c# pdf reader itextsharp : Delete page pdf file reader control software system azure html wpf console Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi15-part481

1.118
PART 1
in regulator transistor dissipation. This increase may not be within the design parameters 
of the power supply. For this reason, one of the more complex current limit circuits may be 
preferred. These change the shape of the limit characteristic during the turn-on phase, then 
revert to the normal reentrant shape.
Other methods of curing lockout include modifying the shape of the nonlinear load line 
of the lamp itself—for example, by introducing a nonlinear resistor in series with the lamp 
circuit. NTCs (negative coefficient resistors) are particularly suitable, as the resistance of 
the load will now be high when the lamp is first switched on, and low in the normal oper-
ating mode. The NTC characteristic is the inverse of the lamp characteristic, so that the 
composite characteristic tends to be linear or even overcompensated, as shown in Fig. 1.14.4. 
However, a slightly higher voltage is now required from the power supply to offset the 
voltage drop across the NTC.
NTCs are the preferred cure, since they not only cure the “lockout” but also prevent the 
large inrush current to the lamp which would normally occur when the lamp is switched 
on. This limiting action can considerably increase the lamp life.
Nonlinear loads come in many forms. In general, any circuit that demands a large inrush 
current when it is first switched on may be subject to lockout when reentrant current protec-
tion is used.
14.5 REENTRANT LOCKOUT WITH 
CROSS-CONNECTED LOADS 
Lockout problems can occur even with linear resistive loads when two or more foldback-
limited power supplies are connected in series. (This series connection is often used to 
provide a positive and negative output voltage with respect to a common line.) In some 
cases series power supplies are used to provide higher output voltages.
Figure 1.14.5a shows a series arrangement of foldback-limited supplies. Here, positive 
and negative 12-V outputs are provided. The normal resistive loads R1 and R2 would not 
present a problem on their own, provided that the current is within the reentrant character-
istic, as shown by load lines R1 and R2 in Fig. 1.14.5b. However, the cross-connected load 
R3 (which is connected across from the positive to the negative output terminals) can cause 
lockout depending on the load current magnitude.
Figure 1.14.5b shows the composite characteristic of the two foldback-protected sup-
plies. The load lines for R1 and R2 start at the origin for each supply and can cross the 
reentrant characteristics at only one point. However, the cross-connected load R3 can be 
assumed to have its origin at V+ or V-. Hence, it can provide a composite loading character-
istic which is inside or outside of the reentrant area, depending on its value. In the example 
shown, although the sum of the loads is within the characteristic at point P1, a possible 
lockout condition occurs at point P2, when the supplies are first switched on. Once again, 
one cure is to increase the short-circuit current for the two power supplies to a point beyond 
the composite load line characteristic.
In Fig. 1.14.5a, shunt-connected clamp diodes D1 and D2 must be fitted to prevent one 
power supply reverse-biasing its complement during the power-up phase. With foldback 
protection, if a reverse voltage bias is applied to the output terminals of the power supply, 
the reentrant characteristic is deepened and the current is even lower. This effect is shown 
in the dashed extension to the reentrant characteristics in Fig. 1.14.5b.
In conclusion, it can be seen that there are many possible problems in the application 
of foldback-limited supplies. Clearly, these problems are best avoided by not using the 
foldback method if it is not essential. 
Delete page pdf file reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pdf pages android; delete pages in pdf
Delete page pdf file reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from pdf in preview; delete pages from a pdf file
14. FOLDBACK (REENTRANT) OUTPUT CURRENT LIMITING
1.119
FIG. 1.14.5 (a) Bipolar  connection with  cross-coupled load. (b) Composite 
characteristic with bipolar load connections.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET File: Merge PDF; VB.NET File: Split PDF; VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for
delete pages pdf file; delete pages of pdf preview
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
your PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page adding a page into PDF document, deleting unnecessary page from PDF file and changing
delete page from pdf document; delete page in pdf online
1.120
PART 1
14.6 FOLDBACK CURRENT LIMITS 
IN SWITCHMODE SUPPLIES 
The previous limitations would also apply to the application of foldback protection in 
switchmode supplies. However, in switchmode units, the dissipation in the control element 
is no longer a function of the output voltage and current, and the need for foldback current 
protection is eliminated.
Consequently, foldback protection should not be specified for switching supplies. It is 
not necessary for protection of the supply and is prone to serious application problems, such 
as “lockout.” For this reason, constant current limits are preferred in switchmode supplies.
Although the nonlinear reentrant characteristic has nothing to recommend it for switch-
mode supplies, it is often specified. It is probable that its introduction and continued use 
stems from the experience with the linear dissipative regulator, where excessive inter-
nal dissipation would occur under short-circuit conditions with a constant current limit. 
However, this dissipative condition does not occur in switchmode supplies, and since a 
reentrant characteristic can cause problems for the user, there would seem to be no reason 
to specify it for switchmode applications. It makes little sense to put extra circuitry into a 
power unit which only degrades its utility. 
14.7 PROBLEMS
1. Explain in simple terms the phenomenon of “lockout” and its cause in foldback current-
limited supplies.
2. How is it possible to ensure that lockout will not occur with a foldback current limited 
power supply?
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C#
best pdf editor delete pages; delete page in pdf document
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Besides, in the process of splitting PDF document, developers can also remove certain PDF page from target PDF file using C#.NET PDF page deletion API.
delete pdf pages in preview; delete pdf pages
1.121
BASE DRIVE REQUIREMENTS 
FOR HIGH-VOLTAGE 
BIPOLAR TRANSISTORS 
15.1 INTRODUCTION 
Where high-voltage bipolar transistors are used in off-line flyback or other converters, 
stress voltages of the order of 800 V may be encountered. High-voltage transistors with 
V
ceo
ratings in the range 400 to 1000 V generally behave somewhat differently from their 
lower-voltage counterparts. This is due to a fundamental difference in the construction of 
high-voltage devices.
To obtain the most efficient, fast, and reliable switching action, it is essential to use 
correctly profiled base drive current waveforms. To explain this, a simplified review of the 
physical behavior of high-voltage bipolar transistors would be useful. (A full examination 
of the physics of high-voltage transistors is beyond the scope of this book, but excellent 
explanations are provided by W. Hetterscheid49 and D. Roark.81)
High-voltage devices generally have a relatively thick region of high-resistivity mate-
rial in the collector region, and low-resistance material in the base-emitter region. As 
a result of this resistance profile, it is possible (with an incorrectly profiled base drive) 
to reverse-bias the base-emitter region during the turn-off edge. This reverse-bias voltage 
effectively cuts off the base-emitter diode, so that transistor action stops. The collector 
current is now diverted into the base connection during the turn-off edge, giving diode-
like turn-off switching action. That is, the collector-base region now behaves in the same 
way as a reversed-biased diode. It displays a slow recovery characteristic and has a large 
recovered charge.
15.2 SECONDARY BREAKDOWN
The slow recovery characteristic described above is particularly troublesome during the 
turn-off edge with inductive collector loads (such as would be presented by the normal 
leakage inductance of a power transformer).
As a result of the current forcing action of the collector inductance, any part of the 
chip that remains conducting during a turn-off edge must continue to carry the previ-
ously established collector current. Hence, the slow blocking action of the reverse-biased 
CHAPTER 15 
1.121
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Delete unimportant contents Embedded page thumbnails.
delete blank page in pdf online; delete pages pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Add and Insert a Page to PDF File Using VB. doc2.Save( outPutFilePath). Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File Using VB.
delete pages on pdf online; delete pages pdf files
1.122
PART 1
diodelike collector-base recovery not only results in slow and dissipative turn-off, but also 
gives rise to “hot spots” on the chip as the current is forced into a progressively small con-
duction area during the turn-off edge.
It is these “hot spots” that overstress the chip and may cause premature failure. The 
effect is often referred to as “reversed-biased secondary breakdown.”80
15.3 INCORRECT TURN-OFF DRIVE 
WAVEFORMS 
Surprisingly, it is the application of energetic and rapid reverse base drive during the turn-
off edge that is the major cause of secondary breakdown failure of high-voltage transistors 
with inductive loads.
Under aggressive negative turn-off drive conditions, carriers are rapidly removed from 
the area immediately adjacent to the base connections, reverse-biasing the base-emitter 
junction in this area. This effectively disconnects the emitter from the remainder of the 
chip. The relatively small high-resistance area in the collector junction will now grow 
relatively slowly (1 or 2 μs), crowding the collector current into an ever-diminishing por-
tion of the chip.
As a result, not only will the turn-off action be relatively slow, but progressively increas-
ing stress is put on the conducting region of the chip. This leads to the formation of hot spots 
and possible device failure, as previously explained. 
15.4 CORRECT TURN-OFF WAVEFORM
If the base current is reduced more slowly during the turn-off edge, the base-emitter diode 
will not be reverse-biased, and transistor action will be maintained throughout turn-off. 
The emitter will continue to conduct, and carriers will continue to be removed from the 
complete surface of the chip. As a result, all parts of the chip discontinue conducting at 
the same instant.
This gives a much faster turn-off collector-current edge, gives lower dissipation, and 
eliminates hot spots. However, the storage time (the delay between the start of base turn-off 
and the collector-current edge) with this type of drive will be longer.
15.5 CORRECT TURN-ON WAVEFORM
During the turn-on edge, the reverse of the above turn-off action occurs. It is neces-
sary to get as much of the high-resistance region of the collector conducting as quickly 
as possible. To achieve this, the base current should be large, with a fast-rising edge; 
thus carriers are injected into the high-resistance region of the collector as quickly as 
possible.
The turn-on current at the beginning of the “on” period should be considerably higher 
than that  necessary to maintain saturation during the majority of the remaining “on” 
period.
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
The VB.NET PDF document splitter control provides VB.NET developers an easy to use solution that they can split target multi-page PDF document file to one-page
delete pages from pdf; delete blank page from pdf
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Delete unimportant contents Embedded page thumbnails.
delete page pdf; delete page in pdf preview
15. BASE DRIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR HIGH-VOLTAGE BIPOLAR TRANSISTORS
1.123
15.6 ANTISATURATION DRIVE TECHNIQUES
To reduce the storage time, it is a good practice to inject only sufficient base current toward 
the end of the “on” period to just ensure that the transistor remains near but not into satu-
ration. Self-limiting antisaturation networks (“Baker clamps”) are recommended for this. 
(See Part 1, Chap. 17.)
With inductive loads, in addition to the base-current shaping, it is usually necessary to 
provide “snubber networks” between collector and emitter. This snubbing also helps to 
prevent secondary breakdown.80, 82 (See Part 1, Chap. 18.)
It should be remembered that low-voltage power transistors will not necessarily dis-
play the same behavior. These transistors often have a much more heavily doped collector 
region, and the resistance is much lower. Applying a rapid reverse-bias voltage to these 
devices during turn-off is unlikely to generate a high-resistance area. Hence, with low-
voltage transistors, fast switching action and short storage times are best achieved by using 
fast reverse-biased base drive during the turn-off edge.
15.7 OPTIMUM DRIVE CIRCUIT FOR 
HIGH-VOLTAGE TRANSISTORS 
A fully profiled base drive circuit is shown in Fig. 1.15.1a, and the associated drive wave-
forms are shown in Fig. 1.15.1b. This drive circuit operates as follows.
When the drive input to point A goes positive, current will initially flow via C1 and D1 
into the base-emitter junction of the switching transistor Q1. The initial current is large, lim-
ited only by the source resistance and input resistance to Q1, and Q1 will turn on rapidly.
As C1 charges, the voltage across R1, R2, C2, and Lb will increase, and current will 
build up in Lb during the remainder of the “on” period.
Note: While current is flowing in Lb, C2 will continue to charge until the voltage across 
it equals the zener voltage (D2). D2 now conducts, and the drive current will be finally 
limited by R1. (R2 has a relatively large resistance, and the current flow in R2 is small.)
When the drive goes low, D1 blocks, and C1 discharges into R2. The forward current 
in Lb decays to zero and then reverses under the forcing action of the reverse voltage at 
point B. (C2 is large and maintains its charge during the “off” period.)
Hence, during the turn-off edge current builds up progressively in the reverse direction 
in the base-emitter of Q1 until the excess carriers are removed and the base-emitter diode 
blocks. At this instant the voltage on Q1 base flies negative under the forcing action of Lb, 
forcing the transistor into reverse base-emitter breakdown. This reverse breakdown of the 
base-emitter diode is a nondamaging action and clamps off the base emitter voltage at the 
breakdown value until the energy in Lb has been dissipated.
The base drive current waveforms are shown in Fig. 1.15.1b.
Although it is not essential to profile the drive current waveform for all types of high-
voltage transistor, most types will respond well to this type of drive. If the selected transis-
tor is not rated for reverse base-emitter breakdown, then the values of Lb and R3 should 
be selected to prevent this action, or clamp zeners should be fitted across the base-emitter 
junctions.
Since switching device secondary breakdown is probably the most common cause 
of failure in switch mode power supplies, the designer is urged to study appropriate 
references.49, 50, 79, 80, 81, 82
1.124
PART 1
FIG. 1.15.1 (a) Base drive current shaping for high-voltage bipolar transis-
tors. (b) Collector voltage, collector current, base drive current, and base 
emitter voltage waveforms.
15. BASE DRIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR HIGH-VOLTAGE BIPOLAR TRANSISTORS
1.125
15.8 PROBLEMS
1. Why do some high-voltage bipolar transistors require specially profiled base drive cur-
rent waveforms? 
2. Explain one cause of secondary breakdown in a high-voltage bipolar transistor. 
3. Draw the typical ideal base drive current waveform for high-voltage bipolar transistors 
with inductive loads. 
This page intentionally left blank 
1.127
PROPORTIONAL 
DRIVE CIRCUITS 
FOR BIPOLAR TRANSISTORS 
16.1 INTRODUCTION 
It has been shown (see Part 1, Chap. 15) that to obtain the most efficient performance from 
bipolar power switching transistors, the base drive current must be correctly profiled to 
suit the characteristics of the transistor and the collector-current loading conditions. If the 
base drive current remains constant, problems can arise in applications where the collector 
current (load) is not constant.
When the drive current has been chosen for optimum performance at full load, if it then 
remains the same for light loading conditions, the excessive drive will give long storage 
times, which can lead to a loss of control in the following way. Under light loading (when 
narrow pulses are most required), the long storage time will give an excessively wide pulse. 
The control circuit now reverts to a “squegging” control mode. (This is the cause of the 
well-known “frying-pan noise,” a nondamaging instability common to many switchmode 
supplies at light loads.)
Hence, to prevent overdrive and squegging when the load (collector current) is variable, 
it is better to make the amplitude of the base drive current proportional to the collector 
current. Many proportional drive circuits have been developed to meet this requirement. 
A typical example follows.
16.2 EXAMPLE OF A PROPORTIONAL 
DRIVE CIRCUIT
Figure 1.16.1 shows a typical proportional drive circuit applied to a single-ended forward 
converter. In this arrangement, a proportion of the collector current is current-transformer-
coupled by T1 into the base-emitter junction of the main switching transistor Q1, provid-
ing positive proportional feedback. The drive ratio I
b
/I
c
is defined by the turns ratio of the 
drive transformer P1/S1 to suit the gain characteristics of the transistor (typically a ratio of 
between 1/10 and 1/5 will be used).
CHAPTER 16 
1.127
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested