c# pdf reader itextsharp : Acrobat extract pages from pdf software SDK project winforms wpf web page UWP sumanual_600dpi_a41-part449

Preface
Inthe7years thathave elapsedsincethefirstversionofthis manualwas distributed,there
have been numerous changes in the SU U package. . These e changes have beena resultof both
in-house activities s hereatCWPand, equally y important,tothemany contributions ofcode,
bugfixes, extensions,andsuggestions s fromSUusers outsideof CWP.After reviewing these
manychanges andextensions,andaftermuchdiscussionwithmembersoftheworldwideSU
usercommunity,ithasbecomeapparentthatanewmanualwasnecessary.
ThisnewversionbeganinpreparationforashortcourseonSUattheCREWESprojectat
theUniversityofCalgary. Many y oftheitemsthatwereintheoriginalmanual,suchasinfor-
mationaboutobtainingandinstallingthepackage,havebeenhavebeenmovedtoappendices.
Additional sections describing the core collection of programs have been added. . The e entire
manualhasbeenexpandedtoincludemoredetaileddescriptionsofthecodes.
The intent is s that t you will be e able e to o find your way y around the e package, , via a the help
mechanisms,thatyouwilllearntoruntheprogramsbyrunningthedemos,andfinallywillbe
abletoseehowtobeginwritingSUcode,drawingonthesourcecodeofthepackage.
xi
Acrobat extract pages from pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pdf pages online; delete pages from pdf acrobat
Acrobat extract pages from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from pdf in preview; delete page from pdf document
xii
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Extract hyperlink inside PDF. PDF Write. Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Annotate & Comment. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF
delete blank pages in pdf files; copy pages from pdf into new pdf
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
delete page on pdf reader; delete a page from a pdf in preview
Chapter 1
About SU
In 1987, Jack K. Cohen and Shuki Ronen of the Center for Wave Phenomena (CWP) at the
Colorado School of Mines (CSM) conceived a bold plan. This plan was to create a seismic
processing environment for Unix-based systems, written in the C language, that would extend
the Unix operating system to seismic processingandresearchtasks. Furthermore, they intended
that the package be freely available as full source code to anyone who would want it.
They began with a package called SY, started by Einar Kjartansson while he was a gradu-
ate student at Jon Claerbout’s Stanford Exploration Project (SEP) in the late seventies, and
improved while he was a professor at the University of Utah in the eighties. In 1984 Einar
returned to SEP to baby sit the students (and Jon’s house) while Claerbout went for a summer
vacation. Einar introduced SY to Shuki Ronen, then a graduate student at SEP (a day before
Claerbout returned from vacation and Einar left back to Utah). Ronen further developed SY
from 1984 to 1986. Other students at SEP started to use it and contributed code and ideas.
SY was inspired by much other software developed at SEP and benefited from the foundations
laid by Clarbout and many of his students; Rob Clayton, Stew Levin, Dave Hale, Jeff Thorson,
Chuck Sword, and others who pioneered seismic processing on Unix in the seventies and early
eighties.
In 1986, when Ronen accepted a one year visiting professorship at CSM he was encouraged
by Claerbout to disseminate whatever SEP ideas and software he cared for. In the days before
Internet and ftp, SY was on a 9 track tape in the trunk of the car he drove from California to
Colorado. Ronen went to CSM to replace Jack Cohen who went on sabbatical. Fortunately
for SU, Jack’s sabbatical lasted only two months, instead of the whole year initially planned,
because of the poor health of Jack’s son Dan. Upon Jack’s returnto CWP, he became interested
in SY. This package was a sharp departure from the commercial seismic processing software
that was available at the time. The industry standard at the time was to use Fortran programs
on VAX-VMS based systems.
By the time Cohen and Ronen created the first version of SU in 1987 the sponsors of CWP
had already begun showing interest in the package. The availability of Unix-based workstations
combined with the influx of Unix-literate geophysicists from the major academic institutions,
shifted the industry to using primarily Unix-based systems for research and for processing,
increasing the interest in Unix-based software, including SU.
Until September of 1992, SU was used primarily in-house at CWP. Earlier versions of SU
had been ported to CWP sponsor companies, even providing the basis for in-house seismic pro-
cessing packages developed by some of those companies! Once SU became generally available
1
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
delete a page from a pdf; cut pages out of pdf file
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
delete pages in pdf online; delete pages from pdf
2
CHAPTER 1. ABOUT SU
on the Internet, it began to be used by a much broader community. The package is used by
exploration geophysicists, earthquake seismologists, environmental engineers, software develop-
ers and others. It is used by scientific staff in both small geotechnical companies and major
oil and gas companies, and by academics and government researchers, both as a seismic data
processing and software development environment.
1.1 What SU is
The SU package is free software, meaning that you may have unrestricted use of the codes for
both processing and software development, provided that you honor the license that appears
at the beginning of this manual and as the file LEGAL
STATEMENT in the current release
of the package. (This latter file takes precedence). The package is maintained and expanded
periodically, with each new release appearing at 3 to 6 month intervals, depending on changes
that accumulate in the official version here at CWP. The package is distributed with the full
source code, so that users can alter and extend its capabilities. The philosophy behind the
package is to provide both a free processing and development environment in a proven structure
that can be maintained and expanded to suit the needs of a variety of users.
The package is not necessarily restricted to seismic processing tasks, however. A broad
suite of wave-related processing can be done with SU, making it a somewhat more general
package than the word “seismic” implies. SU is intended as an extension of the Unix operating
system, and therefore shares many characteristics of the Unix, including Unix flexibility and
expandibility. The fundamental Unix philosophy is that all operating system commands are
programs run under that operating system. The idea is that individual tasks be identified, and
that small programs be written to do those tasks, and those tasks alone. The commands may
have options that permit variations on those tasks, but the fundamental idea is one-program,
one-task. Because Unix is a multi-tasking operating system, multiple processes may be strung
together in a cascade via “pipes” (|).
This decentralization has the advantage of minimizing overhead by not launching single
“monster” applications that try to do everything, as is seen in Microsoft applications, or in
some commercial seismic utilities, for example.
Unix has the added feature of supporting a variety of shell languages, making Unix, itself,
ameta-language. Seismic Unix benefits from all of these attributes as well. In combination
with standard Unix programs, Seismic Unix programs may be used in shell scripts to extend
the functionality of the package.
Of course, it may be that no Unix or Seismic Unix program will fulfill a specific task. This
means that new code has to be written. The availability of a standard set of source code,
designed to be readable by human beings, can expedite the process of extending the package
through the addition of new source code.
1.2 What SU is not
The SU package is not a graphical user interface driven utility at this time, though there
are several possibilities including Java and TCL/TK scripts, which may be exploited for this
purpose in the future. Because most commercial seismic processing packages are GUI-based, it
is unavoidable that users will expect SU to be similar to these packages. However, this is not
afair comparison, for several reasons.
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
cut pages from pdf reader; cut pages from pdf file
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat. VB example code to create graphics watermark on multiple PDF pages within the
delete pages from a pdf in preview; delete page pdf file
1.3. OBTAINING AND INSTALLING SU
3
As mentioned above, SU is an extension of the Unix operating system. Just as there are no
GUI driven Unix operating systems that give full access to all of the capabilities of Unix from
menus, it is not reasonable to expect full access to Seismic Unix through such an interface. At
most, any SU interface will give limited access to the capabilities of the package.
SU is not a replacement for commercial seismic packages. Commercial seismic software
packages are industrial-strength utilities designed for the express purpose of production-level
seismic processing. If you do commercial-level processing, and have dedicated, or plan to
dedicate funds to purchase one or more license of such commercial software, then it is unlikely
that you will be able to substitute SU for the commercial utility.
However, SU can be an important adjunct to any commercial package you use. Where
commercial packages are used for production work, SU often has found a place as a proto-
typing package. Also, if new code needs to be written, SU can provide a starting base for
new software applications. Indeed, the availability of seismic processing capability may encour-
age non-processors to experiment with processing, non-software-developers to experiment with
software development, and non-researchers to engage in research.
SU is not confined to seismic applications. It may find use, both in geophysical and more
general signal processing applications. It certainly can be useful for teaching students about
“wave related” signal processing and, particularly, Fourier transform properties. This can
include radar, non-seismic acoustics, and image processing, just to name a few.
Another thing that SU is not, at least in its current version, is a 3D package. However, it
is not, expressly a 2D package, either, as there are numerous filtering and trace manipulation
tasks that are the same in 2D as in 3D. It is likely, however, that there will be 3D applications
in future releases of SU. A single 3D migration code appeared first in Release 32, which will
hopefully set the stage for new developments.
1.3 Obtaining and Installing SU
Because the coding standards of SU stress portability, the package will install on any system
that is running some form of the Unix operating system, and has a decent version of “make”
and an ANSI C compiler. The programs GNU Make and GCC may be substituted for these
respective programs on most systems.
1
New releases of SU are issued at 3 to 6 month intervals, depending upon the accumulation
of changes in the home version at CWP. Old releases are not supported. However, if materials
appear to break between releases, please contact me (John Stockwell) by email so that we can
fix the problem.
Instructions for obtaining and installing SU may be found in Appendix A of this manual.
1
Remarkably,asoftware packagecalled CYGWIN32, recently released bytheGNU project, provides enough
Unix-like functionality, so that SU may be ported to Windows NT, with no changes to the SU source code or
Makefiles!
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
delete page from pdf acrobat; delete pdf pages in preview
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
as a kind of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS on slide with no more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe
delete page on pdf; delete page pdf
4
CHAPTER 1. ABOUT SU
DICOM to PDF Converter | Convert DICOM to PDF, Convert PDF to
users do not need to load Adobe Acrobat or any Convert all pages or certain pages chosen by users; download & perpetual update. Start Image DICOM PDF Converting.
delete page in pdf online; delete pages out of a pdf file
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
for Adobe Acrobat Reader & print driver during conversion; Support conversion of Bitmap - PDF files in both single & batch mode; Convert all pages or certain
copy pages from pdf to another pdf; delete page on pdf document
Chapter 2
Help facilities
Like the Unix operating system, Seismic Unix may be thought of as a language (or meta-
language). As with any language, a certain amount of vocabulary must be mastered before
useful operations may be performed. Because the SU contains many programs, there must
be a “dictionary” to permit the inevitable questions about vocabulary can be answered. It is
intended that this manual be the beginning of such a dictionary.
SU does not have “man pages,” in the same way that Unix does, but it does have equiv-
alent internal documentation mechanisms. There is a general level help utilities which give
an overview of what is available. For information about specific aspects of a particular code,
the majority of the programs contain a selfdoc—a self-documentation paragraph, which will
appear when the name of the program is typed on the commandline, with no options.
(In all of the examples that follow, the percent sign “%” indicates a Unix commandline
prompt, and is not typed as part of the command.)
The following tools provide internal documentation at various levels of detail for the main
programs, shell scripts, and library functions in the package:
• SUHELP - list the CWP/SU programs and shells
• SUNAME - get name line from self-docs and location of the source code
• The selfdoc - is an internaldocumentation utility whichexists inthemajority ofexecutable
mains and shell scripts. The selfdoc is seen by typing the name of the program or shell
script on the commandline with no arguments, and without redirection of input or output
via pipes | or Unix redirects > <, For non-executables (library routines) and for programs
without the selfdoc feature, there is a dummy selfdoc included which provides a database
of information about those items, as well,
• SUDOC - get DOC listing for code
• SUFIND - get info from self-docs
• GENDOCS - generate complete list of selfdocs in latex form
• suhelp.html - is an HTML global overview of SU programs by subject matter,
• SUKEYWORD – guide to SU keywords in segy.h
This chapter discusses each of these utilities, with the intent of showing the reader how to
get from the most general to the most specific information about SU programs.
5
6
CHAPTER 2. HELP FACILITIES
2.1 SUHELP - List the Executable Programs and Shell Scripts
For a general listing of the contents of SU, which includes each executable (that is, each main
program and shell script) in the package type:
% suhelp
CWP PROGRAMS: (no self-documentation)
ctrlstrip
fcat
maxints
t
downfort
isatty
pause
upfort
PAR PROGRAMS: (programs with self-documentation)
a2b
kaperture
resamp
transp
vtlvz
b2a
makevel
smooth2
unif2
wkbj
farith
mkparfile
smoothint2
unisam
ftnstrip
prplot
subset
unisam2
h2b
recast
swapbytes
velconv
press return key to continue
....
Please type suhelp or see Appendix B for the full text.
Another useful command sequence is:
% suhelp | lpr
which will the output from suhelp to the local print.
2.2 SUNAME - Lists the Name and Short Description of Every
Item in SU
Amore complete listing of the contents of the CWP/SU package may be obtained by typing
% suname
----- CWP Free Programs -----
CWPROOT=/usr/local/cwp
Mains:
In CWPROOT/src/cwp/main:
* CTRLSTRIP - Strip non-graphic characters
* DOWNFORT - change Fortran programs to lower case, preserving strings
* FCAT - fast cat with 1 read per file
* ISATTY - pass on return from isatty(2)
* MAXINTS - Compute maximum and minimum sizes for integer types
* PAUSE - prompt and wait for user signal to continue
* T - time and date for non-military types
* UPFORT - change Fortran programs to upper case, preserving strings
In CWPROOT/src/par/main:
2.3. THE SELFDOC - PROGRAM SELF-DOCUMENTATION
7
A2B - convert ascii floats to binary
B2A - convert binary floats to ascii
DZDV - determine depth derivative with respect to the velocity ",
FARITH - File ARITHmetic -- perform simple arithmetic with binary files
FTNSTRIP - convert a file of floats plus record delimiters created
H2B - convert 8 bit hexidecimal floats to binary
KAPERTURE - generate the k domain of a line scatterer for a seismic array
MAKEVEL - MAKE a VELocity function v(x,y,z)
MKPARFILE - convert ascii to par file format
PRPLOT - PRinter PLOT of 1-D arrays f(x1) from a 2-D function f(x1,x2)
RAYT2D - traveltime Tables calculated by 2D paraxial RAY tracing
RECAST - RECAST data type (convert from one data type to another)
REGRID3 - REwrite a [ni3][ni2][ni1] GRID to a [no3][no2][no1] 3-D grid
RESAMP - RESAMPle the 1st dimension of a 2-dimensional function f(x1,x2)
...
Please type: suhelp or see Appendix B for the full text.
2.3 The Selfdoc - Program Self-Documentation
There are no Unix man pages for SU. To some people that seems to be a surprise (even
a disappointment) as this would seem to be a standard Unix feature, which Seismic Unix
should emulate. The package does contain an equivalent mechanism called a selfdoc or self-
documentation feature.
This is a paragraph that is written into every program, and arranged so that if the name
of the program is typed on the commandline of a Unix terminal window, with no options or
redirects to or from files, the paragraph is printed to standard error (the screen).
For example:
% sustack
SUSTACK - stack adjacent traces having the same key header word
sustack <input >output [Optional parameters]
Required parameters:
none
Optional parameters:
key=cdp
header key word to stack on
normpow=1.0
each sample is divided by the
normpow’th number of non-zero values
stacked (normpow=0 selects no division)
verbose=0
verbose = 1 echos information
Note: The offset field is set to zero on the output traces.
Sushw can be used afterwards if this is not acceptable.
The first line indicates the name of the program sustack and a short description of what
the program does. This is the same line that appears for the listing of sustack in the suname
listing. The second line
8
CHAPTER 2. HELP FACILITIES
sustack <stdin >stdin [Optional parameters]
indicates how the program is to be typed on the commandline, with the words “stdin” and
“stdout” indicating that the input is from the standard input and standard output, respectively.
What this means in Unix terms is that the user could be inputting and outputting data via
diskfiles or the Unix “redirect in” < and “redirect out” > symbols, or via pipes |.
The paragraphs labeled by “Required parameters:” and “Optional parameters” indicate
the commandline parameters which are required for the operation of the program, and those
which are optional. The default values of the Optional parameters are given via the equality
are the values that the program assumes for these parameters when data are supplied, with no
additional commandline arguments given. For example: “key=cdp” indicates that sustack will
stack over the common depth point gather number field, “cdp.” (The shell script sukeyword
tells the choices of keyword that are available.)
2.4 SUDOC - List the Full Online Documentation of any Item
in SU
As has been alluded to in previous sections of this manual, there is a database of selfdocumen-
tation items that is available for each main program, shell script, and library function. This
database exists in the directory $CWPROOT/src/doc and is composed of all of the selfdocu-
mentation paragraphs of all of the items in SU.
Because not all all items with selfdocs are executable, an additional mechanism is nec-
essary to see the selfdoc for these items. For example, information about the Abel trans-
form routines, located in $CWPROOT/src/cwp/lib/abel.c (on the system at CWP, CWP-
ROOT=/usr/local/cwp) is obtained via
% sudoc abel
In /usr/local/cwp/src/cwp/lib:
ABEL - Functions to compute the discrete ABEL transform:
abelalloc allocate and return a pointer to an Abel transformer
abelfree free an Abel transformer
abel compute the Abel transform
Function prototypes:
void *abelalloc (int n);
void abelfree (void *at);
void abel (void *at, float f[], float g[]);
Input:
ns number of samples in the data to be transformed
f[] array of floats, the function being transformed
Output:
at pointer to Abel transformer returned by abelalloc(int n)
g[] array of floats, the transformed data returned by
abel(*at,f[],g[])
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested