ish community and congregation. Most listings also contain contact information for the caretaker 
or other responsible parties. The location of the cemetery and how to reach it are included in most 
instances. You may want to visit the cemetery to pay respects, to photograph the site or, to 
search cemetery records, if they are available. Only the largest cemeteries have on-site offices, 
so you may need to contact the associated congregation or society. 
Another approach is to check the JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry (JOWBR) at  
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/cemetery/ > for specific individuals or for family names. If 
you get a positive hit, you may find a small amount of information about where the person is bur-
ied, dates, and other information of interest and value to researchers. Using the information found 
on this site, you may cross-reference it by means of the IAJGS Cemetery Project for location, 
contact person, and directions. 
Researchers should also look for a specific cemetery website. This information is often indicated 
in the IAJGS listing, but new websites are showing up more frequently. There are also public and 
private (paid) websites with cemetery information and photographs of grave markers. By doing a 
Google search on the name of the cemetery, followed by a comma and the location; you may be 
able to find additional information. 
If a researcher finds no information on a particular cemetery or plot of interest, the researcher 
may want to do a grave by grave survey of that plot. Using the instructions on the JOWBR web-
site and the spreadsheet, which is also downloadable from that site, the aggregated data may be 
submitted to JOWBR. JOWBR also accepts digital photos of the graves. Local assistance with 
preparation of the data for submission is available from Marlene Bishow< mlbishow@comcast.net >. 
!
Before travelling to another city, check the IAJGS Master Calendar < http://
www.iajgs.org/calends/jgscalendar.html > for Jewish Genealogy Society’s sche-
duled programs. In February, I heard Henry Wellisch from Toronto, Canada, give 
a lecture about “The Austro-Hungarian Empire: Conventional and Non-
Conventional Resources” at the JGS of Broward County, and attended Steve 
Morse’s presentation "One-Step Webpages: A Potpourri of Genealogical Search Tools" at the 
JGS of Greater Miami, both in Florida. [ED.] 
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET: Delete a Character in PDF Page. It demonstrates how to delete a character in the first page of sample PDF file with the location of (123F, 187F).
delete blank page from pdf; delete pdf pages online
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; Delete image objects in selected PDF page in ASPX webpage.
delete pages from a pdf in preview; delete page in pdf document
Mishpacha 
April 2008 
Reunion of Trochenbrod Descendants 
By Rose Blitzstein Elbaum < rochel613@yahoo.com  > 
The small town of Trochenbrod, about 30 km northeast of Lutsk in Volhynia gubernia, northwest-
ern Ukraine, has become familiar to many people thanks to Jonathan Safran Foer’s 2002 novel, 
Everything is Illuminated. Families from surrounding villages settled the marshy area in the early 
1800s as a farming colony. It was officially recognized by the Soviet regime in 1835 and given the 
name Sofiyevka (now known as Zofyuvka), after the Russian princess Sofia who gave land for the 
settlement. However, since the town’s inhabitants were all Jews who took advantage of the Czar’s 
edict of 1827, which exempted Jewish farmers from obligatory enlistment in the army for a period 
of fifty years, they persisted in referring to the town by the Yiddish name Trochenbrod and re-
served the Russian name for official use only. 
By 1889, 235 families (about 1200 people) lived in Trochenbrod. The town steadily grew until it 
had a population of 3,000 Jews by 1938. Trochenbrod was unique in that the population was all 
Jewish save the postmaster, Rizhard Labinsky, who according to Russian and Polish custom, 
was required to be a non-Jew. The inhabitants consisted mainly of farmers and tanners, but there 
was also a glass factory as well as service-related enterprises such as cafes, inns, grocers and 
other retail establishments. 
All the residents were observant Jews who attended seven different synagogues in their small 
town – three big ones: Homilner, Mikever and Barshafsky, and four Hasidic batei midrash (study 
houses) named after the Hasidic leaders from Trisk, Olyka, Berezna and Stepan. The style of 
davening (praying) was Nusach Sfard, one of the three main styles of prayer, and to this day Beth 
Sholom Congregation in Potomac, which was started by immigrants from Trochenbrod and the 
surrounding villages, still davens Nusach Sfard. 
The area of Trochenbrod was small, only about 17,000 acres. It consisted of one main road, 
which was always muddy in wet weather, with houses one after another on both sides of the road. 
Each property extended quite a distance behind the house. The town could not be expanded be-
cause it was surrounded by forests and many of the young people were compelled to emigrate to 
North and South America, especially to Argentina. 
During World War I Trochenbrod suffered a great deal because the front was only about four 
miles from the town and its inhabitants were forced to work for the Austrian and German armies 
for a period of nine months. The army would distribute small portions of bread, salt and the hind-
quarters of beef from cattle slaughtered by Jewish shochtim (ritual slaughterers) to the residents 
who worked for the army. 
At the start of the Russian Revolution, the young people of Trochenbrod organized many Hebrew 
and Zionist institutions. After the Poles captured Trochenbrod in 1920, the residents raised money 
and taught Hebrew in a Hebrew school headed by Rabbi Eliyahu David Yisroel Schuster, who 
also gave private Hebrew lessons. 
Thanks to Arthur Blitstein, a Chicago relative of mine who had the foresight in the 1950s to inter-
view elderly members of the BLITZSTEIN family, we have a family tree which dates back to David 
BLITSTEIN, born about 1790, and his siblings. David’s son Hershel, my gggrandfather, was 
forced to flee Trochenbrod because of a dispute with the authorities and emigrated to America 
about 1890 when he was eighty years old. He worked as a laborer on the World’s Fair from 1893 
until he died in 1896. He is buried in Chicago. However, his wife and eleven children all remained 
(Continued on page 6) 
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
document. If you find certain page in your PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page directly. Moreover, when
delete pages from pdf online; delete pdf pages ipad
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
C#.NET Sample Code: Delete Text from Specified PDF Page. The following demo code will show how to delete text in specified PDF page. // Open a document.
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; delete pages pdf files
Mishpacha 
April 2008 
in Trochenbrod. My grandfather, Shoel Blitzstein, had a farm where he raised his own vegetables, 
had a milk cow, and traded in horses. His nine children were all expected to help on the farm as 
soon as they were old enough. He had a reputation in the surrounding towns as an honest man, 
and many non-Jews would only buy from him. 
The children in Trochenbrod all attended heder (Hebrew school), and when they were old 
enough, the boys were sent out of town to yeshiva. My father, Nathan BLITZSTEIN, who was no 
exception, told me many stories of his days at yeshiva in Rovno, Ukraine. 
In August and September 1942 the Nazis and their collaborators murdered the entire population 
of the town, save about 35 including my grandfather Shoel, my father Nathan and one brother 
Avraham, who all managed to flee into the nearby Radziwiller forest. Another brother, Hershel, 
had left Trochenbrod in 1938 and made his way illegally to Palestine. Those who escaped joined 
the partisans and fought against the Nazi machine. Trochenbrod caught fire and was burned 
down completely. The town was never rebuilt. 
After the War, most Trochenbrod survivors emigrated to Israel, where they formed a landsman-
shaft, an organization to keep the memories of Trochenbrod alive, which they named Beit-Tal. In 
1988, they published a yizkor book titled Ha'Ilan V'Shoreshav (The Tree and Its Roots) in Hebrew 
and Yiddish. After the former Soviet Union broke apart, the Israeli survivors arranged to erect 
matzevas (memorial stones) in the town of Trochenbrod as well as in the forest of Yaromel, a few 
kilometers dis-
tant, where Tro-
chenbrod’s Jews 
were led to their 
mass grave. In 
August 1992 I 
accompanied my 
father and ten 
Israelis to Tro-
chenbrod for the 
dedication of the 
monuments. At 
that time, I was 
the only second-
generation mem-
ber who ex-
pressed interest 
in seeing the 
town where my 
father had spent 
his youth. How-
ever, I am 
pleased to say 
that I am now part of a group that is reaching out to form a network of second, third and fourth 
generation “Trochenbroders.” During the first quarter of the twentieth century many people from 
Trochenbrod immigrated to the United States. In the 1920s, organizations of Trochenbrod immi-
grants sprang up in Washington, DC, Baltimore, New York, Toledo, Cleveland, Chicago and other 
cities. By the late 1970s all of these had dissolved because of the death of most of the original im-
migrants. 
Trochenbrod Descendants
...
(Continued from page 5)
(Continued on page 7) 
Mishpacha 
April 2008 
Now many of these descendants and their children from across the United States are coming to-
gether in April to rediscover each other; to remember their ancestors and their Trochenbrod 
through public storytelling, video and photographs; and to talk about ways to keep alive the mem-
ory of Trochenbrod.  
If you are descendant of Trochenbrod residents, please join us on Sunday, April 13
th
, 4 pm, at 
Sixth & I Historic Synagogue for this first ever Trochenbrod gathering in the U.S. If you know of 
someone who has roots in Trochenbrod, please forward this information to them. You can reach 
me at < rochel613@yahoo.com  >. Or go to the new Beit-Tal website at < www.bet-tal.com >. 
!
Trochenbrod Descendants
...
(Continued from page 6)
IAGJS SALUTES! 
Sidney & Arline Sachs
For ten years Sidney and Arline Sachs have produced a public access tele-
vision series, Tracing Your Family Roots < http://tracingroots.nova.org >. 
The series’ shows have increased the knowledge of available resources, 
demonstrated creative techniques, and increased the number of individuals 
who participate in Jewish genealogy. Sidney has produced the series, while Arline and Dr. Sally-
ann Sack have performed as co-hosts of the show. The shows are broadcast in the District of 
Columbia, Maryland and Virginia, and are now available on the website. 
With their Tracing Your Family Roots show, Sidney and Arline have helped spread the word 
about Jewish genealogy through their dedicated and tireless efforts and creative programming. 
Sidney and Arline Sachs are members of the JGSGW.  
Congratulations on your IAJGS honor. It is well deserved! 
Mishpacha
Mishpacha
Mishpacha
Mishpacha
needs your stories! 
I would like to hear what YOU are interested in…… 
∗ 
Do you have a problem finding your ancestor in 
some database? Write your questions and we'll 
try to answer them. 
∗ 
Did you find your ancestor in some database? 
Tell us what steps you followed so that others can 
learn. 
∗ 
Did you find/meet an x-times removed cousin? 
Share your joy with us. 
Please participate in the continuing success of our 
newsletter by sending your comments, questions, 
findings or stories to me at mishpologia@uzidog.com  
Mishpacha 
April 2008 
Overseas Research 
Volga Germans in Argentina 
Many descendants of the Volga Germans migrated from Russia to Argentina from 1875 onwards. 
The website < http://www.alemanesvolga.com.ar/ > has a short history of the Germans from 
Volga, their culture, a vast bibliography and history of the colonization in Argentina. Most of the 
colonies < http://www.alemanesvolga.com.ar/historia/colonias/index.html >, have a list the names 
of the founding members. In Spanish. 
Dachau Concentration Camp Records 
Steve Morse < http://www.stevemorse.org > has added a One-Step search application for the 
160,000 inmates at the Dachau Concentration Camp. Unlike many of his other tools that search 
data on other websites, this entire database is on his own website. He received the data from Pe-
ter Landé of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. To search, click 
on “Dachau Records” in the “Holocaust and Eastern Europe” section. To read about this data-
base, click on the “Introduction” button. 
Frankfurt Memorbuch: New Digitized Manuscript 
The National Library of Israel has announced public access of a digitized version of the Frankfurt 
Memorbuch, one of the most important sources of genealogical data on German Jewry. This 
manuscript documents the deaths of important members of the Jewish community of Frankfurt am 
Main over a period of almost 300 years (1628-1907). The Introduction, in English, can be found at 
http://jnul.huji.ac.il/dl/mss/heb1092/index_eng.html >. The site includes page and date indexes, 
in Hebrew. To view these images it is necessary to download the free DjVu viewer program. < 
http://www.lizardtech.com/download/dl_options.php?page=plugins >.  
Tokyo Jewish Cemetery 
The Jewish Community of Japan has an on-line list of those interred in the Yokohama Foreigner's 
Cemetery - Jewish Section < http://www.jccjapan.or.jp/Cemetery/index.htm  >. Please direct your 
questions to the Jewish Community of Japan (link found at the bottom of the page).  
Irish Census - 1911 Dublin 
The Irish National Archives has put the 1911 census returns for Dublin City and County on-line. 
Digitized images of the original census returns in pdf format may be searched, viewed and 
downloaded. The database is free. Go to < http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/search/ > 
Historical Currency Conversions 
The website states: “This form allows you to convert the historical buying power of American and 
British currencies into current dollars. ... the quantity can be entered as a number like "1000" or 
"10 million" or any mathematical expression.” < http://futureboy.homeip.net/fsp/dollar.fsp > 
Mishpacha 
April 2008 
IIJG Research Grants 
Submitted by Anne Feder Lee, IAJGS President 
The International Institute for Jewish Genealogy and Paul Jacobi Center (IIJG) at the Jewish Na-
tional and University Library, Jerusalem, is accepting proposals for ground-breaking research in 
six preferred areas of Jewish Genealogy, for the academic year 2008– 2009. Successful appli-
cants will be awarded grants of up to $10,000. Deadline for the submission of proposals is 31 May 
2008. "Instructions to Applicants" (to be followed carefully) are to be found on the Institute's web-
site < http://www.iijg.org > (under "Projects", then "Upcoming Projects", then "Call for Projects"). 
28th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy 
Co-Sponsored by the IAJGS, the JGS of Illinois and the Illiana JGS 
Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile, Chicago, Illinois 
Chicago, Illinois, 17-22 August 2008 
www.chicago2008.org > 
∗ 
Registration is now available at the Conference website. Early registration ends April 30. 
∗ 
For up-to-date information, questions and answers, join the Conference Discussion Group. 
∗ 
Special Interest Groups (SIGs) will have their annual meetings and luncheons. 
∗ 
Don’t miss “Breakfast with The Experts” and the “Jewish Film Festival.” 
∗ 
Computer training workshops: Registration is $25.00 and limited to 25 individuals per work-
shop (note: many workshops offered at last year's conference sold out). 
∗ 
NEW: Shabbat Dinner on Friday, August 15 and Welcome Dinner on Saturday, August 16.  
∗ 
Conference program is now online (subject to change). 
Tips for preparing for the Conference: 
∗ 
Guide to Jewish Genealogy in Chicagoland < www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/Chicago >. 
∗ 
Maps of cemeteries: < http://tinyurl.com/3ycbqa > (bottom of page). 
Domestic Research 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested