c# pdf reader itextsharp : Delete pdf pages reader software Library project winforms asp.net windows UWP Switchmode_Power_Supply_Handbook_3rd_edi19-part485

1.158
PART 1
The design approach will assume that the output ripple current must not exceed 30% of I
load
(6 A p-p in this example).
Also, to allow for a range of control, the pulse width at nominal input will be 30% of 
the total period (that is, 10 Ms).
To provide an output of 5 V at a pulse width of 30%, the transformer secondary voltage 
will be
V
V t
t
s


r

out p
on
V
5 33 33
10
16 66
.
.
where t
p
 total period (at 30KHZ), ms
t
o
 “on” time ms
V
s
 secondary voltage 
The voltage V
L
across the inductor L1 during the forward “on” period is the secondoary 
voltage less the output voltage, assuming that the output capacitor C1 is large and the volt-
age change during the “on” period is negligible. 
Then
V
V
V
L
s


 
out
V
16 66 5 11 66
.
.
For steady-state conditions, the current change for the “on” period must equal the current 
change during the “off” period (in this example, 6 A). Neglecting second-order effects, the 
inductance may be calculated as follows:
L
V t
i
L

$
$
where L  required inductance, MH
         $t  “on” time, Ms
         $i  current change during “on” time
V
L
 voltage across inductor
Therefore
L
r

11 66
10
6
19 4
.
. MH
Note: A simple linear equation can be used, as the voltage across the inductance is assumed 
not to change during the “on” time and di/dt is constant.
In this example, the inductance is large because sufficient energy must be stored dur-
ing the “on” period to maintain the current during the “off” period. In push-pull forward 
converters the “off” period is much smaller, so that the secondary voltage and hence the 
inductance value would also be smaller.
20.12 OUTPUT CAPACITOR VALUE
It is normally assumed that the output capacitor size will be determined by the ripple cur-
rent and ripple voltage specifications only. However, if a second-stage output filter L2, C2 
is used, a much higher ripple voltage could be tolerated at the terminals of C1 without 
Delete pdf pages reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages from a pdf online; delete a page from a pdf in preview
Delete pdf pages reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages of pdf; cut pages from pdf
20. OUTPUT FILTERS
1.159
compromising the output ripple specification. Hence if ripple voltage were the only crite-
rion, a much smaller capacitor could be used.
For example, assume that the ripple voltage at the terminals of C1 can be 500 mV. The 
current change in L1 during the “on” period will mainly flow into C1, and hence the capaci-
tance value required to give a voltage change of 500 mV can be calculated as follows (the 
following equation assumes a perfect capacitor with zero ESR):
C
It
V
o

$
$
on
where C  output capacitance value, MF
$I  current change in L1 during “on” period, A
$t
on
 “on” time Ms
$V
o
 ripple voltage, V p-p
Therefore
C
r

6 10
05
120
.
MF
Hence, just to meet the ripple voltage requirements, a very small capacitor of only 120 MF
would be required. However, in applications in which the load current can change rapidly 
over a large range (transient load variations), a second transient load variation criterion may 
define the minimum output capacitor size.
Consider the condition when the load suddenly falls to zero after a period of maximum 
load. Even if the control circuit responds immediately, the energy stored in the series induc-
tor (½ LI2) must be transferred to the output capacitor, increasing its terminal voltage. In 
the above example, with an output capacitor of only 120 MF, a series inductance of 19.4 MH,
and a full-load current of 20 A, the voltage overshoot on load removal would be nearly 
100%. This would probably be unacceptable, and hence the maximum acceptable voltage 
overshoot on load removal may become the controlling factor.
The minimum output capacitor value to meet the voltage overshoot requirements using 
the transferred energy criteria can be calculated as follows:
Energy in output inductor when full load is suddenly removed: 
1
2
2
LI
The energy change in the output capacitor after the event will be 
1
2
1
2
2
2
CV
CV
p
o
where V
p
 maximum output voltage  6 V
V
o
 normal output voltage  5 V
Hence
1
2
1
2
2
2
2
LI
CV
V
p
o

)
Rearranging for C,
C
LI
V
V
p
o

2
2
2
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
cut pages out of pdf; copy pages from pdf to word
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
delete page pdf file reader; delete blank pages in pdf
1.160
PART 1
If the maximum voltage in this example is not to exceed 6 V, then the minimum value of 
output capacitance will be 
C
r

19 5 20
36 25
709
2
.
MF
Further, the ripple current requirements may demand that a larger capacitor be used. Some 
allowance should also be made for the effects of the capacitor ESR, which will increase the 
ripple voltage by about 20% typically, depending on the ESR and ESL of the capacitor and 
the size, shape, and frequency of the ripple current (Part 3, Chap. 12).
In conclusion, it has been shown that very effective series- and common-mode con-
ducted ripple rejection can be obtained by the addition of a relatively small additional LC
output filter network. This relatively simple change allows good ripple and noise rejection 
to be obtained using lower-cost medium-grade electrolytic capacitors and conventional 
inductor designs.
20.13 PROBLEMS 
1. Discuss the major disadvantage of switch mode power supplies compared with the older 
linear regulator types. 
2. Is the design of the output filter the only most important factor in reducing output 
ripple noise? 
3. Explain the meaning of the term “choke” as applied to output filters. 
4. Why  are  power output  filters  often relatively ineffective in dealing with  high-
frequency noise? 
5. Why are two-stage filters sometimes used in output filter applications? 
6. What is the difference between common-mode and differential-mode noise filters? 
7. In what way does the design of a common-mode choke differ from that of a series-
mode choke? 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete pages in pdf online; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Page: Extract, Copy, Paste PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Copy and Paste PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - PDF File Pages Extraction Guide.
delete page in pdf document; add and remove pages from pdf file online
1.161
POWER FAILURE 
WARNING CIRCUITS 
21.1 INTRODUCTION 
Many instrument and computer systems require early warning of imminent power failure, 
to provide sufficient time for an organized system shutdown. To maintain the output volt-
ages above the minimum specified values during this “house-keeping” process, sufficient 
energy must be stored in the power supply. A minimum holdup time (after power failure 
warning) of between 2 and 10 ms is usually specified.
21.2 POWER FAILURE AND BROWNOUT
Line failure can, of course, take many forms, but it will normally fall into one of the fol-
lowing three categories.
1. Total Line Failure: Instantaneous and catastrophic failure to zero or near zero voltage. 
2. Partial Brownout: A fall in line voltage to a value below the normal minimum (but not 
zero), followed by a recovery to normal. 
3. Brownout failure: A brownout condition followed by eventual failure. 
21.3 SIMPLE POWER FAILURE WARNING 
CIRCUITS 
Figure 1.21.1 shows a simple optically coupled circuit typical of those often used for power 
failure warning. However, it will be shown that this type of circuit is suitable only for type 1 
failures; that is, total line failure conditions. It operates as follows.
The ac line input is applied to the network R1 and bridge rectifier D1 such that 
unidirectional current pulses flow in the optical coupler diode. This maintains a pul-
sating conduction of the optical coupler transistor Q1. While this pulsating condition 
continues, C2 will be “pumped” low and maintain Q2 “on.” Hence the output power 
failure signal will remain high all the time the ac supply voltage is high enough to drive 
current into D1. 
CHAPTER 21 
1.161
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
delete blank pages from pdf file; add and delete pages from pdf
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
delete pages pdf files; delete pages out of a pdf file
1.162
PART 1
When the ac line input fails, D1 no longer provides current to OC1, and Q1 turns off. C2 
will charge via R2, and Q2 turns off. The power failure signal then goes low.
Because this circuit does not have a defined threshold voltage, it will give the required 
advance warning correctly only for condition 1 (a complete or nearly complete line fail-
ure). It will not necessarily give the advance warning correctly for condition 2 or 3 because 
during brownout the voltage may still be high enough to maintain D1 conducting. Further, 
there is a delay between line failure and a warning signal as C2 charges. 
During a line failure, the energy stored in the power supply will maintain the output 
voltage for a time period that depends on the input voltage prior to failure, the part of the 
cycle in which the failure occurs, the loading conditions, and the design of the supply. 
This holdup time can be more, but must not be less, than the power failure warning period 
required plus the delay period of the warning circuit.
With the simple circuit of Fig. 1.21.1, during a brownout condition as specified for con-
dition 2, the voltage may fall low enough for power supply output regulation to be lost, but 
not low enough for a power failure signal to be given. For brownout (condition 3), even if 
the power supply maintains the required output voltages, at the end of the brownout period 
when the line voltage eventually fails, the circuit will respond with a failure signal, and 
there will not be sufficient energy remaining in the power supply to maintain the output 
voltage for the prescribed warning period. Hence this type of circuit is not always fully 
satisfactory for brownout conditions.
Since brownout conditions occur most often, the simple type of power failure warning 
shown in Fig. 1.21.1, although often used, may be of little value.
21.4 DYNAMIC POWER FAILURE WARNING 
CIRCUITS
The more complex dynamic power failure warning circuits are able to respond to brownout 
conditions. Many types of circuit are in use, and it may be useful to examine some of the 
advantages and disadvantages of some of the more common techniques.
FIG 1.21.1 Simple optocoupled power failure warning circuit.
C# Imaging - Scan Barcode Image in C#.NET
RasterEdge Barcode Reader DLL add-in enables developers to add barcode image recognition & barcode types, such as Code 128, EAN-13, QR Code, PDF-417, etc.
delete pages on pdf; delete pages from a pdf file
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
cut pages from pdf preview; add remove pages from pdf
21. POWER FAILURE WARNING CIRCUITS
1.163
Figures 1.21.2 and 1.21.3 show two circuits that will ensure that sufficient warning of 
failure is given for all conditions.
FIG. 1.21.2 More precise “brownout” power failure warning circuit.
FIG. 1.21.3 Power failure warning circuit with “brownout” detection.
In the first example, a fraction of the DC voltage on the power converter reservoir 
capacitors C1 and C2 is compared with a reference voltage by comparator amplifier A1. 
If this voltage falls to a value at which the power supply (if it were operating at full load) 
would only just provide the prescribed hold time, then the output of amplifier A1 goes 
high, energizing the optical coupler, and a failure warning will be generated; the output 
signal goes low (“true low” logic).
This is a well-defined and reliable warning system, but it requires that the power sup-
ply be designed to provide sufficient holdup time from a minimum defined input voltage 
(below the normal minimum working voltage), to ensure that the specified warning period 
1.164
PART 1
is satisfied before the output voltage falls. To meet this need, a larger and more expensive 
supply is required for the following reasons.
Since a warning must not be given at or above the specified minimum working line 
voltage for the power supply, the selected warning voltage value must be lower than the 
minimum DC voltage normally found on C1 and C2 under fully loaded minimum line input 
voltage conditions.
To provide the required holdup time under fully loaded conditions, from this lower 
capacitor voltage, the converter must continue to give full output for a supply voltage 
that is even lower than normal; hence larger reservoir capacitors and larger-current-
rated input components will be required. This makes the power supply larger and more 
expensive.
Moreover, even this more complex arrangement can still give a false power failure 
warning for a brownout condition of type 2. If the brownout continues for a period and 
then the supply recovers, a spurious failure warning can be caused by the capacitor volt-
age falling below the minimum warning value before the line recovers, initiating a failure 
signal. It is clear that in this case there is no option but to indicate a failure signal when the 
stored energy on the storage capacitors reaches the critical value. Although the line may 
recover before eventual failure of the outputs, a failure signal must be given at this time 
because the system cannot know that the line will recover in time.
The arrangement has the advantage that short transient variations in input voltage below 
the critical limit will not cause a failure warning, since the reservoir capacitors will not 
discharge to the critical voltage very rapidly. A further advantage is that at lower loads or 
higher input voltages, there will be a longer delay before the capacitors discharge to the 
critical voltage and a power failure warning is generated.
This system provides the maximum rejection of input transient conditions, eliminat-
ing spurious and unnecessary failure warnings. The delay time adjusts “dynamically” in 
response to the loading and input voltage conditions; hence the name.
Figure 1.21.3 shows a circuit that has advantages similar to those of the previous dynamic 
system, but does not require an auxiliary supply or comparator amplifier. This circuit can be 
used in the rectified supply to the main converter, as shown, or, with appropriate component 
adjustments, in the supply to the auxiliary converter. It operates as follows.
The bridge rectifier D1–D4 will provide a full-wave rectified input to the divider chain 
R1, ZD1. At the same time, this input is applied to diode D5.
The peak ac input voltage is rectified by D5 and stored on capacitor C1. The DC voltage 
on C1 is monitored via ZD2 and Q1 and would normally bias Q1 “on”.
The rectifier diode D5 blocks the DC voltage on C1 and allows the voltage across R1, 
OC1, and Q1 to fall to zero each half cycle; that is, the voltage across R1, OC1, and Q1 
follows the input voltage. Hence, OC1 must turn off for a short period each cycle, even if 
the DC voltage on C1 is high and Q1 is on.
A failure warning will be given if OC1 turns off for more than 3 ms. This occurs if the 
voltage on C1 falls to a value at which Q1 and hence OC1 turns off; this critical voltage 
is defined by ZD1. Also, if the input supply fails completely for more than 3 ms, a power 
failure warning will be given irrespective of the state of charge on C1 (the main reservoir 
capacitor in the supply). In this case OC1 is off because the supply to R1 and OC1 is miss-
ing if the input supply is missing.
As long as the voltage on C1 is above the minimum value required to give the required 
minimum holdup time, the zener diode ZD2 will be conducting and Q1 will be on. During 
each half cycle, when the supply voltage to R1 exceeds a few volts, OC1 will turn on, 
providing a discharge pulse to C2 and preventing C2 from charging to the 2.5-V reference 
voltage PZ1. (At 2.5 V, PZ1 and Q2 would turn on, giving a fail signal.) This discharge 
“pumping” action will continue as long as the supply voltage on C1 is above the minimum 
value and the supply does not fail.
21. POWER FAILURE WARNING CIRCUITS
1.165
If the line input fails or the voltage on C 1 falls below the minimum value required to 
maintain ZD2 conducting (brownout), Q1 and OC1 will remain off and the pulse discharge 
of C2 will stop. C2 will now charge, turning PZ1 and Q1 on and giving a power failure 
warning. This warning will be given if OC1 is off for more than 3 ms. The delay period 
is well defined. When OC1 is off, C2 charges via R4 until the threshold voltage of PZ1 is 
reached (2.5 V). At this voltage PZ1 conducts, turning on Q2 and generating a power failure 
“high” signal.
If the line input fails, even if C1 remains charged and Q1 remains on, there is no supply 
to R1 and OC1 and a failure indication is given. This fast response provides and earlier 
warning of line failure so that the power supply holdup time need not be so long.
21.5 INDEPENDENT POWER FAILURE 
WARNING MODULE
The previous two power failure circuits must be part of the power supply, as they depend 
on the internal DC header voltage for their operation. Figure 1.21.4 shows a circuit that will 
operate directly from the line input and is independent of any power supply.
FIG. 1.21.4 Independent power failure module for direct operation from ac line inputs.
This circuit has its own bridge rectifier D1–D4, which again provides a full-wave 
rectified input to the feed resistor R1, ZD1, and the optical coupler diode OC1 and 
IC1. Provided that the DC voltage on C1 is above the critical minimum value, IC1 (a 
TL431 shunt regulator IC) will be turned on, regulating the voltage at point A at 5 V. 
(Note: Diode D6 conducts, clamping the voltage across R3, R4 and maintaining point 
A at 5 V.) 
When the rectified input to R1 rises above 5 V, during each half cycle, the OC1 diode 
will conduct, turning the OC1 transistor Q1 on and providing a discharge pulse to C2. This 
“pumping” action prevents C2 from charging; R5 and R6 will be conducting, and Q2 will 
be on. The output warning signal will remain “high,” in this case the normal power good 
indication state.
As before, a failure (low) signal will be given if OC1 is off for more than 3 ms, allow-
ing C2 to charge. This occurs if the voltage on C1 falls below the critical value required to 
maintain ICI “on” or if the line input fails.
1.166
PART 1
This circuit is more precise than the previous systems, with a better temperature coef-
ficient. The shunt regulator IC1 has a more precise internal voltage reference. Otherwise 
the function is similar to that shown for Fig. 1.21.3.
The time constant for the divider network R2, R3, R4, and C1 should be much less than 
the discharge time constant of power supply primary capacitors, to ensure that a warning 
is given for brownout conditions before the power supply drops out of regulation.
21.6 POWER FAILURE WARNING IN FLYBACK 
CONVERTERS 
Very simple power failure warning circuits can be fitted to flyback converters, because in 
the forward direction the flyback transformer is a true transformer, providing an isolated 
and transformed output voltage that is proportional to the applied DC.
Figure 1.21.5 shows the power section of a simple single-output flyback supply provid-
ing a 5-V output. Diode D1 conducts in the flyback mode of T1 to charge C2 and deliver 
the required 5-V output. The control circuit adjusts the duty cycle in the normal way to 
maintain the output voltage constant.
FIG. 1.21.5 A simple power failure warning circuit for flyback converters.
An extra diode and capacitor D2, C3 have been added such that D2 conducts in the 
forward mode of T1, developing a voltage V
f
on C3 of V
P
/n, which is proportional to the 
line input. 
21. POWER FAILURE WARNING CIRCUITS
1.167
The divider network R2, R3 is selected such that the SCR will turn on when the input 
voltage is at the critical minimum value. Note: This method gives good input transient 
under voltage rejection, as a warning will not be generated until the header capacitor C1 
has discharged to the critical value required for minimum warning of dropout. Under light 
loading conditions, or when the input voltage has previously been high, a longer delay is 
provided. 
In this example an option is provided for a “true high” or “true low” power failure 
signal (PFS) output.
Resistor R1 limits the charge current into C3 and prevents peak rectification of leakage 
inductance spikes. Its low value prevents any race condition at switch-on and gives fast 
response. After a failure signal has been given, the supply must be turned off to reset the 
SCR. The circuit is simple but gives good performance. 
21.7 FAST POWER FAILURE WARNING CIRCUITS 
The previous systems shown in this section respond quite slowly to brownout conditions, 
because they are sensing peak or mean voltages. The filter capacitor in the warning circuit 
introduces a delay. Its value is a compromise, being low enough to prevent a race between 
the holdup time of the power supply and the time constant of the filter capacitor, but large 
enough to give acceptable ripple voltage reduction.
It is possible to detect the imminent failure of the line before this has fully developed 
by looking directly at the rectified line input. The circuit can respond to the reduction in 
the dv/dt (rate of change of input voltage), which occurs at the beginning of a half cycle 
of operation if the peak voltage is going to be low. Hence the system is able to give more 
advanced warning of impending low-voltage conditions.
The circuit recognizes very early that the rate of change of input voltage is below the 
value necessary to generate the correct peak ac voltage. If the dv/dt as the supply passes 
through zero is low, failure is assumed, and a warning signal is generated before the half 
cycle is complete. This provides a useful extra few milliseconds of warning.
Figure 1.21.6 a shows a simulated line brownout characteristic, in which the applied 
sine-wave input suffers a sudden reduction in voltage on the second cycle.
When the rectified waveform is compared to a reference voltage, the change in supply 
voltage shows up as an increase in the time $t taken for the rectified voltage to exceed 
the reference value. This change can be used to indicate a probable failure before the full 
half cycle has been established. This method gives the earliest possible warning of power 
brownout or failure. Figure 1.21.6b shows a suitable circuit.
This circuit operates as follows. The line input is bridge-rectified by diodes D1 through 
D4. A divider network of resistors R1, R2, and R3 is placed across the bridge output, and 
this load ensures a clean rectified half-cycle waveform at point A, as shown in Fig. 1.21.6a.
This waveform is applied to the input of the comparator amplifier of PZ1 by the network 
R1, R2, and R3. As the supply voltage at A passes through 50 V during the falling second 
half of a half cycle, the voltage applied to PZ1 passes through 2.5 V and the shunt regulator 
PZ1 and optical coupler OC1 will turn off.
This starts a timing sequence on C2 such that unless the supply voltage rises through 
50 V once again during the next positive-going edge of a half cycle within a prescribed 
time, then PZ2 and Q1 are turned on, giving a power failure signal.
The timing is defined by C2, R5, and the secondary voltage (5 V in this example). 
During each half cycle, OC1 turns off and C2 will be charged from the time the input sup-
ply falls below 50 V to the time it returns above 50 V. If the “off” time of OC1 gets longer 
(as would be the case for a low input voltage, as shown in Fig. 1.21.6a), the voltage ramp 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested