c# pdf reader itextsharp : Delete pages from pdf acrobat reader application Library tool html .net azure online Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi12-part478

1.88
PART 1
The output voltage now increases progressively, as shown in Fig. 1.10.4, in response to 
the increasing reference voltage, under the full command of the control amplifier. Since the 
correct bias conditions for C2 and amplifier A1 were established at a much lower voltage, 
there will not be an overshoot when the correct voltage has been established. For optimum 
turn-on characteristic via selection of R1, R4, and C1, the change in the reference and 
hence the output voltage is nearly asymptotic to the required 5-V value. Typical turn-on 
characteristics of this type of circuit are shown in Fig. 1.10.4. Small values of C1 will give 
underdamped and large values of C1 overdamped performance. The same principle can be 
applied to any switchmode or linear control circuit. 
10.4 PROBLEMS 
1. Give a typical cause of “turn-on” output voltage overshoot in switchmode supplies. 
2. Give two methods of reducing “turn-on” output voltage overshoot. 
FIG. 1.10.4 “Turn-on” characteristics of modified circuit, showing underdamped, overdamped, 
and optimum response.
Delete pages from pdf acrobat reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pdf page acrobat; delete pages on pdf online
Delete pages from pdf acrobat reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages on pdf; cut pages out of pdf
1.89
OVERVOLTAGE PROTECTION 
11.1 INTRODUCTION 
During fault conditions, most power supplies have the potential to deliver higher output 
voltages than those normally specified or required. In unprotected equipment, it is possible 
for output voltages to be high enough to cause internal or external equipment damage. To 
protect the equipment under these abnormal conditions, it is common practice to provide 
some means of overvoltage protection within the power supply. 
Because TTL and other logic circuits are very vulnerable to overvoltages, it is industry 
standard practice to provide overvoltage protection on these outputs. Protection for other 
output voltages is usually provided as an optional extra, to be specified if required by the 
systems engineer (user). 
11.2 TYPES OF OVERVOLTAGE PROTECTION 
Overvoltage protection techniques fall broadly into three categories: 
Type 1, simple SCR “crowbar” overvoltage protection
Type 2, overvoltage protection by voltage clamping techniques
Type 3, overvoltage protection by voltage limiting techniques 
The technique chosen will depend on the power supply topology, required performance, 
and cost. 
11.3 TYPE 1, SCR “CROWBAR” OVERVOLTAGE 
PROTECTION 
As the  name  implies,  “crowbar” overvoltage protection short-circuits the  offending 
power supply output in response to an overvoltage condition on that output. The short-
circuiting device, usually an SCR, is activated when the overvoltage stress exceeds a 
preset limit for a defined time period. When the SCR is activated, it short-circuits the 
output of the power supply to the common return line, thus collapsing the output volt-
age. A typical simple SCR “crowbar” overvoltage protection circuit connected to the 
output of a linear regulator is shown in Fig. 1.11.1a. It is important to appreciate that 
under fault conditions, the SCR “crowbar” shunt action does not necessarily provide 
good long-term protection of the load. Either the shunt device  must be sufficiently 
CHAPTER 11 
1.89
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Annotate & Comment. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print.
acrobat extract pages from pdf; delete page on pdf file
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
delete page in pdf preview; delete page in pdf online
1.90
PART 1
powerful to sustain the short-circuit current condition for extended periods, or some 
external current limit, fuse, or circuit breaker must be actuated to remove the stress 
from the SCR.
With linear regulator-type DC power supplies, SCR “crowbar” overvoltage protection 
is the normal protection method, and the simple circuit shown in Fig. 1.11.1a is often used. 
The linear regulator and “crowbar” operate as follows: 
The unregulated DC header voltage V
H
is reduced by a series transistor Q1 to provide 
a lower, regulated output voltage V
out
. Amplifier A1 and resistors R1 and R2 provide the 
regulator voltage control, and transistor Q2 and current limiting resistor R1 provide the 
current limit protection. 
FIG. 1.11.1 (a) SCR “crowbar” overvoltage protection circuit, applied to a simple linear regulator. (b) A 
more precise SCR “crowbar” protection circuit using a voltage comparator IC. (c) A specialized control IC 
driving an SCR “crowbar”.
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
delete pdf pages in reader; delete pages out of a pdf file
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
delete blank pages in pdf files; delete page from pdf
11. OVERVOLTAGE PROTECTION
1.91
FIG. 1.11.1 (d) Typical performance characteristic of a delayed “crowbar” circuit. (e) Typical zener diode 
characteristic.
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
add or remove pages from pdf; add and delete pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat. VB example code to create graphics watermark on multiple PDF pages within the
delete pages from a pdf online; delete pages pdf
1.92
PART 1
The most catastrophic failure condition would be a short circuit of the series regulating 
device Q1, so that the higher unregulated header voltage V
H
is now presented to the output 
terminals. Under such fault conditions, both voltage control and current limit actions are 
lost, and the “crowbar” SCR must be activated to short-circuit the output terminals.
In response to an overvoltage fault, the “crowbar” circuit responds as follows: As the 
voltage across the output terminals rises above the “crowbar” actuation voltage, zener 
diode ZD1 conducts driving current via R4 into the SCR gate delay capacitor C1. After a 
short delay period defined by the values of C1, R4 and the applied voltage, C1 will have 
charged to the gate firing voltage (0.6 V), and the SCR will conduct to short-circuit the 
output terminals via the low-value limiting resistor R5. However, a large current now flows 
from the unregulated DC input through the shunt-connected “crowbar” SCR. To prevent 
over-dissipation in the SCR, it is normal, in linear regulators, to fit a fuse FS1 or circuit 
breaker in the unregulated DC supply. If the series regulator device Q1 has failed, the fuse 
or circuit breaker now clears, to disconnect the prime source from the output before the 
“crowbar” SCR is destroyed. 
The design conditions for such a system are well defined. It is simply necessary to select 
an SCR “crowbar” or other shunt device that is guaranteed to survive the fuse or circuit 
breaker’s “let-through” energy. With SCRs and fuses, this “let-through” energy is normally 
defined in terms of the I2t product, where I is the fault current and t the fuse or breaker 
clearance time. (See Part 1, Chap. 5.) 
Crowbar protection is often preferred and hence specified by the systems engineer 
because it is assumed to provide full protection (even for externally caused overvoltage 
conditions). However, full protection may not always be provided, and the systems engi-
neer should be aware of possible anomalous conditions. 
In standard, “off-the-shelf” power supply designs, the crowbar SCR is chosen to protect 
the load from internal power supply faults. In most such cases, the maximum let-through 
energy under fault conditions has been defined by a suitably selected internal fuse. The 
power supply and load are thus 100% protected for internal fault conditions. However, 
in a complete power supply system, there may be external sources of power, which may 
become connected to the terminals of the SCR-protected power supply as a result of some 
system fault. Clearly, the fault current under these conditions can exceed the rating of the 
“crowbar” protection device, and the device may fail (open circuit), allowing the overvolt-
age condition to be presented to the load. 
Such  external  fault loading  conditions  cannot be anticipated by  the power supply 
designer, and it is the responsibility of the systems engineer (user) to specify the worst-case 
fault condition so that suitable “crowbar” protection devices can be provided. 
11.4 “CROWBAR” PERFORMANCE 
More precise “crowbar” protection circuits are shown in Fig. 1.11.1b and c. The type of 
circuit selected depends on the performance required. In the simple “crowbar,” there is 
always a compromise choice to be made between ideal fast protection (with its tendency 
toward nuisance operation) and delayed operation (with its potential for voltage overshoot 
during the delay period). 
For optimum protection, a fast-acting, nondelayed overvoltage “crowbar” is required. 
This should have an actuation voltage level that just exceeds the normal power supply 
output voltage. However, a simple fast-acting “crowbar” of this type will often give many 
“nuisance” operations, since it will respond to the slightest transient on the output lines. For 
example, a sudden reduction in the load on a normal linear regulator will result in some out-
put voltage overshoot. (The magnitude of the overshoot depends on the transient response 
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
delete pages from pdf; delete pages pdf document
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS on slide with no more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe reader.
add remove pages from pdf; delete page in pdf file
11. OVERVOLTAGE PROTECTION
1.93
of the power supply and the size of the transient load.) With a very fast acting “crowbar,” 
this common transient overvoltage condition can result in unnecessary “crowbar” operation 
and shutdown of the power supply. (The current limiting circuit would normally limit the 
fault current in this type of nuisance operation, so it usually would only require a power 
on-off recycling to restore the output.) To minimize such nuisance shutdowns, it is normal 
practice to provide a higher trip voltage and some delay time. Hence, in the simple “crow-
bar” circuit, a compromise choice must be made among operating voltage, delay time, and 
required protection.
Figure 1.11.1d1 shows the response of a typical delayed “crowbar” to an overvoltage 
fault condition in a linear regulator. In this example, the regulator transistor Q1 has failed to 
a short circuit at instant t
1
. In this failure mode, the output voltage is rapidly increasing from 
the normal regulated terminal voltage V
0
toward the unregulated header voltage V
H
at a rate 
defined by the loop inductance, the source resistance, and the size of the output capacitors 
C0. The crowbar has been set to operate at 5.5 V, which occurs at instant t
2
; however, because 
of the crowbar delay (t
2
to t
3
) of 30 μs (typical values), there is a voltage over-shoot. In the 
example shown, the rate of change of voltage on the output terminals is such that the crowbar 
operates before the output voltage has reached 6 V. At this time the output voltage is clamped 
to a low value V
c
during the clearance time of the fuse (t
3
to t
4
), at which time the voltage falls 
to zero. Hence, full protection of an external IC load would be provided. 
In this example the SCR delay time was selected to be compatible with the 20-μs tran-
sient response typical of a linear regulator. Although this delay will prevent nuisance shut-
downs, it is clear that if the maximum output voltage during the delay period is not to 
exceed the load rating (normally 6.25 for 5-V ICs), then the maximum dv/dt (rate of change 
of output voltage under fault conditions) must be specified. The power supply designer 
should examine the failure mode, because with small output capacitors and low fault source 
resistance, the dv/dt requirements may not be satisfied. Fortunately the source resistance 
need is often met by the inevitable resistance of the transformer, rectifier diodes, current 
sense resistors, and series fuse element. 
11.5 LIMITATIONS OF “SIMPLE” CROWBAR 
CIRCUITS 
The well-known simple crowbar circuit shown in Fig. 1.11.1a is popular for many non-
critical applications. Although this circuit has the advantages of low cost and circuit sim-
plicity, it has an ill-defined operating voltage, which can cause large operating spreads. 
It is sensitive to component parameters, such as temperature coefficient and tolerance 
spreads in the zener diode, and variations in the gate-cathode operating voltage of the 
SCR. Furthermore, the delay time provided by C1 is also variable, depending upon the 
overvoltage stress value, the parameters of the series zener diode ZD1, and the SCR gate 
voltage spreads. 
When an overvoltage condition occurs, the zener diode conducts via R4, to charge C1 
toward the SCR gate firing voltage. The time constant of this charge action is a function of 
the slope resistance of ZD1. This is defined by the device parameters and the current flow-
ing in ZD1, which is a function of the applied stress voltage. Hence, the slope resistance of 
ZD1 quite variable, giving large spreads in the operating delay of the SCR. The only sav-
ing grace in this circuit is that the delay time tends to be reduced as the overvoltage stress 
condition increases. Resistor R1 is fitted to ensure that the zener diode will be biased into 
its linear region at voltages below the gate firing voltage to assist in the definition of the 
output actuating voltage. A suitable bias point is shown on the characteristics of the zener 
diode in Fig. 1.11.1e.
1.94
PART 1
A much better arrangement is shown in Fig. 1.11.1b. In this circuit a precision reference 
is developed by integrated circuit reference ZD2 (TL 431 in this example). This, together 
with comparator amplifier IC1 and the voltage divider network R2, R3, defines the oper-
ating voltage for the SCR. In this arrangement, the operating voltage is well defined and 
independent of the SCR gate voltage variations. Also, R4 can have a much larger resistance, 
and the delay (time constant R4, C1) is also well defined. Because the maximum ampli-
fier output voltage increases with applied voltage, the advantage of reduced delay at high 
overvoltage stress conditions is retained. This second technique is therefore recommended 
for more critical applications. 
Several dedicated overvoltage control ICs are also available; a typical example is shown 
in Fig. 1.11.1c. Take care to choose an IC specifically designed for this requirement, as 
some voltage control ICs will not operate correctly during the power-up transient (just 
when they may be most needed). 
11.6 TYPE 2, OVERVOLTAGE CLAMPING 
TECHNIQUES 
In low-power applications, overvoltage protection may be provided by a simple clamp 
action. In many cases a shunt-connected zener diode is sufficient to provide the required 
overvoltage protection. (See Fig. 1.11.2a.) If a higher current capability is required, a 
more powerful transistor shunt regulator may be used. Figure 1.11.2b shows a typical 
circuit. 
FIG. 1.11.2 Shunt regulator-type voltage clamp circuits. 
It should be remembered that when a voltage clamping device is employed, it is 
highly dissipative, and the source resistance must limit the current to acceptable levels. 
Hence, shunt clamping action can be used only where the source resistance (under 
failure conditions) is well defined and large. In many cases shunt protection of this 
type relies on the action of a separate current or power limiting circuit for its protective 
performance.
An advantage of the clamp technique is that there is no delay in the voltage clamp 
action, and the circuit does not require resetting upon removal of the stress condition. Very 
11. OVERVOLTAGE PROTECTION
1.95
often, overvoltage protection by clamp action is better fitted at the load end of the supply 
lines. In this position it becomes part of the load system design. 
11.7 OVERVOLTAGE CLAMPING WITH SCR 
“CROWBAR” BACKUP 
It is possible to combine the advantages of the fast-acting voltage clamp with the more 
powerful SCR crowbar. With this combination, the delay required to prevent spurious 
operation of the SCR will not compromise the protection of the load, as the clamp circuit 
will provide protection during this delay period. 
For lower-power applications, the simple expedient of combining a delayed crowbar as 
shown in Fig. 1.11.1a with a parallel zener clamp diode (Fig. 1.11.2a) will suffice. 
In more critical high-current applications, simple zener clamp techniques would be 
excessively dissipative, but  without  voltage clamping  the  inevitable voltage overshoot 
caused by the delay in the simple crowbar overvoltage protection circuit would be unac-
ceptable. Furthermore, nuisance shutdowns caused by fast-acting crowbars would also be 
undesirable.
For such critical applications, a more complex protection system can be justified. 
The combination of an active voltage clamp circuit and an SCR crowbar circuit with 
self-adjustable delay can provide optimum performance, by eliminating nuisance shut-
downs and preventing voltage overshoot during the SCR delay period. The delay time 
is arranged to reduce when the stress is large to prevent excessive dissipation during the 
clamping period. (Figure 1.11.3a shows a suitable circuit, and Fig. 1.11.3b the operating 
parameters.) 
In the circuit shown in Fig. 1.11.3a, the input voltage is constantly monitored by com-
parator amplifier A1, which compares the internal reference voltage ZD1 with the input 
voltage (V
out
power supply), using the divider chain R1, R2. (Voltage adjustment is pro-
vided by resistor R1.) In the event of an overvoltage stress, A1  increases and the output 
of A1 goes high; current then flows in the network R4, ZD2, Q1 base-emitter, and R6. This 
current turns on the clamp transistor Q1. 
Q1 now acts as a shunt regulator and tries to maintain the terminal voltage at the clamp 
value by shunting away sufficient current to achieve this requirement. During this clamping 
action, zener diode ZD2 is polarized, and point A voltage increases by an amount defined 
by the zener diode voltage, the base-emitter voltage of Q1, and a further voltage defined 
by the clamp current flowing in R6. This total voltage is applied to the SCR via the series 
network R7, C1, R8 such that C1 will be charging toward the gate firing voltage of the 
SCR. If the overvoltage stress condition continues for a sufficient period, C1 will charge 
to 0.6 V, and SCR1 will fire to short-circuit the supply to the common line. (Resistor 
R9 limits the peak current in SCR1.) 
The performance parameters of this circuit are shown in Fig. 1.11.3b. For a limited 
stress condition, trace A will be produced as follows: At time t
1
an overvoltage fault 
condition occurs and the voltage rises to the voltage clamp point V
ovp
. At this point, Q1 
conducts to shunt away sufficient current to maintain the voltage constant at V
ovp
until 
time t
4
. At this instant, SCR1 is fired, to reduce the output voltage to a low value defined 
by the SCR saturation voltage. At time t
5
the external fuse or circuit breaker operates to 
disconnect the supply. It is clear from this diagram that if the clamping action were not 
provided, the voltage could have risen to an unacceptably high value during the delay 
period as a result of the long delay and the rapidly rising edge on the stress voltage 
condition.
1.96
PART 1
If the current flowing in Q1 during a clamping period is large, the voltage across emitter 
resistor R6 will rapidly increase, increasing the voltage at point A. As a result, the delay 
time for SCR1 will be reduced to t
3
, and the shorter delay reduces the stress and overvoltage 
excursion on Q1. This is depicted by trace B in Fig. 1.11.3b.
Finally, for highly stressful conditions where the current during the clamping period 
is very large, the voltage across R6 will be high enough to bring zener diode ZD3 into 
FIG. 1.11.3 (a) OVP combination circuit, showing an active voltage clamp combined with an 
SCR crowbar. (b) Operating characteristics for the OVP combination circuit shown in (a).
11. OVERVOLTAGE PROTECTION
1.97
conduction, bypassing the normal delay network. SCR1 will operate almost immediately 
at t
2
, shutting down the supply. This is shown by trace C in the diagram. 
This circuit provides the ultimate in overvoltage protection, minimizing nuisance shut-
downs by providing maximum delay for small, low-stress overvoltage transient conditions. 
The delay time is progressively reduced as the overvoltage stress becomes larger, and for 
a genuine failure, very little delay and overshoot is allowed. This technique should be 
considered as part of an overall system strategy, and the components selected to satisfy the 
maximum stress conditions. 
11.8 SELECTING FUSES FOR SCR “CROWBAR” 
OVERVOLTAGE PROTECTION CIRCUITS 
In the event of an overvoltage stress condition caused by the failure of the series regulator 
in a linear power supply, the “crowbar” SCR will be required to conduct and clear the stress 
condition by blowing the series protection fuse. Hence, the designer must be confident 
that the fuse will open and clear the faulty circuit before the SCR is destroyed by the fault 
current.
If a large amount of energy is absorbed in the junction of the SCR within a short period, 
the resultant heat cannot be conducted away fast enough. As a result, an excessive tem-
perature rise occurs, and thermal failure soon follows. Hence, the failure mechanism is 
not simply one of total energy but is linked to the time period during which the energy is 
dissipated.
For periods below 10 ms, very little of the energy absorbed at the junction interface 
will be conducted away to the surrounding package or heat sink. Consequently, for a very 
short transient stress, the maximum energy limit depends on the mass of the junction; this 
is nearly constant for a particular device. For SCRs, this energy limit is normally specified 
as a 10-ms I2t rating. For longer-duration lower-stress conditions, some of the heat energy 
will be conducted away from the junction, increasing the I2t rating. 
In the SCR, the energy absorbed in the junction is more correctly (I2R
j
V
d
I)t joules,
where R
j
is the junction slope resistance and V
d
is the diode voltage drop. However, at high 
currents, I2R
j
losses predominate, and since the slope resistance R
j
tends to be a constant 
for a particular device, the failure energy tends to KI2t.
The same general rules as were considered for the SCR failure mechanism apply to 
the fuse clearance mechanism. For very short time periods (less than 10 ms), very little of 
the energy absorbed within the fuse element will be conducted away to the case, the fuse 
clips, or the surrounding medium (air, sand, etc.). Once again, the fusing energy tends to be 
constant for short periods, and this is defined in terms of the 10-ms I2t rating for the fuse. 
For longer-duration lower-stress conditions, some of the heat energy will be conducted 
away, increasing the I2t rating. Figure 1.5.1 shows how the I2t rating of a typical fast fuse 
changes with stress duration.
Modern fuse technology is very sophisticated. The performance of the fuse can be modi-
fied considerably by its design. Fuses with the same long-term fusing current can behave 
entirely differently for short transient conditions. For motor starting and other high-inrush 
loading requirements, “slow-blow” fuses are chosen. These fuses are designed with rela-
tively large thermal mass fuse elements that can absorb considerable energy in the short 
term without fuse rupture. Hence they have very high I2t ratings compared with their lon-
ger-term current ratings. 
At the other end of the scale, fast semiconductor fuses have very low fuse element mass. 
These fuses are often filled with sand or alumina so that the heat generated by normal 
loading currents can be conducted away from the low-mass fuse element, giving higher 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested