c# pdf reader itextsharp : Cut pages from pdf preview software SDK project winforms .net html UWP Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi1-part475

x
CONTENTS
18.5 DC Transformer Section 18.6 Synchronized Compound Regulators
18.7 Compound Regulators with Secondary Post Regulators 18.8 Problems
19. DUTY-RATIO-CONTROLLED PUSH-PULL CONVERTERS
2.151
19.1 Introduction 19.2 Operating Principles 19.3 Snubber Components
19.4 Staircase Saturation in Push-Pull Converters 19.5 Flux Density 
Balancing 19.6  Push-Pull Transformer Design (General Considerations)
19.7  Flux Doubling 19.8  Push-Pull Transformer Design Example
19.9 Problems
20. DC-TO-DC SWITCHING REGULATORS
2.163
20.1 Introduction 20.2 Operating Principles 20.3 Control and Drive
Circuits 20.4 Inductor Design for Switching Regulators 20.5 Inductor
Design Example 20.6 General Performance Parameters 20.7 The Ripple 
Regulator 20.8 Problems
21. HIGH-FREQUENCY SATURABLE REACTOR POWER REGULATOR
(MAGNETIC DUTY RATIO CONTROL)
2.177
21.1 Introduction 21.2 Operating Principles 21.3 The Saturable Reactor 
Power Regulator Principle 21.4 The Saturable Reactor Power Regulator 
Application 21.5 Saturable Reactor Quality Factors 21.6 Selecting Suitable 
Core Materials 21.7 Controlling the Saturable Reactor 21.8 Current 
Limiting the Saturable Reactor Regulator 21.9 Push-Pull Saturable Reactor 
Secondary Power Control Circuit 21.10 Some Advantages of the Saturable 
Reactor Regulator 21.11 Some Limiting Factors in Saturable Reactor 
Regulators 21.12 The Case for Constant-Voltage or Constant-Current 
Reset (High-Frequency Instability Considerations) 21.13 Saturable Reactor 
Design 21.14 Design Example 21.15 Problems
22. CONSTANT-CURRENT POWER SUPPLIES
2.193
22.1 Introduction 22.2 Constant-Voltage Supplies 22.3 Constant-Current 
Supplies 22.4 Compliance Voltage 22.5 Problems
23. VARIABLE LINEAR POWER SUPPLIES
2.197
23.1 Introduction 23.2 Basic Operation (Power Section) 23.3 Drive Circuit
23.4 Maximum Transistor Dissipation 23.5 Distribution of Power Losses
23.6 Voltage Control and Current Limit Circuit 23.7 Control Circuit
23.8 Problems
24. SWITCHMODE VARIABLE POWER SUPPLIES
2.207
24.1 Introduction 24.2 Variable Switchmode Techniques 24.3 Special
Properties of Flyback Converters 24.4 Operating Principles 24.5 Practical 
Limiting Factors 24.6 Practical Design Compromises 24.7 InitialConditions
24.8 The Diagonal Half Bridge 24.9 Block Schematic Diagram (General 
Description) 24.10 Overall System Operating Principles 24.11 Individual Block 
Functions 24.12 Primary Power Limiting 24.13 Conclusions
Cut pages from pdf preview - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page pdf file; delete pdf pages ipad
Cut pages from pdf preview - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page in pdf; delete pages from pdf document
CONTENTS
xi
25. SWITCHMODE VARIABLE POWER SUPPLYTRANSFORMER DESIGN
2.223
25.1 Design Steps 25.2 Variable-Frequency Mode 25.3 Problems
PART 3  APPLIED DESIGN
1. INDUCTORSAND CHOKES IN SWITCHMODE SUPPLIES
3.3
1.1 Introduction 1.2 Simple Inductors 1.3 Common-Mode Line-Filter 
Inductors 1.4 Design Example of a Common-Mode Line-Filter Inductor (Using 
a Ferrite E Core and Graphical Design Method) 1.5 Calculating Inductance (for 
Common-Mode Inductors Wound on Ferrite E Cores) 1.6 Series-Mode Line-Input-
Filter Inductors 1.7 Chokes (Inductors with DC Bias) 1.8 Design Example of a
Gapped Ferrite E-Core Choke (Using an Empirical Method) 1.9 Design Example
of Chokes for Buck and Boost Converters (by Area Product Graphical Methods
and by Calculation) 1.10 Choke Design Example for a Buck Regulator (Using a 
Ferrite E Core and Graphical AP Design Method) 1.11 Ferrite and Iron Powder 
Rod Chokes 1.12 Problems
2. HIGH-CURRENT CHOKES USING IRON POWDER CORES
3.29
2.1 Introduction 2.2 Energy Storage Chokes 2.3 Core Permeability
2.4 Gapping Iron Powder E Cores 2.5 Methods Used to Design Iron Powder 
E-Core Chokes (Graphical Area Product Method) 2.6 Example of Iron Powder 
E-Core Choke Design (Using the Graphical Area Product Method)
3. CHOKE DESIGN USING IRON POWDERTOROIDAL CORES
3.41
3.1 Introduction 3.2 Preferred Design Approach (Toroids) 3.3 Swinging
Chokes 3.4 Winding Options 3.5 Design Example (Option A) 3.6 Design
Example (Option B) 3.7 Design Example (Option C) 3.8 Core Loss 3.9 Total 
Dissipation and Temperature Rise 3.10 Linear (Toroidal) Choke Design
Appendix 3.A,  Derivation of Area Product Equations
Appendix 3.B, Derivation of Packing and Resistance Factors
Appendix 3.C, Derivation of Nomogram 3.3.1
4. SWITCHMODETRANSFORMER DESIGN (GENERAL PRINCIPLES)
3.63
4.1 Introduction 4.2 Transformer Size (General Considerations) 4.3 Optimum
Efficiency 4.4 Optimum Core Size and Flux Density Swing 4.5 Calculating Core
Size in Terms of Area Product 4.6 Primary Area Factor K
p
4.7 Winding Packing 
Factor 4.8 Rms Current Factor K
t
4.9 The Effect of Frequency on Transformer 
Size 4.10 Flux Density Swing 5b 4.11 The Impact of Agency Specifications
on Transformer Size 4.12 Calculation of Primary Turns 4.13 Calculating 
Secondary Turns 4.14 Half Turns 4.15 Wire Sizes 4.16 Skin Effects and 
Optimum Wire Thickness 4.17 Winding Topology 4.18 Temperature Rise
4.19 Efficiency 4.20 Higher Temperature Rise Designs 4.21 Eliminating
Breakdown Stress in Bifilar Windings 4.22 RFI Screens and Safety Screens
4.23 Transformer Half-Turn Techniques 4.24 Transformer Finishing and Vacuum 
Impregnation 4.25 Problems
Appendix 4.A, Derivation of Area Product Equations for Transformer Design
Appendix 4.B, Skin and Proximity Effects in High-Frequency Transformer Windings
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
Copy, paste and cut PDF image while preview without adobe reader component installed. Image resize function allows VB.NET users to zoom and crop image.
cut pages from pdf reader; delete page in pdf document
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview component enables compressing and
delete pages from pdf in preview; delete a page from a pdf reader
xii
CONTENTS
5. OPTIMUM 150-WTRANSFORMER DESIGN EXAMPLE
USING NOMOGRAMS
3.105
5.1 Introduction 5.2 Core Size and Optimum Flux Density Swing 5.3 Core
and Bobbin Parameters 5.4 Calculate Primary Turns 5.5 Calculate Primary 
Wire Size 5.6 Primary Skin Effects 5.7 Secondary Turns 5.8 Secondary
Wire Size 5.9 Secondary Skin Effects 5.10 Design Notes 5.11 Design
Confirmation 5.12 Primary Copper Loss 5.13 Secondary Copper 
Loss 5.14 Core Loss 5.15 Temperature Rise 5.16 Efficiency
6. TRANSFORMER STAIRCASE SATURATION 
3.111
6.1 Introduction 6.2 Methods of Reducing Staircase Saturation Effects
6.3 Forced Flux Balancing in Duty-Ratio-Controlled Push-Pull Converters
6.4 Staircase Saturation Problems in Current-Mode Control Systems
6.5 Problems
7. FLUX DOUBLING
3.117
8. STABILITYAND CONTROL-LOOP COMPENSATION IN SMPS
3.119
8.1 Introduction 8.2 Some Causes of Instability in Switchmode Supplies
8.3 Methods of Stabilizing the Loop 8.4 Stability Testing Methods
8.5 Test Procedure 8.6 Transient Testing Analysis 8.7 Bode Plots
8.8 Measurement Procedures for Bode Plots of Closed-Loop Power Supply Systems
8.9 Test Equipment for Bode Plot Measurement 8.10 Test Techniques
8.11 Measurement Procedures for Bode Plots of Open-Loop Power Supply 
Systems 8.12 Establishing Optimum Compensation Characteristic by the 
“Difference Method” 8.13 Some Causes of Stubborn Instability 8.14 Problems
9. THE RIGHT-HALF-PLANE ZERO
3.133
9.1 Introduction 9.2 Explanation of the Dynamics of the Right-Half-Plane Zero
9.3 The Right-Half-Plane Zero—A Simplified Explanation 9.4 Problems
10. CURRENT-MODE CONTROL
3.139
10.1 Introduction 10.2 The Principles of Current-Mode Control
10.3 Converting Current-Mode Control to Voltage Control 10.4 Performance
ofthe Complete Energy Transfer Current-Modecontrolled Flyback Converter
10.5 The Advantages of Current-Mode Control in Continuous-Inductor-
Current Converter Topologies 10.6 Slope Compensation 10.7 Advantages
ofCurrent-Mode Control in Continuous-Inductor-Current-Mode Buck 
Regulators 10.8 Disadvantages Intrinsic to Current-Mode Control 10.9 Flux
Balancing in Push-Pull Topologies When Using Current-Mode Control
10.10 Asymmetry Caused by Charge Imbalance in Current-Mode-
Controlled Half-Bridge Converters and Other Topologies Using DC Blocking 
Capacitors 10.11 Summary 10.12 Problems
11. OPTOCOUPLERS
3.157
11.1 Introduction 11.2 Optocoupler Interface Circuit 11.3 Stability and Noise
Sensitivity 11.4 Problems
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
applications. Support adding and inserting one or multiple pages to existing PDF document. Forms. Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer
delete pdf pages in preview; delete pages pdf file
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET Able to cut and paste image into another PDF Remove PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; cut pages from pdf
CONTENTS
xiii
12. RIPPLE CURRENT RATINGS FOR ELECTROLYTIC CAPACITORS
IN SWITCHMODE POWER SUPPLIES
3.163
12.1 Introduction 12.2 Establishing Capacitor RMS Ripple Current Ratings 
From Published Data 12.3 Establishing the Effective RMS Ripple Current in 
Switchmode Output-Filter Capacitor Applications 12.4 Recommended Test
Procedures 12.5 Problems
13. NONINDUCTIVE CURRENT SHUNTS
3.169
13.1 Introduction 13.2 Current Shunts 13.3 Resistance/Inductance Ratio of a
Simple Shunt 13.4 Measurement Error 13.5 Construction of Low-Inductance
Current Shunts 13.6 Problems
14. CURRENTTRANSFORMERS
3.173
14.1 Introduction 14.2 Types of Current Transformers 14.3 Core Size
and Magnetizing Current (All Types) 14.4 Current Transformer Design
Procedure 14.5 Unidirectional Current Transformer Design Example
14.6 Type 2, CurrentTransformers (for Alternating Current) Push-Pull
Applications) 14.7 Type 3, Flyback-Type Current Transformers 14.8 Type 4, 
DC Current Transformers (Dcct) 14.9 Using Current Transformers in Flyback 
Converters
15. CURRENT PROBES FOR MEASUREMENT PURPOSES
3.189
15.1 Introduction 15.2 Special-Purpose Current Probes 15.3 The
Design of Current Probes for Unidirectional (Discontinuous) Current Pulse 
Measurements 15.4 Select Core Size 15.5 Calculate Required Core 
Area 15.6 Check Magnetization Current Error 15.7 Current Probes in 
Applications with DC and AC Currents 15.8 High-Frequency AC Current 
Probes 15.9 Low-Frequency AC Current Probes 15.10 Problems
16. THERMAL MANAGEMENT
(IN SWITCHMODE POWER SUPPLIES)
3.197
16.1 Introduction 16.2 The Effect of High Temperatures on Semiconductor Life
and Power Supply Failure Rates 16.3 The Infinite Heat Sink, Heat Exchangers, 
Thermal Shunts, and Their Electrical Analogues 16.4 The Thermal Circuit
and Equivalent Electrical Analogue 16.5 Heat Capacity C
h
(Analogous to 
Capacitance C) 16.6 Calculating Junction Temperature 16.7 Calculating
the Heat Sink Size 16.8 Methods of Optimizing Thermal Conductivity Paths,
and Where to Use “Thermal Conductive Joint Compound” 16.9 Convection, 
Radiation, or Conduction? 16.10 Heat Exchanger Efficiency 16.11 The Effect
of Input Power on Thermal Resistance 16.12 Thermal Resistance and Heat
Exchanger Area 16.13 Forced-Air Cooling 16.14 Problems
PART 4 SUPPLEMENTARY
1. ACTIVE POWER FACTOR CORRECTION
4.3
1.1 Introduction 1.2 Power Factor Correction Basics, Myths, and Facts
1.3 Passive Power Factor Correction 1.4 Active Power Factor Correction
1.5 More Regulator Topologies 1.6 Buck Regulators 1.7 Combinations of 
VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net
Able to embed link to specific PDF pages in VB.NET Copy, cut and paste PDF link to another PDF file in Edit PDF url in preview without adobe PDF reader control.
delete pages in pdf online; delete blank pages in pdf online
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Separate PDF file into single ones with defined pages. Advanced component for splitting PDF document in preview without any third-party plug-ins
delete pages from pdf acrobat; cut pages from pdf preview
xiv
CONTENTS
Converters 1.8 Integrated Circuits for Power Factor Control 1.9 Typical IC 
Control System 1.10 Applied Design 1.11 Choice of Control IC 1.12 Power 
Factor Control Section 1.13 Buck Section Drive Stage 1.14 Power Components
Appendix 1.A, Boost Choke for Power Factor Correction: Design Example
2. THE MERITS AND LIMITATIONS OF HARD SWITCHING
AND FULLY RESONANT SWITCHMODE POWER SUPPLIES
4.69
2.1 Introduction 2.2 Advantages and Limitations of Hard Switching 
Methods 2.3 Fully Resonant Switching Systems 2.4 Current Fed Parallel 
Resonant Ballast 2.5 Wound Component Design 2.6 Conclusions
3. QUASI-RESONANT SWITCHING CONVERTERS
4.87
3.1 Introduction 3.2 Hard Switching Methods 3.3 Fully Resonant Methods
3.4 Quasi-ResonantSystems 3.5 The Power Section of a Full-Bridge, Quasi-
Resonant, Zero-Voltage Transition, Phase-Shift Modulated, 10-kW Converter
3.6 Q1-Q4 Bridge FET Drive Timing 3.7 Power Switching Sequence
3.8 Optimum Conditions for Zero Voltage Switching 3.9 Establishing
the Optimum Resonant Inductance (L
1e
) 3.10 Transformer Leakage 
Inductance 3.11 Output Rectifier Snubbing 3.12 Switching Speed and 
Transition Periods 3.13 Primary and Secondary Power Circuits 3.14 Power 
Waveforms and Power Transfer Conditions 3.15 Basic FET Drive Principles
3.16 Modulation and Control Circuits 3.17 Switching Asymmetry in the Power 
Stage FETs 3.18 Control ICs
4. A FULLY RESONANT SELF-OSCILLATING CURRENT FED FET TYPE
SINEWAVE INVERTER 
4.123
4.1 Introduction 4.2 Basic FET Resonant Inverter 4.3 Starting the FET Inverter
4.4 Improved Gate Drive 4.5 Other Methods of Starting 4.6 Auxiliary Supply
4.7 Summary
5. A SINGLE CONTROLWIDE RANGE SINEWAVE OSCILLATOR 
4.133
5.1 Introduction 5.2 Frequency and Amplitude Control Theory 5.3 Operating 
Theory for the Wide Range Sine Wave VCO 5.4 Circuit Performance
Glossary    G.1
References    R.1
Index    I.1
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Independent component for splitting PDF document in preview without using separate source PDF file to smaller PDF documents by every given number of pages.
delete pages pdf online; delete page from pdf acrobat
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
An independent .NET framework viewer component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. Able
delete page pdf file reader; cut pages out of pdf online
xv
PREFACE
When Keith Billings wrote the first edition of Switchmode Power Supply Handbook
over twenty years ago, he was aware that many engineers had expressed the desire for a 
general handbook on the subject. He responded to this need with a practical, easy-to-read 
explanation of many of the techniques in common use, together with some of the latest 
developments. The author has drawn upon his own experience of the questions most often 
asked by students and junior engineers to address the subject in the most straightforward 
way, giving explicit design examples which do not assume any previous knowledge of 
the subject. In particular, the design of the wound components is covered very fully, since 
these are critical to the final performance but tend to be rather poorly understood.
In the third edition Keith continues the easily assimilated, nonacademic treatment, using 
the simplified theory and mathematical analysis that was so well received in the previous 
editions, waiving the fully rigorous approach in the interests of simplicity. As a result, this 
latest edition should once again appeal to students, junior engineers, and interested non-
specialist users, as well as practicing professional power supply engineers. 
The new edition covers the subject from simple system explanations (with typical spec-
ifications and performance parameters) to the final component, thermal, and circuit design 
and evaluation, and now includes new material related to resonant and quasi-resonant 
systems and highly efficient, high power, phase shift-modulated switching converters.
As before, to simplify the design approach, considerable use has been made of nomo-
grams, many of which have been developed by the author, originally for his own use. Some 
of the more academic supporting theory is covered in the chapter appendixes, and those 
who wish to go further should read these and the many excellent specialized books and 
papers mentioned in the references.
Since the seventies, switchmode power supply design has developed from a somewhat 
neglected “black art” to a precise engineering science. The rapid advances in electronic 
component miniaturization and space exploration have led to an ever-increasing need for 
small, efficient, power processing equipment. In recent years this need has caught and 
focused the attention of some of the world’s most competent electronic engineers. As a 
result of intensive research and development, there have been many new innovations with 
a bewildering array of topologies.
As yet, there is no single “ideal” system that meets all needs. Each topology lays claim 
to various advantages and limitations, and the power supply designer’s skill and experi-
ence is still needed to match the specification requirements to the most suitable topology 
to define the preferred technique for a particular application.
The modern switchmode power supply will often be a small part of a more complex 
processing system. Hence, as well as supplying the necessary voltages and currents for the 
user’s equipment, it will often provide many other ancillary functions—for example, power 
good signals (showing when all outputs are within their specified limits), power failure 
warning signals (giving advanced warning of line failure), and overtemperature protection, 
which will shut the system down before damage can occur. Further, it may respond to an 
external signal demand for power on or power off. Power limit and current limit circuitry 
will protect the supply and load from fault conditions. Overvoltage protection is often 
provided to protect sensitive loads from overvoltage conditions, and in some special appli-
cations, synchronization of the switching frequency to an external clock will be provided. 
Hence, the power supply designer must understand and meet many needs.
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
NET. An independent .NET framework component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF control installed. Access
reader extract pages from pdf; delete page in pdf reader
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Preview PDF documents without other plug-ins. The following example will tell you how to create a PDF document with 2 empty pages.
copy pages from pdf to word; delete page on pdf document
xvi
PREFACE 
To utilize or specify a modern power processing system more effectively, the user 
should be familiar with the advantages and limitations of the many techniques available. 
With this information, the system engineer can specify the power supply requirements so 
that the most cost-effective and reliable system may be designed to meet these needs. Very 
often a small change in specification or rearrangement of the power distribution system 
will allow the power supply designer to produce a much more reliable and cost-effective 
solution to the user’s needs. Hence, to produce the most reliable and cost-effective design, 
the development of the specification should be an interactive exercise between the power 
supply designer and the user.
Very often, power supply specifications have inflexible and often artificial bound-
aries and limitations. These unrealistic specifications usually result in overspecified 
requirements and hence an overdesigned supply. This in turn can entail high cost, 
high complexity, and lower reliability. The power supply user who takes the trouble 
to understand the limitations and advantages of modern switchmode techniques will 
be in a far better position to specify and obtain reliable and cost-effective solutions 
to power supply requirements.
The book is presented in four parts:
Part 1, “Functional  Requirements  Common to Most Direct-Off-Line Switchmode 
Power Supplies,” covers, in simple terms, the requirements which tend to be common to 
any supply intended for operation direct from the ac line supply. It gives details of the 
various techniques in common use, highlighting their major advantages and limitations, 
together with typical applications. In this new edition, Chapter 23 has been expanded 
to include a current-fed, self-oscillating, resonant sine wave inverter adapted to provid-
ing multiple distributed independently isolated auxiliary supplies for a large system. 
The need for semi-stabilized outputs with very low noise are addressed by a linear pre-
regulator that also affords current limiting and the use of sine wave power distribution 
for low system noise.
Part 2, “Design, Theory and Practice,” considers the selection of power components 
and transformer designs for many well-known converter circuits. It is primarily intended 
to assist practicing power supply engineers in developing conservatively rated prototypes 
with more speed  and minimum effort. It provides examples, information, and design 
theory sufficient for a general understanding and the initial design of the more practical 
switchmode power supplies. However, to produce fully optimized designs, the reader will 
need to become conversant with the more specialized information presented in Part 3 and 
the many references.
Part 3, “Applied Design,” deals with many of the more general engineering require-
ments of switchmode systems, such as transformer design, choke design, input filters, RFI 
control, snubber circuits, thermal design, and much more. 
Part 4, “Supplementary,” looks at a number of selected topics that may be of more inter-
est to power supply professionals.
The first topic covers the design of an active power factor correction system. The 
power distribution industry is becoming more concerned with the increasing level of 
harmonic content caused by non-corrected electronic equipment and in particular elec-
tronic ballasts for fluorescent lighting. Active power factor correction is still a relatively 
new addition to the power supply designer’s tasks. It is difficult to display waveforms 
and design power inductors, due to the dynamic behavior of the boost topology, with its 
low- and high-frequency requirements. This part should help remove some of the mystery 
regarding this subject.
In most switchmode power supplies, it is the wound components that mainly control 
the efficiency and performance. Switching devices will work efficiently only if leakage 
inductances are small and good coupling is provided between input and output windings. 
The designer has considerable control over the wound components, but it requires considerable 
PREFACE
xvii
knowledge and skill to overcome the many practical and engineering problems encoun-
tered in their design. The author has therefore concentrated on the wound components, 
and provided many worked examples. To develop a full working knowledge of this critical 
area, the reader should refer to the more rigorous transformer design information given in 
Part 3, and the many references.
The advances in resonant and semi-resonant converters have focused much attention 
on these promising techniques. An examination of the pros and cons of a fully resonant 
technique is demonstrated by the design of a resonant fluorescent ballast. The principles 
demonstrated are applicable to many other fully resonant systems.
A quasi-resonant system is demonstrated by the design of a high-power, full bridge 
converter that uses both semi-resonant techniques and phase shift modulation to achieve 
very high efficiency and low noise. This section includes a step-by-step analysis of each 
stage of operation of the circuit during the progress of the switching cycle.
In Part 4 Chapters 4 and 5, co-author Taylor Morey shows a current fed, self-oscillating, 
fully resonant inverter using power MOSFETs. This version has the advantage of near 
ideal zero voltage switching transitions that result in harmonic free waveforms of high 
purity. He also shows a variable frequency sine wave oscillator, implemented with opera-
tional transconductance amplifiers. In this design the frequency can be adjusted with a 
single manual control, or electronically swept over a wide range from milliHertz to hun-
dreds of kiloHertz.
No single work can do full justice to this vast and rapidly developing subject. The 
reader’s attention is directed to the Reference section where many related books and 
papers will be found that extend the range of knowledge well beyond the scope of this 
book. It is hoped that this new edition will at least partly fill the need for a more general 
handbook on the subject. 
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
No man is an island. We progress not only by our own efforts, but also by utilizing the 
work of those around us and by building on the foundations of those who went before. The 
reference section is an attempt to acknowledge this. I have no doubt that many more works 
should have been mentioned. I sincerely apologize for any omissions; it is often difficult 
to remember the original source.
I am grateful to the many who have contributed to the third edition, but worthy of 
special mention is my engineering colleague and co-author Taylor Morey, who spent 
hundreds of hours carefully checking the new manuscript and calculations and also 
contributed to this edition with Part 4, Chapters 4 and 5. I also thank Unitrode and 
Lloyd H. Dixon, Jr., for permission to reproduce his work on “The Right-Half-Plane 
Zero” and Texas Instruments for permission to reproduce application information. We 
also recognize the editors and staff of McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, who added 
much to this work.
—Keith Billings
xviii
UNITS, SYMBOLS, 
DIMENSIONS, 
AND ABBREVIATIONS
USED IN THIS BOOK
Units, Symbols, and Dimensions
In general, the units and symbols used in this book conform to the International Standard 
(SI) System. However, to yield convenient solutions, the equations are often dimensionally 
modified to convenient multiples or submultiples. (The preferred dimensions are shown 
following each equation.)
The imperial system is used for thermal calculations, because most thermal information 
is still presented in this form. Dimensions are in inches (1 in  25.4 mm) and temperatures 
are in degrees Celsius, except for radiant heat calculations, which use the absolute Kelvin 
temperature scale.
Some graphs and equations in the magnetics sections use CGS units where this is 
common practice. Many manufacturers still provide magnetic information in CGS units; 
for example, magnetic field strength is shown in oersted(s) rather than At/m. (1 At/m 
12.57 r 10 3 Oe.)
It is industry standard practice to show core loss in terms of milliwatts per gram, with 
“peak flux density 
ˆ
B” as a parameter. (Because these graphs were developed for conven-
tional push-pull transformer applications, symmetrical flux density swing about zero is 
assumed.) Hence, loss graphs assume a peak-to-peak swing of 
2
ˆ
B.
To prevent confusion, 
when nonsymmetrical flux excursions are considered in this book, the term “peak flux 
density
ˆ
B” is used only to indicate peak values. The term “flux density swing $B” is used 
to indicate total peak-to-peak excursion. 
Fundamental SI Quantities
Quantity name
Quantity symbol
Unit name
Unit symbol
Mass
m
Kilogram
kg
Length
l
Meter
m
Time
t
Second
s
Electric current
I
Ampere
A
Temperature
T
Kelvin
K
SYMBOLS
xix
Multiples and Submultiples of Units Are Limited to the Following Range
Symbol prefix
Prefix name
Power multiple
M
mega-
106
k
kilo-
103
m
milli-
10–3
M
micro-
10–6
n
nano-
10–9
p
pico-
10–12
Symbols for Physical Quantities
Quantity
Quantity
symbol
Unit name
Unit
symbol
Formula
Electric
Capacitance
C
farads
F
Ss
Charge
Q
coulombs
C
As
Current
I
amperes
A
V/7
Energy
U
joules
J
Ws
Impedance
Z
ohms
7
Inductance, self-
L
henries
H
Wb/A
Potential difference
V
volts
V
Wb/s
Power, real (active)
P
watts
W
VI cos Q
Power, apparent
S
volt amperes
VA
VA
Reactance
X
ohms
7
Resistance
R
ohms
7
V/A
Resistivity, volume
T
ohm-centimeters
7-cm
R A
I
ʉ
Magnetic
Field strength
H
amperes per meter
A/m
Field strength (CGS)
H
oersteds
Oe
4P(10–3)A/m
Flux
&
webers
Wb
Vs
Flux density
B
teslas
T
Wb/s
Permeability
O
henries per meter
H/m
Vs/Am
Other
Angular velocity
Y
radians per second
rad/s
2P f
Area
A
centimeters squared 
cm2
Frequency
f
hertz
Hz
s 1
Length
l
centimeters
cm
Skin thickness
$
millimeters
mm
Temperature
T
degrees Celsius
°C
Temperature, absolute
T
kelvins
K
Time
t
seconds
s
Winding height
L
millimeters
mm
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested