c# pdf reader free : Delete pages from a pdf reader SDK control API .net web page wpf sharepoint std_eng_30811-part330

8
one that is exhibited by the teacher.  They stress that scaffolding also includes concern, warmth,
and responsiveness.  Praise and feedback are important elements, as are talking through phases of
the task.  Scaffolding also keeps the student in Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal Development or
ZPD, and promotes “self-regulation.”  The student, therefore, takes as much responsibility as
possible, and eventually takes on the language and strategies to regulate independent behavior in
such a way to complete the task on her own.
The ultimate goal, of course, is to bring the previously unmastered processes of completing a task
into the students’ Zone of Actual Development or ZAD so that they can do the task without help.
Reaching this point requires lots of practice and is a significant learning accomplishment.
22. Schema is a unit of organized knowledge.  It includes how a person thinks and acts when
planning and executing and evaluating performance on a task and its outcomes.
23. Shared reading is all reading that is not individual; this can include paired reading, read-alouds,
literacy circles, small groups, and choral reading.
24. Visual message refers to non-print texts (e.g., cartoons, posters, pictures).
25. Word families are groups of words having similar roots or stems:  --ight, --oon.
26. Word play consists of addressing words through games, rhymes, tongue twisters; any method
that increases students’ awareness of the meaning and value of individual words.
27. Word walls consist of words posted on classroom walls as a means of immersing students in
language.  Students add new words as they come in contact with them.  Word walls can be used
to teach vocabulary, pronunciation, word families, categorization, and spelling.
Delete pages from a pdf reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page in pdf document; copy pages from pdf into new pdf
Delete pages from a pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
add and delete pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf file online
9
FRAMEWORK FOR READING
Decoding
CCoommpprreehheennssiioonn
WWoorrdd  RReeccooggnniittiioonn
SSttrraatteeggiieess
FFlluueennccyy
AAccaaddeemmiicc
LLaanngguuaaggee
CCoommpprreehheennssiioonn
SSttrraatteeggiieess
concepts
about
print
phonemic
awareness
phonics
sight
words
automaticity
background
knowledge
vocabulary
syntax
………...
text
structure
comprehension
monitoring
(re)
organizing
text
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
delete page pdf file; copy page from pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete blank page in pdf online; delete pages from a pdf in preview
10 of 78
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete pages from pdf reader; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
delete pdf pages acrobat; delete pages from pdf in preview
11 of 78
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
cut pages from pdf file; delete pages out of a pdf file
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in ASP.NET. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
delete a page from a pdf file; delete pages pdf preview
12 of 78
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
C:\test1.pdf") Dim pdf2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\test2.pdf") Dim pageindexes = New Integer() {1, 2, 4} Dim pages = pdf.DuplicatePage(pageindexes
delete page pdf; delete page on pdf document
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
delete page pdf file reader; delete pages on pdf online
13 of 78
K-W-L PLUS
Description:  KWL PLUS is designed to foster active reading of expository text.  The basic three-
steps consist of: K – What do I already know?, W – What do I want to know?, and L – What did I
learn?  The “plus” is the extension or connection of the learning.  KWL provides a structure for
activating and building prior knowledge, for eliciting student input when establishing purposes for
reading, and for personalizing the summarization of what was learned. It is a method that students
can use independently and master in various settings. The process mirrors what good readers should
always do. A complete KWL chart can help students reflect and evaluate their learning experience as
well as serve as a useful assessment tool for teachers.  The key to this strategy is using the KWL
organizer.
Step-by-Step
1.  Identify ideas and concepts that students must get from a reading assignment and structure the
lesson to ensure that students are led to an understanding of these points.
2.  Introduce the KWL and model how to use it with a new topic or reading assignment.
3.  Individually, in pairs, or in small groups, students brainstorm what they already know about the
KWL Plus topic. Emphasize the tentative nature of what we remember by encouraging reluctant
students to try to remember what they think they know.
4.  The information is recorded and displayed for the whole class. During class discussion, model
how to organize and categorize information.
5.  Lead the class into the next phase where students generate a list of what else they WANT to learn
or questions they want answered.  Continue to demonstrate how to organize and categorize their
responses and how to use this information to set purposes for their reading.
6.  Students read with the purpose of discovering the information to answer their questions or to
verify their knowledge. They record what they learned in the L column.
7.  Record and display information gained after reading, modeling how to reflect upon the entire
learning experience. 
8.  Encourage students to decide what other information they would like to know about the topic and
discuss why they are interested in this information.
Extensions
The Plus
Change the W to or just add N as a category to let students think about what they need to
Know. Or simply use the need category to let students know what will be tested. 
Add an H – KWHL.  How am I going to Learn (research or investigate)?
Add another L or S – KWLL or KWLS.  What do I Still want to Learn?
Add a U – KWLU.  How can I Use (apply) this information?
14 of 75
What you KNOW
about the topic?
What you WANT to
know about the topic?
What did you LEARN
about the topic?
What did you STILL
want to learn about
the topic?
Topic:
15 of 75
What facts do I
KNOW from the
information in the
problem?
?
Which information, if
any, do I NOT need?
WHAT does the
problem ask me to
find?
What STRATEGY/
operation/tools will I
use to solve the
problem?
16 of 75
CHUNKING THE TEXT
Description:  Chunking the Text provides students with the ability to break the text into shorter,
more manageable units.  This strategy enables students to read with more independence while
reinforcing text organization skills and increasing text opportunities since students are reading shorter
pieces and reflecting upon the content.  Chunking the text begins with teacher modeling and
instruction in determining appropriate “chunking” indicators (i.e., examples, transition words, and
paragraphing) and leads to students’ independently chunking the text.
Step-by-Step
1.  Depending on the text, such as genre, length, structure, and type, determine how a text should be
chunked.
Paragraphs
Stanza
Scene
Section
Chapter
Page
Line
Sentence Segments
Problems (in math & science)
2.  Model the chunking of text by first selecting simple, accessible texts in different genres.
3.  Instruct students using the following sequence:
Examples and justification for when, why, and how to use this strategy.
Model using a text similar to the class reading assignments.
Guide them through an initial practice and evaluate the degree of mastery before moving to an
independent application of the strategy.
Allow students to use the strategy, scaffolding the instruction, until they gain proficiency.
4.  Through various discussion opportunities (small groups/whole class) have students evaluate the
decisions made while utilizing the strategy.  This will encourage them to extend this awareness of
text features as they read.
5.  Extend the strategy by rewriting or making notes after completing a “chunked” text.
Extensions
Encourage reflection of both teaching and reading by engaging in discussion.
Summarize the last section to reinforce instruction of main idea & separating details.
Formulate questions to answer from reading the previous chunk as students read the next
chunk.
Make predictions about chunked texts.
17 of 75
DIRECTED READING AND THINKING ACTIVITY
(DR-TA)
Description:  The DR-TA fosters critical awareness by moving students through a process that
involves prediction, verification, judgement, and ultimately extension of thought. It improves reading
and supports readers at all levels.  The method works well for readers at all grade levels and ability
levels as well as with a range of texts.  It also allows readers to self-assess their level of
understanding prior to continuing or, should the results prove unsatisfactory, returning to the
confusing parts for further clarification. Teachers guide reading and stimulate questions through the
judicious use of questions.
Step-by-Step
1.  The atmosphere created during a DR-TA is paramount in the strategy’s success.  Be supportive
and encouraging so as not to inhibit students’ free participation. When posing open-ended
questions, allow for think time instead of breaking the silence by splitting the question up.  Often
waiting a few more seconds allows students to collect their thoughts and to respond to the
question.
2.  After allowing students to skim the text, make some predictions about its meaning, main
ideas/concepts or other information. Review the title – ask for a prediction and explanation;
continue through headings, graphs, maps, even pull out quotes to activate schema and provide an
orientation to the text.  Never refute any predictions that students make; to do so is comparable to
pulling the rug out from under them.
3.  For informational text, analyze the material for its main and subordinate concepts.  What are the
relevant concepts, ideas, relationships, and information in the assignment? This content analysis
will help determine logical stopping points while directing students through the text. For
narrative text, determine the key elements of the story: the setting and the events in the plot.
Once these elements are identified, decide on logical stopping points within the story. In fiction,
logical stopping points come at key junctures in a causal chain of events in the story line because
the reader should have enough information from at least one preceding event to predict a future
happening or event. The division of text in this manner is known as “chunking the text.”
4.  Have students take notes or use post-it notes to mark information, examples, or evidence in the
text that verifies or refutes their predictions.
5.  Use questions such as the following:
What do you think a story/reading with this title might be about?
What do you expect will happen?
Why do you expect this to happen?
Could it happen in any other way?
Which predictions do you agree/disagree with and why?
6.  Discuss with students their predictions, answers, speculations, assumptions and have them
reference the text for support and proof.  This also serves as a way to promote the value of re-
reading.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested