c# pdf reader itextsharp : Delete pages from pdf acrobat SDK application project winforms windows .net UWP Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi17-part483

1.138
PART 1
FIG. 1.18.2 “Safe operating area” characterisitics, with and without snubber circuits. 
(a) Turn-on and turn-off voltage, current, and dissipation stress without load line shaping. 
(b) Active load line imposed on “reverse base safe operating area” (RBSOA) limits without 
load line shaping. (Note secondary breakdown stress.) (c) Turn-on and turn-off voltage, cur-
rent, and dissipation stress with load line shaping. (d) Load line and (RBSOA) limits with 
load line shaping.
Delete pages from pdf acrobat - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete blank pages in pdf files; acrobat export pages from pdf
Delete pages from pdf acrobat - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from a pdf document; delete a page in a pdf file
18. SNUBBER NETWORKS
1.139
resistance, on the other hand, will not provide sufficient discharge of C1 during a mini-
mum “on” period. 
Careful examination of the voltage and current waveforms on the collector of Q1, under 
dynamic loading conditions, is recommended. These should include initial turn-on at full-
load and maximum input voltage, wide and narrow pulse conditions, and output short 
circuit. The selection of R1 and C1 for this type of snubber network must always be a 
compromise.
18.5 ESTABLISHING SNUBBER COMPONENT 
VALUES BY CALCULATION 
Figure 1.18.1b shows typical turn-off waveforms when the snubber network D1, C1, R1 
shown in Fig. 1.18.1 is fitted. In this example, C1 was chosen such that the voltage on the 
collector V
ce
will be 70% of the V
ceo
rating of Q1 when the collector current has dropped 
to zero at time t
2
.
Assuming that the primary inductance maintains the primary current constant during 
turn-off, and assuming a linear decay of collector current in Q1 from t1 to t2, the snubber 
current Is will increase linearly over the same period, as shown. 
It is assumed that the fall time of the collector current (t
1
to t
2
) is known from the manu-
facturer’s data or is measured under active drive conditions at maximum collector voltage 
and current. 
During the collector-current fall time of Q1 (t
1
to t
2
), the current in C1 (I
s
) will be 
increasing linearly from zero to I
P
. Hence the mean current over this period will be I
P
/2.
Provided that the maximum primary current I
P
and turn-off time t
1
to t
2
are known, the value 
of the optimum snubber capacitor C1 may be calculated as follows: 
dV
dt
I
C
C
P

2 1
(The ½ factor assumes a linear turn-off ramp on the collector current I
C
such that the mean 
current flowing into C1 is ½ the turn-off peak value during the turn-off period, as shown 
in Fig. 1.18.1b.)
Hence, if the collector voltage is to be no more than 70% of V
ceo
when the collector 
current reaches zero at time t
2
, then
C
I t
V
P f
ceo
1
270

( %
)
where I
P
 maximum primary current, A
t
f
 Q1 collector current fall time (t
1
or t
2
), μS 
V
ceo
V
ceo
rating of selected transistor, V
C1  snubber capacitance, μF 
18.6 TURN-OFF DISSIPATION IN TRANSISTOR Q1 
By the same logic as used above (although the waveform is inverted), C1 and transistor Q1 
both see the same mean current and voltage during the turn-off period. Hence, the dissipa-
tion in the transistor during the turn-off period t
1
to t
2
will be the same as the energy stored 
in C1 at the end of the turn-off period (t
2
).
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Annotate & Comment. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print.
delete pdf pages in reader; add and delete pages in pdf
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
delete a page from a pdf file; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
1.140
PART 1
Hence
P
C
V
f
Q
ceo
1
2
1
2
170
(off)

( %
)
where P
Q1(off)
 power dissipated in Q1 during the off period, mW
C1  snubber capacitance, μF
V
ceo
V
ceo
rating of transistor (70% V
ceo
is the chosen maximum voltage at I
C
 0)
f  frequency, kHz 
18.7 SNUBBER RESISTOR VALUES 
The snubber discharge resistor R1 is chosen to discharge the snubber capacitor C1 during 
the minimum selected “on” period. The minimum “on” period is given by the designed 
minimum load at maximum input voltage and operating frequency. 
The CR time constant should be less than 50% of the minimum “on” period to ensure 
that C1 is effectively discharged before the next “off” period. Hence  
R
t
1
1
2
1

on(min)
18.8 DISSIPATION IN SNUBBER RESISTOR 
The energy dissipated in the snubber resistor during each cycle is the same as the energy stored 
in C1 at the end of the turn-off period. However, the voltage across C1 depends on the type of 
converter circuit. With complete energy transfer, the voltage on C1 will equal the supply voltage 
V
cc
, as all flyback voltages will have fallen to zero before the next “on” period. With continuous-
mode operation, the voltage will equal the supply voltage plus the reflected secondary voltage. 
Having established the voltage across C1 immediately before turn-on (V
C
), the dissipa-
tion in R1 (P
R1
) may be calculated as follows:
P
C V f
R
C
1
2
1
2
1

18.9 MILLER CURRENT EFFECTS  
When measuring the turn-off current, the designer should consider the inevitable Miller 
current that will flow into the collector capacitance during turn-off.  
This effect is often neglected in discussions of high-voltage transistor action. It results 
in an apparent collector-current conduction, even when Q1 is fully turned off. Its magnitude 
depends on the rate of change of collector voltage (dV
C
/dt) and collector-to-base depletion 
capacitance. Further, if the switching transistor Q1 is mounted on a heat sink, there may 
be considerable capacitance between the collector of Q1 and the common line, providing 
an additional path for apparent collector current. This should not be confused with Miller 
current proper, as its magnitude can often be several times greater than the Miller current.  
These capacitive coupling effects result in an apparent collector current throughout the 
voltage turn-off edge, giving a plateau on the measured collector current. Hence, the mea-
sured current can never be zero as the collector voltage passes through V
ceo
. Figure 1.18.2c
shows the plateau current. This effect, although inevitable, is generally neglected in 
the published secondary breakdown characteristics for switching transistors. Maximum 
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
delete page pdf acrobat reader; reader extract pages from pdf
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
cut pages from pdf reader; cut pages out of pdf file
18. SNUBBER NETWORKS
1.141
collector dV
C
/dt values are sometimes quoted, and this can be satisfied by a suitable selec-
tion of C1. When power FET switches are used, the maximum dV/dt values must be satis-
fied to prevent parasitic transistor action; hence, snubber networks must still be used in 
most high-voltage power FET applications. 
18.10 THE WEAVING LOW-LOSS SNUBBER DIODE*
As shown previously, to reduce secondary breakdown stress during the turn-off of high-
voltage bipolar transistors, it is normal practice to use a snubber network. 
Unfortunately, in normal snubber circuits, a compromise choice must be made between 
a high-resistance snubber (to ensure a low turn-on current) and a low-resistance snubber 
(to prevent a race condition at light loads where narrow pulse widths require a low CR time 
constant). This conflict often results in a barely satisfactory compromise. The “Weaving 
snubber diode” provides an ideal solution. 
The circuit for this snubber arrangement is shown in Fig. 1.18.3. It operates as follows. 
Assume that transistor Q1 is on so that the collector voltage is low. Current will be flow-
ing from the supply line through the transformer primary P1, and also from the auxiliary 
supply through resistor R2 and snubber diode D5 into the transistor collector. 
FIG. 1.18.3 The “Weaving snubber diode” low-loss switching stress reduction (snubber) circuit.
At the end of the “on” period, Q1 will start to turn off. As the collector current falls, the 
transformer primary leakage inductance will cause the collector voltage to rise. However, 
when the collector voltage is equal to the auxiliary supply voltage, the primary current will 
be diverted into the snubber diode D5 (flowing in the reverse recovery direction in D5) and 
back into the auxiliary supply through D6. This reverse current flow in D5 will continue 
for its reverse recovery time. 
*The “snubber diode” was patented by Rodney J.Weaving in 1979. 
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
delete pdf pages online; delete pages pdf preview
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
delete page pdf; delete page pdf online
1.142
PART 1
During this reverse recovery period, Q1 will continue to turn off, its collector current falling 
to zero, while the collector stress voltage remains clamped by D5 at a value only slightly above 
the auxiliary supply voltage. Consequently, Q1 turns off under negligible stress conditions. 
The reverse recovery time of the snubber diode must be longer than the turn-off time 
of transistor Q1. Special medium-speed soft recovery diodes are manufactured for this 
purpose (for example, Philips® Type #BYX 30 SN).  
During the turn-off action, the recovered charge from the snubber diode D5 is stored in 
the auxiliary capacitor C1, to be used to polarize D5 during the next “on” period; conse-
quently, very little turn-off energy is lost to the system. 
When Q1 turns on again, very little charge will be extracted from the cathode of D5 
during the turn-on edge, because the diode depletion layer is wide and the capacitance low 
(the normal variable-capacitance behavior of the diode). Hence the turn-on stress of Q1 is 
not significantly increased. 
When Q1 is in its saturated “on” state, a current will flow from the auxiliary supply and 
capacitor C1 to reestablish the forward-bias condition of the snubber diode D5, part of this 
energy being the previous recovered charge. As soon as the snubber diode is conducting, it 
is conditioned for a further turn-off cycle. 
18.11 “IDEAL” DRIVE CIRCUITS FOR 
HIGH-VOLTAGE BIPOLAR TRANSISTORS 
Figure 1.18.4 shows a combination of the “snubber diode” and “Baker clamp” circuits, with 
a push-pull base drive to Q1. 
FIG. 1.18.4 Snubber diode and Baker antisaturation clamp combination.
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat. VB example code to create graphics watermark on multiple PDF pages within the
delete pages from pdf acrobat reader; delete pages of pdf preview
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
as a kind of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS on slide with no more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe
delete page on pdf document; delete pages from pdf acrobat
18. SNUBBER NETWORKS
1.143
This arrangement is particularly suitable for high-voltage flyback converters where the 
collector voltage may be of the order of 800 V or more during the flyback period. It oper-
ates as follows.  
When the drive voltage goes high, Q2 is turned on and Q3 off. Current flows via R3, 
Q2, C2, and D7 to the base of the power transistor Q1. The overdrive provided by the low-
impedance R3, C2 network turns Q1 on rapidly. 
As Q1 turns on, the collector voltage falls. When this reaches 12 V (the auxiliary supply 
voltage), the snubber diode D5 will be forward-biased and current will flow via R2, D5 
into the collector of Q1.
Q1 continues to turn on, taking the collector voltage toward zero, until the Baker clamp 
voltage is reached. At this value D3 becomes forward-biased, diverting part of the base 
drive current into D3, D5, and the collector of Q1. 
At this point C2 will have charged to a voltage such that the drive current will be 
diverted via D1, D2, and L1 into the base of Q1. The voltage on the collector of Q2 will now 
be defined by the sum of the voltage drops across Q1 (V
be
), D1, D2, and Q2 (V
sat
)—say, 2.5 
V. The collector clamp voltage will be this value less the voltage drop across D3, D5—say, 
1 V. This voltage can be increased by introducing more diodes in series with D1 and D2. 
(The voltage across L1 is negligible.) 
Hence, during the remainder of the “on” period, the main drive current path is via 
R3, Q2, D1, D2, L1, into the base emitter of Q1. Baker clamp action is provided by 
D3, D5. 
At the end of the “on” period, the drive voltage goes low, turning Q2 off and Q3 on and 
clamping the cathode of D4 to the –5-V bias line. Diodes D7, D1, and D2 will be reverse-
biased, and the turn-off current path is via D4 and L1. 
However, L1 was conducting current in the forward direction before turn-off and will 
continue to maintain this forward (but now decaying) current for the first part of the turn-
off action. Hence the turn-off current in L1 will decay to zero and then reverse via D4, 
providing the ideal turn-off current ramp specified for high-voltage transistors in Chap. 15. 
Resistor R4 discharges C2 during the “off” period.  
When all carriers have been removed from the base-emitter junction of Q1, the junc-
tion will block, and the flyback action of L1 will force the base-emitter into reverse 
breakdown. The breakdown voltage (approximately –7.5 V) is less than the –5-V bias, 
and this breakdown action stops when the energy in L1 is  dissipated. Note: Many 
high-voltage  transistors are designed for this breakdown mode of operation during 
turn-off.  
At the same time, as Q1 turns off, the collector voltage will be rising toward the fly-
back voltage (800 V). However, when the collector voltage reaches 12 V (the auxiliary 
voltage), the snubber diode D5 will be reversed-biased, and the collector current will be 
diverted into D5, D6, and the auxiliary line. The reverse recovery time of D5 is longer 
than the turn-off time of Q1, and Q1 turns off under low-stress conditions with only 12 V 
on the collector. When Q1 has turned off and D5 blocks, the collector voltage will rise 
to the flyback value. The recovered charge of D5 is stored on C1 for the next forward 
drive pulse. 
Although this circuit does not provide proportional drive current in the conventional 
way, the Baker clamp adjusts the current into the base of the power device to suit the gain 
and collector current. Hence the action is similar to that of the proportional drive circuit 
except that the drive power needs are greater. 
In conclusion, this drive circuit combines most of the advantages of the proportional 
drive circuit, the snubber diode, and the Baker clamp. It also provides a correctly profiled 
drive current to give low stress and fast and efficient switching action in high-voltage, high-
power bipolar switching applications. 
1.144
PART 1
18.12 PROBLEMS 
1. Explain what is meant by the term “snubber network.” 
2. Explain the two major functions of a typical snubber network. 
3. Discuss the criteria for selecting snubber components, for a bipolar transistor with an 
inductive load, if secondary breakdown is to be avoided. 
4. Why is a large snubber capacitor undesirable? 
5. Describe a low-loss snubber technique that may be used in place of the conventional RC
snubber network. 
6. Using the snubber network shown in Fig. 1.18.1, calculate the minimum snubber capac-
itance required to prevent the collector voltage on Q1 exceeding 70% of V
ceo
during Q1 
turn-off. (Assume that the fall time of Q1 is 0.5 μs, the collector current I
P
is 2 A, and 
the V
ceo
rating is 475 V.) 
1.145
CROSS CONDUCTION 
19.1 INTRODUCTION
The term “cross conduction” is used to describe a potentially damaging condition that can 
arise in half-bridge and full-bridge push-pull converters.
The problem is best explained with reference to the circuit shown in Fig. 1.19.1. It can 
be clearly seen that in this half-bridge configuration, if Q1 and Q2 are both turned on at 
the same time, they will provide a direct short circuit across the supply lines (transform-
ers T1 and T2 are current transformers and have little resistance). This will often result in 
immediate failure, as a result of the damagingly high currents that will flow in the switch-
ing devices. 
Clearly the transistors would not normally be driven such that they would both be on 
at the same time. The cause of cross conduction can be traced to excessive storage time 
in the switching transistors. Figure 1.19.2 shows typical base drive and collector-current 
waveforms for the two half-bridge transistors Q1 and Q2 under square-wave (100% duty 
cycle), full-conduction conditions. As may be expected, because of the storage time t
1
-t
3
,
cross conduction occurs.
In the top waveform, the base drive to Q1 is shown being removed at time t
1
(the 
beginning of the “off” period for Q1 and the “on” period for Q2). However, because 
of the inevitable storage time of transistor Q1, its collector current is not blocked until 
a somewhat later time t
3
. At the same time, the lower transistor Q2 is turning on, as 
shown in the lower waveform. In bipolar transistors, the turn-on delay is typically less 
than the storage time; hence, with a full 100% duty cycle (push-pull base drive), there 
will be a short period (t
2
to t
3
) when both devices will be conducting. Since these are 
directly across the supply lines, the low source impedance allows very large collector 
currents to flow. This effect is shown as current spikes on the waveforms for Q1 and 
Q2 in Fig. 1.19.2.
If the source impedance of the supply lines is very low, and no series current lim-
iting is provided, damagingly large cross-conduction currents will flow through Q1 
and Q2 under the above conditions, and the excessive stress may cause failure of the 
transistors.
CHAPTER 19
1.145
1.146
PART 1
FIG. 1.19.1 Basic half-bridge circuit.
FIG.  1.19.2 Typical  cross-conduction current 
waveforms.
19. CROSS CONDUCTION
1.147
19.2 PREVENTING CROSS CONDUCTION 
Traditionally, the method used to prevent cross conduction is to provide a “dead” time (both 
transistors off), between alternate on drive pulses. This “dead time” must be of sufficient 
duration to ensure that the “on” states of the two power transistors do not overlap under any 
conditions. 
Unfortunately, there is considerable variation in the storage times of apparently similar 
devices. Also, the storage time is a function of temperature, drive circuit, and collector-
current loading. Hence, to ensure an adequate safety margin, the “dead time” will need to 
be considerable, and this will reduce the efficiency and the range of pulse-width control.
Clearly, a system that permits 100% pulse width without any risk of cross conduction 
would be preferred. The dynamic control provided by the cross-coupled inhibit technique 
described below admirably meets this requirement.
19.3 CROSS-COUPLED INHIBIT
Figure 1.19.3 shows the basic elements of a dynamic cross-coupled, cross-conduction 
inhibit technique, applied in this example to a push-pull converter.
FIG. 1.19.3 Example of a cross-coupled cross-conduction inhibit circuit.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested