c# pdf reader itextsharp : Delete pdf pages android Library control class asp.net azure .net ajax Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi16-part482

1.128
PART 1
Because the drive power during most of the “on” period is provided from the collector 
circuit, by the coupling from P1 to S1, the drive requirements from Q2 and the auxiliary 
drive circuit are quite small.
16.3 TURN-ON ACTION 
During the previous “off” period of Q1, energy has been stored in T1, since Q2, R1, 
and P2 have been conducting during this period. When Q2 turns off, the drive trans-
former T1 provides the initial turn-on of Q1 by transformer flyback action. Once Q1 is 
conducting, regenerative feedforward from P1 provides and maintains the drive to Q1. 
Hence, Q2 is turned off for the conducting (“on”) period of Q1, and on for the “off” 
period of Q1.
16.4 TURN-OFF ACTION 
When Q2 is turned on again, at the end of a conducting period of Q1, the voltage on all 
windings is taken to near zero by the clamping action of Q2 and D1 across the clamp wind-
ing S2. The previous proportional drive current from P1 is now transformed into the loop 
S2, D1, and Q2, together with any reverse recovery current from the base-emitter junction 
of Q1 via S1 (less the current transformed from P2 as a result of conduction in R1). Hence 
the base drive is removed, and Q1 turns off.
As positive feedback from P1 to S1 is provided in this drive circuit, some care must be 
taken to prevent high-frequency parasitic oscillation of Q1 during its intended “off” state. 
This is achieved by making the “off” state of Q1 the low-impedance “on” state of Q2, and 
by making the leakage inductance between S1 and S2 small. Consequently, any tendency 
FIG.  1.16.1  Single-ended  forward  converter  with  single-ended  proportional  base 
drive circuit.
Delete pdf pages android - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page pdf online; delete a page from a pdf
Delete pdf pages android - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pdf pages online; delete pages from a pdf online
16. PROPORTIONAL DRIVE CIRCUITS FOR BIPOLAR TRANSISTORS
1.129
for feedback from P1 to S1 will be clamped by the drive transistor Q2, D1, and S2, which 
will not allow the start of any winding to go positive.
To prevent Q2 from turning off when it should be on during the power-down phase 
(leading to loss of control during input power-down), the auxiliary supply to the drive 
circuit must be maintained during the system power-down phase. (Large capacitors may be 
required on the auxiliary supply lines.)
16.5 DRIVE TRANSFORMER RESTORATION 
For the first part of the “on” period of the driver transistor Q2, D1 and S2 will be con-
ducting. However, when Q1 has turned off and the recovery current in the base-emitter 
junction of Q1 has fallen to zero, S2 and hence D1 will become reversed-biased as a 
result of the voltage applied to winding P2 via R1. The start of all windings will now go 
negative, and current will build up in winding P2, resetting the core back toward nega-
tive saturation.
At saturation, the current in P2 and Q2 is limited only by resistor R1, the voltage on all 
windings is zero, and the circuit has been reset, ready for the next “on” cycle.
The need for minimum leakage inductance between S1 and S2 tends to be incompat-
ible with the need for primary-to-secondary isolation and creepage distance. Hence if T1 
is used to provide such primary-to-secondary circuit isolation in direct-off-line applica-
tions, the transformer may need to be considerably larger than the power needs alone 
would dictate. 
16.6 WIDE-RANGE PROPORTIONAL 
DRIVE CIRCUITS 
Where the range of input voltage and load are very wide, the circuit shown in Fig. 1.16.1 
will have some limitations, as follows.
When the input voltage is low, the duty cycle will be large, and Q1 may be “on” for 
periods considerably exceeding 50% of the total period. Further, if the minimum load is 
small, L1 will be large to maintain continuous conduction in the output filter. Under these 
conditions, the collector current is small, but the “on” period is long.
During the long “on” period, a magnetizing current builds up in the drive transformer 
T1 as a result of the constant base drive voltage V
be
of Q1 that appears across winding 
S1. Since the drive transformer is a current transformer during this period, the magne-
tizing current is subtracted from the output current. Hence, the intended proportional 
drive ratio is not maintained throughout the long “on” period (the drive falls toward the 
end of the period). To minimize this effect, a large inductance is required in the drive 
transformer T1. 
However, at the end of the “on” period, Q2 must reset the drive transformer core dur-
ing the short “off” period that now remains. To allow a quick reset, the volts per turn 
on P2 must be large. This requires either a small number of turns on P2 (with a large 
reset current) or a large auxiliary voltage. In either case, the power loss on R1 will be 
relatively large.
Hence, a compromise must be made in inductance turns and auxiliary voltage that is 
difficult to optimize for wide-range control at high frequencies. This conflict can be solved 
by the circuit shown in Fig. 1.16.2.
DocImage SDK for .NET: Web Document Image Viewer Online Demo
Microsoft PowerPoint: PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document Format; TIFF: Tagged XML Paper Specification. Supported Browers: IE9+; Firefox, Firefox for Android
delete pages from pdf in reader; delete page on pdf file
VB.NET PDF: Create PDF Mobile Viewer in VB.NET Doc Image Program
With this VB.NET PDF Mobile Viewer Control, you are free to read PDF document in Android based mobile devices, which gives you time flexibility of PDF document
delete pages from pdf file online; delete page pdf file reader
1.130
PART 1
In the circuit shown in Fig. 1.16.2, capacitor C1 charges rapidly when Q2 is off via R1
and Q3. Q3 will be turned on hard by the base drive loop P2, D2, R2 (the starts of all wind-
ings being positive when Q2 is “off” and Q1 “on”).
16.7 TURN-OFF ACTION
When Q2 is turned on, the voltage across P2 is reversed, and the transferred current from 
S1 and P1 flows in the low-impedance loop provided by C1, P2, and Q2. The voltage on 
all windings is reversed rapidly, turning off Q1. At the same time, Q3 is turned off, so that 
as the core is reset and C1 discharges, only a small current is taken from the supply via 
R1, which is now much higher resistance than the similar resistor shown in Fig. 1.16.1.
If Q2 is “on” for a long period and C1 is fully discharged, a flywheel action will be 
provided by D1, preventing reversal of voltage on P2 by more than a diode drop. The turns 
ratio is such that Q1 will not be turned on under these conditions. Finally the core will 
return to a reset point defined by the current in R1.
16.8 TURN-ON ACTION 
When Q2 is turned off, the starts of all windings will go positive by flyback action, and Q1 
will be turned on. Regenerative drive from P1 and S1 maintains the drive, holding Q1 and 
Q3 on and rapidly recharging C1. This action is maintained until Q2 is turned on again to 
complete the cycle. The advantage of this arrangement is that the core can be reset rapidly 
by using a high auxiliary supply voltage without excessive dissipation in R1 and Q2.
FIG. 1.16.2 Single-ended forward converter with push-pull proportional base drive circuits.
VB.NET TIFF: Use VB.NET Class to Create TIFF File Mobile Viewer in
You can not only view your TIFF image in Android mobile application, but We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
cut pages out of pdf online; delete page from pdf online
C# PDF: C# Code to Create Mobile PDF Viewer; C#.NET Mobile PDF
Easily utilize C# mobile PDF document viewer on Android, IOS & Windows platforms; Process PDF document pages with mature C# page-manipulating APIs; View
delete pdf pages reader; delete pages from pdf preview
16. PROPORTIONAL DRIVE CIRCUITS FOR BIPOLAR TRANSISTORS
1.131
Hence, in this circuit the conflict between transformer inductance and reset requirements 
is much reduced; however, the inductance will be made only just large enough to limit the 
magnetizing current to acceptable limits. Sufficient drive must be available to ensure correct 
switching action under all conditions. If the magnetizing current component in the drive trans-
former is allowed to exceed the collector current, then positive feedback action will be lost.
16.9 PROPORTIONAL DRIVE WITH 
HIGH-VOLTAGE TRANSISTORS 
If Q1 is a high-voltage transistor, it is probable that some shaping of the base drive current 
will be required for reliable and efficient operation, as shown in Chap. 15 of Part 1.
Figure 1.16.3 shows a suitable modification to the drive circuit in Fig. 1.16.2 for high-
voltage transistors; base drive shaping has been provided by R4, D3, C2, R3, and Lb. 
FIG. 1.16.3 Push-pull-type proportional drive circuit with special drive current shaping for 
high-voltage transistors.
16.10 PROBLEMS
1. What are the major advantages of proportional drive? 
2. Why does the drive transformer in a proportional drive circuit tend to be larger than the 
power requirements alone would indicate? 
3. The maximum duty ratio for a transformer-coupled proportional drive circuit tends to 
be limited to less than 80%. Why is this? 
4. What controls the minimum and maximum inductance of the proportional drive transformer? 
VB.NET TIFF: Examples to Create VB.NET TIFF Document Viewer in .
rotating / watermarking a few TIFF pages, adding TIFF Easily add / insert, delete / remove a single page or & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
delete pages pdf preview; delete pages pdf document
C# PDF: How to Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET with
Support scanned or not PDF, PDF/A in C#.NET web viewing application; Quickly open & load 1000+ PDF document pages in C#.NET Web Viewer;
delete page from pdf reader; add and delete pages in pdf online
This page intentionally left blank 
C# TIFF: C#.NET Mobile TIFF Viewer, TIFF Reader for Mobile
for fast navigation through loading on-demand pages; Strong page Viewer in C#.NET. As creating PDF and Word page can be customized (add or delete) through; <div
delete pages pdf online; delete blank pages in pdf online
VB.NET PDF: Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET for Document
next page of the PDF document; Able to insert, delete or reorder enables you to view, crop, rotate and zoom PDF documents in iOS and Android mobile platforms
acrobat extract pages from pdf; add and remove pages from pdf file online
1.133
ANTISATURATION 
TECHNIQUES 
FOR HIGH-VOLTAGE 
TRANSISTORS 
17.1 INTRODUCTION
In high-voltage bipolar switching transistors, whereas the “fall time” (speed or dv/dt of
the turn-off edge) is mainly determined by the shape of the base drive current turnoff 
characteristic (see Part 1, Chap. 15), the storage time (delay between the application of the 
base turn-off drive and the start of the turn-off edge) is dependent on the minority carrier 
concentration in the base region immediately prior to turn-off action.
The storage time will be minimized by minimizing the minority carrier concentration, 
that is, by ensuring that the base current is only just sufficient to maintain the transistor in 
a quasi-saturated state prior to turn-off.
One method often used to achieve this is the “Baker (diode) clamp.” This circuit has the 
advantage that, because it is an active drive clamp (with negative feedback), it compensates 
for the inevitable variations in gain and saturation voltage of the various devices. Also, it 
responds to changes of parameters within the switching transistor that occur as a result of 
temperature and load variations.
17.2 BAKER CLAMP 
Figure 1.17.1 shows a typical Baker clamp circuit. It operates as follows.
Diodes D1 and D2, in series with the base drive to Q1, provide a voltage drop in addi-
tion to the transistor V
be
, so that the drive voltage at node A will rise to approximately 2 V 
when Q1 is driven on.
As Q1 turns on, the voltage on its collector will fall toward zero. When the voltage 
reaches approximately 1.3 V, diode D3 will conduct and divert drive current away from the 
base and into the collector of Q1. As this clamping action is subject to negative feedback, 
it will self-adjust until the collector voltage is effectively clamped at 1.3 V.
As a result, the transistor is maintained in a quasi-saturated “on” state with just suf-
ficient base drive current to maintain this condition. This quasi-saturated state maintains 
minimum minority carriers in the base region during the “on” period, giving minimum 
CHAPTER 17 
1.133
C# Word: How to Create Word Mobile Viewer in with Imaging SDK
jpeg, png, gif, bmp and tiff); PDF, Microsoft Word Please go to corresponding pages to get more details. Aimed to enable your Android, iOS and Windows mobile
cut pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf without acrobat
VB.NET Word: VB Code to Create Word Mobile Viewer with .NET Doc
Directly convert your Android, iOS or Windows mobile device NET prorgam, please link to see: PDF Document Mobile can be customized (add or delete); Find <div id
delete page pdf file; add and delete pages from pdf
1.134
PART 1
storage time during the turn-off action. During turn-off, D4 provides a path to Q1 base for 
the reverse turn-off current.
The number of series diodes in the base circuit, D1, D2, . . . Dn, will be selected to suit 
the transistor saturation voltage. The clamp voltage must be above the normal saturation 
voltage of the transistor at the working current, to ensure that true transistor action is main-
tained in the quasi-saturated “on” state. 
A disadvantage of the technique is that the collector voltage during the “on” period is 
somewhat larger than it would be for a fully saturated state, which increases the power loss 
in the transistor.
The Baker clamp arrangement combines ideally with the low-loss “Weaving snubber 
diode” shown in Fig. 1.18.3. (See Part 1, Chap. 18.)
17.3 PROBLEMS
1. What would be the main advantage of using an antisaturation drive technique in high-
voltage switching transistor applications? 
2. Describe the action of a typical antisaturation clamp circuit used for bipolar transistors. 
FIG. 1.17.1 “Baker clamp” antisaturation drive clamp circuit.
1.135
SNUBBER NETWORKS 
18.1 INTRODUCTION
Snubber networks (usually dissipative resistor-capacitor diode networks) are often fitted 
across high-voltage switching devices and rectifier diodes to reduce switching stress and 
EMI problems during turn-off or turn-on of a switching device.
When bipolar transistors are used, the snubber circuit is also required to give “load 
line shaping” and ensure that secondary breakdown, reverse bias, and “safe operating 
area” limits are not exceeded. In off-line flyback converters, this is particularly impor-
tant, as the flyback voltage can easily exceed 800 V when 137-V (ac) voltage-doubled 
input rectifier circuits or 250-V (ac) bridge rectifier circuits (dual input voltage circuits) 
are used.
18.2 SNUBBER CIRCUIT (WITH LOAD LINE 
SHAPING)
Figure 1.18.1a shows the primary of a conventional single-ended flyback converter 
circuit P1, driven by Q1, and a leakage inductance energy recovery winding and diode 
P2, D3. Snubber components D1, C1, and R1 are fitted from the collector to the emit-
ter of Q1. Figure  1.18.1b shows the  voltage and current waveforms to be expected 
in this circuit. If load line shaping is required, then the main function of the snubber 
components is to provide an alternative path for the inductively maintained primary 
current IP as Q1 turns off. With these components fitted, it is now possible to turn off 
Q1 without a significant rise in its collector voltage during turn-off. (The actual voltage 
increase on the collector of Q1 during the turn-off edge depends on the magnitude of 
the diverted current Is, the value of the snubber capacitor C1, and the turn-off time t1
to t2 of Q1.) Without these components, the voltage on Q1 would be very large, defined 
by the effective primary leakage inductance and the turn-off di/dt. Because the snubber 
network also reduces the rate of change of collector voltage during turn-off, it reduces 
RFI problems. 
CHAPTER 18 
1.135
1.136
PART 1
FIG. 1.18.1 (a) Conventional dissipative RC snubber circuit 
applied to a flyback. (b) Current and voltage waveforms of 
RC snubber circuit.
18. SNUBBER NETWORKS
1.137
18.3 OPERATING PRINCIPLES
During the turn-off of Q1, under steady-state conditions, the action of the circuit is 
as follows.
As Q1 turns off, starting at t1 (Fig. 1.18.1b), the primary and leakage inductances 
of T1 will maintain a constant current I
P
in the transformer primary winding. This will 
cause the voltage on the collector of Q1 to rise (t1 to t2), and the primary current will 
be partly diverted into D1 and C1 (Is) (C1 being discharged at this time). Hence, as the 
current in Q1 falls, the inductance forces the difference current I
s
to flow via diode D1 
into capacitor C1.
If transistor Q1 turns off very quickly (the most favorable condition), then the rate of 
change of the collector voltage dV
C
/dt will be almost entirely defined by the original col-
lector current I
P
and the value of C1.
Hence
dV
dt
I
C
C
P

1
With Q1 off, the collector voltage will ramp up linearly (constant-current charge) until the 
flyback clamp voltage (2V
DC
) is reached at t3, when D3 will conduct. Shortly after this (the 
delay depends on the primary-to-secondary leakage inductance), the voltage in the output 
secondary winding will have risen to a value equal to that on the output capacitor C2. At
this point, the flyback current will be commutated from the primary to the secondary circuit 
to build up at a rate controlled by the secondary leakage inductance and the external loop 
inductance through D2, C2 (t
3
to t
4
).
In practice Q1 will not turn off immediately; hence, if secondary breakdown is to be 
avoided, the choice of snubber components must be such that the voltage on the collector 
of Q1 does not exceed V
ceo
before the collector current has dropped to zero. 
Figure 1.18.2a and b shows the relatively high edge dissipation and secondary break-
down load line stress when snubber components are not fitted. Figure 1.18.2c and d shows 
the more benign turn-off waveforms obtained from the same circuit when optimum snubber 
values are fitted. 
18.4 ESTABLISHING SNUBBER COMPONENT 
VALUES BY EMPIRICAL METHODS 
Referring again to Fig. 1.18.1a, unless the turn-off time of Q1 is known (for the maximum 
collector current conditions and selected drive circuit configuration), the optimum choice 
for C1 will be an empirical one, based upon actual measurements of collector turn-off volt-
ages, currents, and time. 
The minimum value of C1 should be such as to provide a safe voltage margin between 
the V
ceo
rating of the transistor and the actual measured collector voltage at the instant the 
collector current reaches zero at t
2
.A margin of at least 30% should be provided to allow 
for component variations and temperature effects. 
The design of the drive circuit, collector current loading, and operating temperatures 
have considerable influence on the switching speed of Q1. A very large value of C1 should 
be avoided, since the energy stored in this capacitor at the end of the flyback action must 
be dissipated in R1 during the first part of the next “on” period of Q1.  
The value of R1  is  a  compromise selection. A low resistance results in  high 
currents in Q1 during turn-on. This gives excessive turn-on dissipation. A very high 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested