c# pdf reader itextsharp : Delete a page from a pdf without acrobat SDK control API .net azure windows sharepoint sumanual_600dpi_a48-part461

Chapter6
SeismicModelingUtilities
Animportantaspectofseismicexplorationandresearchareprogramsforcreatingsyntheticdata.Such
programsfindtheiruse,bothinthepracticalproblemofmodelingrealdata,aswellasinthetestingof
newprocessingprograms. Aprocessingprogramthatwillnotworkonidealizedmodeldatawilllikely
notworkonrealseismicdata.
Anotherimportantaspectofmodelingprogramsisthefactthatmanyseismicprocessingalgorithms
(suchasmigration)maybeviewedasinverseprocesses. Thefirststepinsuchaninverseproblemmay
be tocreate amethod d tosolvethe e forwardproblem, andthenformulate the solution n totheinverse
problemasa“backpropagation”oftherecordeddatatoitspositioninthesubsurface.
Therearetwopartstotheseismicmodelingtask. Thefirstpartistheconstructionofbackground
wavespeedprofiles,whichmayconsistofuniformlysampledarraysoffloatingpointnumbers.Thesecond
partistheconstructionofthesyntheticwaveinformationwhichpropagatesinthatwavespeedprofile.
Becauseoftheintimaterelationshipbetweenseismicmodelingandseismicprocessing,background
wavespeedprofilescreatedformodellingtasks,mayalsobeusefulforprocessingtasks.
Of course, if some e simple e assumptions are made, it may be possible for background d wavespeed
informationtobebuiltintothemodelingprogram.
6.1 BackgroundWavespeedProfiles
Therearemanyapproachestocreatingbackgroundwavespeedprofiles. Formanyprocesses,itmaybe
thatasimplearrayoffloatingpointnumbers,eachrepresentingthewavespeed,slowness(1/wavespeed),
orsloth(slownesssquared)onauniformlysampledgridwillbesufficient.
However, more advancedtechniques s may involvewavespeedprofile generationintriangulatedor
tetrahedrizedmedia.
6.2 UniformlySampledModels
InSeismicUnixthereareseveralprogramswhichmaybeusedtogeneratebackgroundwavespeedprofile
data.Often,suchdataneedtobesmoothed.
Theseprogramsare:
• UNISAM-UNIformlySAMpleafunctiony(x)specifiedasx,ypair
• UNISAM2-UNIformlySAMplea2-Dfunctionf(x1,x2)
• MAKEVEL-MAKEaVELocityfunctionv(x,y,z)
• UNIF2-generatea2-DUNIFormlysampledvelocityprofilefromalayeredmodel.Ineachlayer,
velocityisalinearfunctionofposition.
69
Delete a page from a pdf without acrobat - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
copy page from pdf; cut pages out of pdf file
Delete a page from a pdf without acrobat - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from pdf reader; delete page from pdf
70
CHAPTER 6. SEISMIC MODELING UTILITIES
• SMOOTHINT2 - SMOOTH non-uniformly sampled INTerfaces, via the damped least-squares
technique
• SMOOTH2 - SMOOTH a uniformly sampled 2d array of data, within a user- defined window, via
adamped least squares technique
• SMOOTH3D - 3D grid velocity SMOOTHing by the damped least squares
Please see the selfdoc of each of these programs for further information. Also see the demos in
$CWPROOT/src/Velocity
Profiles
6.3 Synthetic Data Generators
There are a numberofprogramsforgenerating synthetic seismic and seismic-like data in the SU package.
These are
• SUPLANE - create common offset data file with up to 3 planes
• SUSPIKE - make a small spike data set
• SUIMP2D - generate shot records for a line scatterer embedded in three dimensions using the
Born integral equation
• SUIMP3D - generate inplane shot records for a point scatterer embedded in three dimensions
using the Born integral equation
• SUFDMOD2 - Finite-Difference MODeling (2nd order) for acoustic wave equation
• SUSYNCZ - SYNthetic seismograms for piecewise constant V(Z) function True amplitude (pri-
maries only) modeling for 2.5D
• SUSYNLV - SYNthetic seismograms for Linear Velocity function
• SUSYNVXZ - SYNthetic seismograms of common offset V(X,Z) media via Kirchhoff-style model-
ing
• SUSYNLVCW - SYNthetic seismograms for Linear Velocity function for mode Converted Waves
• SUSYNVXZCS - SYNthetic seismograms of common shot in V(X,Z) media via Kirchhoff-style
modeling
Of these, onlysufdmod2, susynvxz, andsysnvxzcsrequirean file ofinputwavespeed. The otherprograms
use commandline arguments for wavespeed model input.
Please see the demos in $CWPROOT/src/demos/Synthetic for further information. Also, a number
of the other demos use these programs for synthetic data generation.
6.4 Delaunay Triangulation
More sophisticated methods of synthetic data generation use assumptions regarding the nature of the
medium (as represented by the input wavespeed profile data format) to expedite computations of the
synthetic data. One such method is triangulation via the Delaunay method.
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other image or document, or from PDF document to other file formats, like multi-page TIFF file
delete pdf pages in preview; delete pdf pages in reader
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
standard PowerPoint documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other PowerPoint to PDF Conversion. This page will tell you how to use XDoc
delete a page from a pdf without acrobat; delete pages from pdf in preview
6.5. TETRAHEDRAL METHODS
71
6.4.1 Triangulated Model Building
There are two way of making triangulated models. The first is to explicitly input boundary coordinates
and wavespeed (actually sloth values) with “trimodel.” The second is to make a uniformly sampled
model, perhaps with one of the model building utilities above, and then use “uni2tri” to convert the uni-
formly sampled model to a triangulated model. (Please note, that this will work better if the wavespeed
model is smoothed, prior to conversion.) These programs are
• TRIMODEL - make a triangulated sloth (1/velocity squared) model
• UNI2TRI - convert UNIformly sampled model to a TRIangulated model
• TRI2UNI - convert a TRIangulated model to UNIformly sampled model
6.4.2 Synthetic Seismic Data in Triangulated Media
Several programs make use of triangulated models to create ray tracing, or ray-trace based synthetic
seismograms. There is also a code to create Gaussian beam synthetic seismograms in a triangulated
medium. These programs are:
• NORMRAY - dynamic ray tracing for normal incidence rays in a sloth model
• TRIRAY - dynamic RAY tracing for a TRIangulated sloth model
• GBBEAM - Gaussian beam synthetic seismograms for a sloth model
• TRISEIS - Synthetic seismograms for a sloth model
There is a comprehensive set of demos located in the directory $CWPROOT/src/Synthetic/Tri and
$CWPROOT/src/Synthetic/Trielas
6.5 Tetrahedral Methods
Some new functionality will be entering SU in future releases for tetrahedral model building and ray
tracing in tetrahedral models. One code that is in the current release is
• TETRAMOD - TETRAhedron MODel builder. In each layer, velocity gradient is constant or a
2-D grid; horizons could be a uniform grid and/or added by a 2-D grid specified.
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
standard Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other Word to PDF Conversion. This page will tell you how to use XDoc.Word SDK
cut pages from pdf online; delete page from pdf online
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
standard Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other Excel to PDF Conversion. This page will tell you how to use XDoc.Excel
delete blank pages in pdf; acrobat remove pages from pdf
72
CHAPTER 6. SEISMIC MODELING UTILITIES
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
delete pages from a pdf online; delete pages pdf online
Chapter 7
Seismic Processing Utilities
There are a collection of operations which are uniquely seismic in nature, representing operations which
are designed to perform some aspect of the involved process which takes seismic data and converts it
into images of the earth.
• stacking data,
• picking data,
• velocity analysis,
• normal moveout correction,
• dip moveout correction,
• seismic migration and related operations.
7.1 SUSTACK, SURECIP, SUDIVSTACK - Stacking Data
• SUSTACK - stack adjacent traces having the same key header word,
• SURECIP - sum opposing offsets in prepared data,
• SUDIVSTACK - Diversity Stacking using either average power or peak power within windows
7.2 SUVELAN, SUNMO - Velocity Analysis and Normal Move-
out Correction
• SUVELAN - compute stacking velocity semblance for cdp gathers
• SUNMO - NMO for an arbitrary velocity function of time and CDP
Please see the demos in $CWPROOT/src/demos/Velocity
Analysisand $CWPROOT/src/demos/NMO
for further information.
7.3 SUDMOFK, SUDMOTX, SUDMOVZ - Dip Moveout Cor-
rection
Dip-moveout is a data transformation which converts data recorded with offset to zero offset data. The
following programs
73
74
CHAPTER 7. SEISMIC PROCESSING UTILITIES
• SUDMOFK - DMO via F-K domain (log-stretch) method for common-offset gathers
• SUDMOTX - DMO via T-X domain (Kirchhoff) method for common-offset gathers
• SUDMOVZ - DMO for V(Z) media for common-offset gathers
perform this operation.
7.4 Seismic Migration
The subject of seismic migration is one of the most varied in seismic data processing. Many algorthms
have been developed to perform this task. Methods include Kirchhoff, Stolt, Finite-Difference, Fourier
Finite-Difference, and several types of Phase-Shift or Gazdag Migration.
Please see the demos in $CWPROOT/src/demos/Migration for further information.
7.4.1 SUGAZMIG, SUMIGPS, SUMIGPSPI, SUMIGSPLIT - Phase Shift
Migration
• SUGAZMIG - SU version of Jeno GAZDAG’s phase-shift migration for zero-offset data.
• SUMIGPS - MIGration by Phase Shift with turning rays
• SUMIGPSPI - Gazdag’s phase-shift plus interpolation migration for zero-offset data, which can
handle the lateral velocity variation.
• SUMIGSPLIT - Split-step depth migration for zero-offset data.
7.4.2 SUKDMIG2D, SUMIGTOPO2D, SUDATUMK2DR, SUDATUMK2DS
-2D Kirchhoff Migration, and Datuming
• SUKDMIG2D - Kirchhoff Depth Migration of 2D poststack/prestack data
• SUDATUMK2DR - Kirchhoff datuming of receivers for 2D prestack data (shot gathers are the
input)
• SUDATUMK2DS - Kirchhoff datuming of sources for 2D prestack data (input data are receiver
gathers)
• SUMIGTOPO2D - Kirchhoff Depth Migration of 2D postack/prestack data from the (variable
topography) recording surface
7.4.3 SUMIGFD, SUMIGFFD - Finite-Difference Migration
• SUMIGFD - 45 and 60 degree Finite difference migration for zero-offset data.
• SUMIGFFD - Fourier finite difference migration for zero-offset data. This method is a hybrid
migration which combines the advantages of phase shift and finite difference migrations.
7.4.4 SUMIGTK - Time-Wavenumber Domain Migration
This algorthm was created by Dave Hale “on the fly” and, as far as we know, exists nowhere in else
geophysical literature.
• SUMIGTK - MIGration via T-K domain method for common-midpoint stacked data
7.4.5 SUSTOLT - Stolt Migration
This is the classic F-K migration method of Clayton Stolt.
• SUSTOLT - Stolt migration for stacked data or common-offset gathers
Chapter 8
Processing Flows with SU
8.1 SU and UNIX
You need not learn a special seismic language to use SU. If you know how to use UNIX shell-redirecting
and pipes, you are ready to start using SU—the seismic commands and options can be used just as you
would use the built-in UNIX commands. In particular, you can write ordinary UNIX shell scripts to
combine frequent command combinations into meta-commands (i.e., processing flows). These scripts
can be thought of as “job files.”
Table 8.1: UNIX Symbols
process1 < file1
process1 takes input from file1
process2 > file2
process2 writes on (new) file2
process3 >> file3
process3 appends to file3
process4 | process5
output of process4 is input to process5
process6 << text
take input from following lines
So let’s begin with a capsule review of the basic UNIX operators as summarized in Table 8.1. The
symbols <, >, and >> are known as “redirection operators,” since they redirect input and output into
or out of the command (i.e., process). The symbol | is called a “pipe,” since we can picture data flowing
from one process to another through the “pipe.” Here is a simple SU “pipeline” with input “indata”
and output “outdata”:
sufilter f=4,8,42,54 <indata |
sugain tpow=2.0 >outdata
This example shows a band-limiting operation being “piped” into a gaining operation. The input data
set indata is directed into the program sufilter with the < operator, and similarly, the output data set
outdata receives the data because of the > operator. The output of sufilter is connected to the input
of sugain by use of the | operator.
The strings with the = signs illustrate how parameters are passed to SU programs. The program
sugain receives the assigned value 2.0 to its parameter tpow, while the program sufilter receives the
assigned four component vector to its parameterf. To find out what the valid parametersare fora given
program, we use the self-doc facility.
By the way, space around the UNIX redirection and pipe symbols is optional—the example shows
one popular style. On the other hand, spaces around the = operator are not permitted.
The first four symbols in Table 8.1 are the basic grammar of UNIX; the final << entry is the symbol
for the less commonly used “here document” redirection. Despite its rarity in interactive use, SU shell
programsare significantlyenhanced byappropriate use ofthe <<operator—we will illustrate this below.
75
76
CHAPTER 8. PROCESSING FLOWS WITH SU
Many built-in UNIX commands do not have a self-documentation facility like SU’s—instead, most
do have “man” pages. For example,
% man cat
CAT(1)
UNIX Programmer’s Manual
CAT(1)
NAME
cat - catenate and print
SYNOPSIS
cat [ -u ] [ -n ] [ -s ] [ -v ] file ...
DESCRIPTION
Cat reads each file in sequence and displays it on the stan-
dard output. Thus
cat file
displays the file on the standard output, and
cat file1 file2 >file3
--More--
You need to know a bit more UNIX lore to use SU efficiently—we’ll introduce these tricks of the trade
in the context of the examples discussed later in this chapter.
8.2 Understanding and using SU shell programs
The essence of good SU usage is constructing (or cloning!) UNIX shell programs to create and record
processing flows. In this section, we give some annotated examples to get you started.
8.2.1 A simple SU processing flow example
Most SU programs read from standard input and write to standard output. Therefore, one can build
complex processing flows by simply connecting SU programs with UNIX pipes. Most flows will end
with one of the SU plotting programs. Because typical processing flows are lengthy and involve many
parameter settings, it is convenient to put the SU commands in a shell file.
Remark: All the UNIX shells, Bourne (sh), Cshell (csh), Korn (ksh), ..., include a programming
language. In this document, we exclusively use the Bourne shell programming language.
Our first example is a simple shell program called Plot. The numbers in square brackets at the end
of the lines in the following listing are not part of the shell program—we added them as keys to the
discussion that follows the listing.
#! /bin/sh
[1]
# Plot:
Plot a range of cmp gathers
# Author: Jane Doe
# Usage: Plot cdpmin cdpmax
data=$HOME/data/cmgs
[2]
8.2. UNDERSTANDING AND USING SU SHELL PROGRAMS
77
# Plot the cmp gather.
suwind <$data key=cdp min=$1 max=$2 |
[3]
sugain tpow=2 gpow=.5 |
suximage f2=0 d2=1 \
[4]
label1="Time (sec)" label2="Trace number" \
title="CMP Gathers $1 to $2" \
perc=99 grid1=solid &
[5]
Discussion of numbered lines:
1. The symbol #isthe commentsymbol—anything on the remainderofthe line isnotexecutedby the
UNIX shell. The combination #!is an exception to this rule: the shell uses the file name following
this symbol as a path to the program that is to execute the remainder of the shell program.
2. The author apparently intends that the shell be edited if it is necessary to change the data set—
she made this easier to do by introducing the shell variable data and assigning to it the full
pathname of the data file. The assigned value of this parameter is accessed as $data within the
shell program. The parameter $HOME appearing as the first component of the file path name is
aUNIX maintained environment variable containing the path of the user’s home directory. In
general, there is no need for the data to be located in the user’s home directory, but the user
would need “read permission” on the data file for the shell program to succeed.
WARNING! Spaces are significant to the UNIX shell—it uses them to parse command lines. So
despite all we’ve learned about making code easy to read, do not put spaces next to the = symbol.
(Somewhere around 1977, one author’s(Jack) first attempt to learn UNIX was derailed for several
weeks by making this mistake.)
3. The main pipeline of this shell code selects a certain set of cmp gathers with suwind, gains this
subset with sugain and pipes the result into the plotting program suximage. As indicated in
the Usage comment, the cmp range is specified by command line arguments. Within the shell
program, these arguments are referenced as $1, $2 (i.e., first argument, second argument).
4. The lines within the suximage command are continued by the backslash escape character.
WARNING! The line continuation backslash must be the final characteron the line—an invisible
space or tab following the backslash is one of the most common and frustrating bugs in UNIX
shell programming.
5. The final & in the shell program puts the plot window into “background” so we can continue
working in our main window. This is the X-Windows usage—the & should not be used with the
analogous PostScriptplotting programs (e.g., supsimage). For example, with supsimage in place
of suximage, the & might be replaced by | lpr.
The SU plotting programs are special—their self-doc doesn’t show all the parameters accepted.
For example, most of the parameters accepted by suximage are actually specified in the self-
documentation for the generic CWP plotting program ximage. This apparent flaw in the self-
documentation is actually a side effect ofa key SU design decision. The SUgraphics programs call
on the generic plotting programs to do the actual plotting. The alternative design was to have
tuned graphics programs for various seismic applications. Our design choice keeps things simple,
but it implies a basic limitation in SU’s graphical capabilities.
The plotting programs are the vehicle for presenting your results. Therefore you should take
the time to carefully look through the self-documentation for both the “SU jacket” programs
(suximage, suxwigb, ...) and the generic plotting programs (ximage, xwigb, ...).
78
CHAPTER 8. PROCESSING FLOWS WITH SU
8.2.2 Executing shell programs
The simplest way to execute a UNIX shell program is to give it “execute permission.” For example, to
make our above Plot shell program executable:
chmod +x Plot
Then to execute the shell program:
Plot 601 610
Here we assume that the parameters cdpmin=601, cdpmax=610 are appropriate values for the cmgs data
set. Figure 8.1 shows an output generated by the Plot shell program.
0
1
2
3
4
5
Time (sec)
0
100
200
Trace number
CMP Gathers 601 to 610
Figure 8.1: Output of the Plot shell program.
8.2.3 A typical SU processing flow
Suppose you want to use sudmofk. You’ve read the self-doc, but a detailed example is always welcome
isn’t it? The place to look is the directory su/examples. In this case, we are lucky and find the shell
program, Dmo. Again, the numbers in square brackets at the end of the lines shown below are not part
of the listing.
#! /bin/sh
# dmo
set -x
[1]
# set parameters
input=cdp201to800
[2]
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested