c# pdf reader itextsharp : Delete pdf pages in reader Library SDK component asp.net wpf winforms mvc Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi10-part476

1.68
PART 1
Therefore
C
e

r r

064 6 10
22 4
171
3
.
.
μF
Since two capacitors are to be used in series, each capacitor will be 342 μF minimum. 
In this example, the capacitors’ values exceed the minimum 3 μF/W criterion but are not 
clearly oversize. Hence, the ripple voltage needs may not be the dominant factor, and the 
ripple current rating and holdup time should also be checked.
Voltage Rating
This is perhaps an obvious parameter, but remember to consider maximum input voltages 
and minimum loads. Also, the voltage margin should include an allowance for temperature 
derating and required MTBF derating needs. 
Size and Cost 
High-voltage high-capacity electrolytic capacitors are expensive and large. It is not cost-
effective to use oversize components. 
Holdup Time 
Holdup time is the minimum time period for which the supply will maintain the output 
voltages within their output regulation limits when the input supply is removed or falls 
below the input regulation limits. Although “holdup time” has been considered last, it is 
often the dominant factor and may even be the main reason that a switchmode supply was 
chosen. 
In spite of its obvious importance, holdup time is often poorly specified. This parameter 
is a function of the size of the storage capacitor C
e
, the applied load, the voltage on the 
capacitor at the time of line failure, and the design of the supply (dropout voltage). Note: It 
is difficult, inefficient, and expensive to design for a very low dropout voltage. 
It is clearly very important to define the loading conditions, output voltage, and supply 
voltage immediately prior to failure when specifying holdup time. 
It has become the industry standard to assume nominal input voltage and full-load oper-
ation unless otherwise stated in the specifications. In critical computer and control applica-
tions, it may be essential to provide a specified minimum holdup time from full-load and 
minimum input voltage conditions. If this is the real requirement, then it must be specified, 
as it has a major impact on the size and cost of the reservoir capacitors and will become the 
dominant selection factor. (Because of the higher cost, very few “standard off-the-shelf”
supplies meet this second condition.) 
In either case, if the holdup time exceeds 20 ms, it will probably be the dominant capaci-
tor sizing factor, and C
e
will be evaluated to meet this need. In this case, the minimum 
reservoir capacitor size C
e(min)
is calculated on the basis of energy storage requirements as 
follows: Let 
C  minimum effective reservoir capacitor size, MF
E
o
 output energy used during holdup time (output power × holdup time)
Delete pdf pages in reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete a page from a pdf online; add and delete pages from pdf
Delete pdf pages in reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
copy pages from pdf into new pdf; delete a page from a pdf in preview
6. LINE RECTIFICATION AND CAPACITOR INPUT FILTERS
1.69
E
i
 input energy used during holdup time (E
o
/efficiency)
V
s
 DC voltage on reservoir capacitor (at start of line failure)
E
cs
 energy stored in reservoir capacitor (at start of line failure)
V
f
 voltage on reservoir capacitor (at power supply drop-out)
E
ef
 energy remaining in reservoir capacitor (at power supply dropout)
Now:
E
CV
E
CV
cs
s
ef
f


1
2
1
2
2
2
( )
( )
Then:
Energy used E
i
 energy removed from capacitor
E
CV
CV
CV
V
i
s
f
s
f


1
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
( )
( )
(
)
Thus:
C
E
V
V
e
i
s
f
(min)

2
2
2
Example 
Calculate the minimum reservoir capacitor value C
e
to provide 42 ms of holdup time at an 
output power of 90 W. The minimum input voltage prior to failure is to be 190 V. 
The supply is designed for 230-V rms nominal input, with the link position selected for 
bridge operation. The efficiency is 70%, and the power supply drop-out input voltage is 
152 V rms. The effective series resistance in the input filter (R
s
) is 1 7.
Since the failure may occur at the end of a normal half cycle quiescent period, the 
capacitor may have already been discharging for 8 ms, so the worst-case discharge period 
can be (42   8)  50 ms. This period must be used in the calculation. 
From Fig. 1.6.7, the DC voltage across the two series storage capacitors C5 and C6 prior 
to line failure and at drop-out will be 
V
V
s
f

r


r

135 190 256
135 152 205
.
.
VDC
V
During this period the energy used by the supply E
i
Output power time
Efficiency %
r
r

r
r
100 90 50 10
33
100
70
643
r

%
. J
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete a page from a pdf; delete pages from pdf file online
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
delete pages out of a pdf; delete blank page in pdf online
1.70
PART 1
Therefore
C
e(min)
.

r

2 6 43
256
205
547
2
2
μF
Since two capacitors in series are to be used for C
e
, the value must be doubled, giving two 
capacitors of 1094 μF minimum. To allow for tolerance and end-of-life degrading, two 
standard 1500-μF capacitors would probably be used in this example. 
It is clear that this is a very large capacitance for a 90-W power supply and that it is more 
than adequate to meet ripple current and ripple voltage requirements. This capacitor choice 
is clearly dominated by the holdup time needs. 
6.15 SELECTING INPUT FUSE RATINGS 
It has been shown in Fig. 1.6.4 that the rms input current is a function of load, source 
resistance R
s
, and storage capacitor value. It is maximum at low input voltages. It is the 
rms input current that causes fuse element heating and hence defines the fuse’s continuous 
rating. Further, the fuse must withstand the inrush current on initial switch-on at maximum 
input voltage. 
Procedure: Select the input fuse continuous rms current rating as defined by Fig. 1.6.4, 
allowing a 50% margin for aging effects. 
Select the I2t rating to meet the inrush needs as defined in Part 1, Chap. 7.
6.16 POWER FACTOR AND EFFICIENCY 
MEASUREMENTS 
From Fig. 1.6.3, it can be seen that the input voltage is only slightly distorted by the very 
nonlinear load of the capacitor input filter. The sinusoidal input is maintained because the 
line input resistance is very low. The input current, however, is very distorted and discon-
tinuous, but superficially would appear to be a part sine wave in phase with the voltage. 
This leads to a common error: The product V
in(rms)
rI
in(rms)
is assumed to give input power. 
This is not so! This product is the input volt-ampere product; it must be multiplied by the 
power factor (typically 0.6 for a capacitor input filter) to get true power. 
The reason for the low power factor is that the nonsinusoidal current waveform con-
tains a large odd harmonic content, and the phase and amplitude of all harmonics must be 
included in the measurement.
The input power is best measured with a true wattmeter with a bandwidth exceed-
ing 1 kHz. Many moving-coil dynamometer instruments are suitable; however, beware of 
instruments containing iron, as these can give considerable errors at the higher harmonic 
frequencies. Modern digital instruments are usually suitable, provided that the bandwidth 
is large, they have a large crest factor, and true rms sensing is provided. Again beware of 
instruments which are peak or mean sensing, but rms calibrated, as these will read correctly 
only for true sine-wave inputs. (Rectified moving-coil instruments fall into this category.) 
When making efficiency measurements, remember that you are comparing two large 
numbers with only a small difference. It is the difference which defines the power loss 
in the system, and a small error in any reading can give a large error in the apparent loss. 
Figure 1.6.9 shows the possible error range as a function of real efficiency when the input 
and output measurements have a possible error in the range of only 2%.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete page pdf online; add and delete pages in pdf online
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Page: Extract, Copy, Paste PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Copy and Paste PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - PDF File Pages Extraction Guide.
delete a page from a pdf without acrobat; delete pdf pages android
6. LINE RECTIFICATION AND CAPACITOR INPUT FILTERS
1.71
In a multiple-output power supply, many instruments may be used and the potential for 
error is large. When using electrodynamic or dynamometer wattmeters, do not neglect the 
wattmeter burden, which is always present. This error cannot be eliminated by calibration, 
as it depends on the relative ratio of current to voltage, and this changes with each measure-
ment. It also depends on the way the instrument is set up. (In general, the current shunt or 
coil should precede the voltage terminals for high-current, low-voltage measurements, and 
the reverse applies for low-current, high-voltage measurements.) 
6.17 PROBLEMS 
1. Why are capacitive input filters often used for direct-off-line switchmode supplies? 
2. What are the major disadvantages of the capacitive input filter? 
3. What is the typical power factor of a capacitive input filter, and why is it relatively poor?
4. Why must a true wattmeter be used for measuring input power? 
5. Why is line inrush-current limiting required with capacitive input filter circuits? 
6. Why is the input reservoir capacitor ripple current so important in the selection of input 
capacitor types? 
7. What parameters are important in the selection of input rectifiers for capacitive input 
filters? 
8. How can the power factor of a capacitive input filter be improved? 
9. Using the nomograms shown in Fig. 1.6.9, establish the minimum input fuse rat-
ing, reservoir capacitor value, reservoir ripple current, peak current in the rectifier 
FIG. 1.6.9Possible range of error of internal power loss and efficiency calculations 
as a function of real efficiency, with a measurement error of 2%.
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
delete page from pdf file online; delete page pdf
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
delete pages of pdf online; delete pdf pages online
1.72
PART 1
diodes, filter DC output voltage at full load, and voltage regulation at 10% to full load. 
(Assume that the output power is 150 W and the total source resistance including the 
inrush-limiting resistance is 0.75 7, the supply voltage is 100 V rms, the efficiency is 
75%, and a voltage doubler circuit as shown in Fig. 1.6.8 is used.) 
10. Calculate the minumum value of the reservoir capacitor needed to give a holdup time 
of one half cycle at 60 Hz if the SMPS is 70% efficient and the output power is to be 
200 W. (Assume that the supply voltage just before line failure is 90 V rms and the 
dropout voltage is 80 V rms. The supply has a voltage doubler input as shown in 
Fig. 1.6.8, and the source resistance R
sf
is 0.5 7.)
C# Imaging - Scan Barcode Image in C#.NET
RasterEdge Barcode Reader DLL add-in enables developers to add barcode image recognition & barcode types, such as Code 128, EAN-13, QR Code, PDF-417, etc.
add and remove pages from pdf file online; delete pages of pdf preview
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
cut pages out of pdf file; delete blank pages in pdf
1.73
INRUSH CONTROL 
7.1 INTRODUCTION 
In “direct-off-line” switchmode supplies, where minimum size and cost are a major con-
sideration, it is common practice to use direct-off-line semiconductor bridge rectification 
with capacitive input filters to produce the high-voltage DC supply for the converter 
section. 
If the line input is switched directly to this type of rectifier capacitor arrangement, very 
large inrush currents will flow in the supply lines, input components, switches, rectifiers, 
and capacitors. This is not only very stressful on these components, it may also cause inter-
ference with other equipment sharing a common supply line impedance. 
Various methods of “inrush current control” are used to reduce this stress. Normally 
these methods include some form of series limiting resistive device in one or more of the 
supply lines between the input point and the reservoir capacitors. 
These limiting devices usually take one of the following three forms: series resistors, 
thermistor inrush limiting, and active limiting circuits. 
7.2 SERIES RESISTORS 
For low-power applications, simple series resistors may be used, as shown in Fig. 1.7.1. 
However, a compromise must be made, as a high value of resistance, which will give 
a low inrush current, will also  be very dissipative under normal operating conditions. 
Consequently, a compromise selection must be made between acceptable inrush current 
and acceptable operating losses. 
The series resistors must be selected to withstand the initial high voltage and high 
current stress (which occurs when the supply is first switched on). Special high-current 
surge-rated resistors are best suited for this application. Adequately rated wirewound types 
are often used, however. If high humidity is to be expected, the wirewound types should 
be avoided. With such resistors, the transient thermal stress and wire expansion tend to 
degrade the integrity of the protective coating, allowing the ingress of moisture and lead-
ing to early failure. 
Figure 1.7.1 shows the normal positions for the limiting resistors. Where dual input 
voltage operation is required, two resistors should be used in positions R1 and R2. This 
has the advantage of effective parallel operation for low-voltage link positions and series 
operation for high-voltage link positions. This limits the inrush current at similar values for 
the two conditions.
CHAPTER 7 
1.73
1.74
PART 1
Where single-range input voltages are used, then a single inrush-limiting device may be 
fitted at position R3 at the input of the rectifiers.
7.3 THERMISTOR INRUSH LIMITING 
Negative temperature coefficient thermistors (NTC) are often used in the position of R1, 
R2, or R3 in low-power applications. The resistance of the NTCs is high when the supply 
is first switched on, giving them an advantage over normal resistors. They may be selected 
to give a low inrush current on initial switch-on, and yet, since the resistance will fall 
when the thermistor self-heats under normal operating conditions, excessive dissipation 
is avoided. 
However, a disadvantage also exists with thermistor limiting. When first switched 
on, the thermistor resistance takes some time to fall to its working value. If the line input 
is near its minimum at this time, full regulation may not be established for the warmup 
period. Further, when the supply is switched off, then rapidly turned back on again, the 
thermistor will not have cooled completely and some proportion of the inrush protection 
will be lost. 
Nevertheless, this type of inrush limiting is often used for small units, and this is why 
it is bad practice to switch SMPSs off and back on rapidly unless the supply has been 
designed for this mode of operation. 
7.4 ACTIVE LIMITING CIRCUITS 
(TRIAC START CIRCUIT) 
For high-power converters, the limiting device is better shorted out to reduce losses when 
the unit is fully operating.
Position R1 will normally be selected for the start resistor so that a single triac or relay 
may be used. R1 can be shunted by a triac or relay after start-up, as shown in Fig. 1.7.2. 
FIG. 1.7.1 Resistive inrush limiting circuit. (Suitable for bridge and voltage doubler operation, maintaining 
the inrush current at the same value.) 
7. INRUSH CONTROL
1.75
Although Fig. 1.7.2 shows an active limiting arrangement in which a resistor is shunted 
by a triac, other combinations using thyristors or relays are possible. 
On initial switch-on, the inrush current is limited by the resistor. When the input capaci-
tors are fully charged, the active shunt device is operated to short out the resistor, and hence 
the losses under normal running conditions will be low. 
In the case of the triac start circuit, the triac may be conveniently energized by a wind-
ing on the main converter transformer. The normal converter turn-on delay and soft start 
will provide a delay to the turn-on of the triac. This will allow the input capacitors to fully 
charge through the start resistor before converter action starts. This delay is important, 
because if the converter starts before the capacitors are fully charged, the load current will 
prevent full charging of the input capacitors, and when the triac is energized there will be 
a further inrush current. 
For high-power or low-voltage DC-to-DC converter applications (where the power loss 
in the triac is unacceptable), a relay may be used. However, under these conditions, it 
is very important that the input capacitors be fully charged before the relay is operated. 
Consequently, converter action must not commence until after relay contact closure, and 
suitable timing circuits must be used. 
7.5 PROBLEMS 
1. What are three typical methods of inrush control used in switchmode supplies? 
2. Describe the major advantages and limitations of each method.
FIG. 1.7.2 Resistive inrush-limiting circuit with triac bypass for improved efficiency. (Note: Higher inrush 
current for bridge operation.) 
Since the start resistance can have a much higher value in this type of start-up circuit, it is 
not normally necessary to change the start resistor for dual input voltage operation. 
This page intentionally left blank 
1.77
START-UP METHODS 
8.1 INTRODUCTION
In this chapter we consider the auxiliary supplies often required to power the control cir-
cuits in larger power systems. We also consider some common methods used to start such 
systems. If the auxiliary supply is used only to power the power supply converter circuits, 
it will not be required when the converter is off. For this special case, the main converter 
transformer can have extra windings to provide the auxiliary power needs. 
However, for this arrangement, some form of start-up circuit is required. Since this start 
circuit only needs to supply power for a short start-up period, very efficient start systems 
are possible. 
8.2 DISSIPATIVE (PASSIVE) START CIRCUIT 
Figure 1.8.1 shows a typical dissipative start system. The high-voltage DC supply will be 
dropped through series resistors R1 and R2 to charge the auxiliary storage capacitor C3. 
A regulating zener diode ZD1 prevents excessive voltage being developed on C3. The 
charge on C3 provides the initial auxiliary power to the control and drive circuits when 
converter action is first established. This normally occurs after the soft-start procedure is 
completed.
The auxiliary supply is supplemented from a winding on the main transformer T1 when 
the converter is operating, preventing any further discharge of C3 and maintaining the 
auxiliary supply voltage constant. 
A major requirement for this approach is that sufficient start-up delay must be pro-
vided in the main converter to permit C3 to fully charge. Further, C3 must be large 
enough to store sufficient energy to provide all the drive needs for correct start-up of 
the converter. 
In this circuit, R1 and R2 remain in the circuit at all times. To avoid excessive dis-
sipation the resistance must be high, and hence the standby current requirements of the 
drive circuit must be low prior to converter start-up. Since C3 may be quite large, a delay 
of two or three hundred milliseconds can occur before C3 is fully charged. To ensure a 
good switching action for the first cycle of operation, C3 must be fully charged before 
start-up, and this requires a low-voltage inhibit and delay on the start-up control and drive 
circuits. 
To its advantage, the technique is very low cost, and resistors R1 and R2 can perform 
dual duty as the normal safety discharge resistors that are inevitably required across the 
large storage capacitors C1 and C2.
CHAPTER 8 
1.77
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested